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Fashion and Art Unite at MAD's Glitter Grunge Disco

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Disco was back in full swing Monday night at Glitter Grunge Disco, the Museum of Arts and Design’s annual Young Patrons Gala. Presented by Coach, the event honored New York–based artist Derrick Adams whose artwork is currently on display at the museum.

Guests arrived wearing all things glitter with a proper dose of ’90s-era plaid thrown in. Among the sparkly group were Aurora James, Zoe Buckman, sisters TK Wonder and Cipriana Quann, and Casey Fremont. Cochairs included Bettina Prentice, Sarah Arison, and Meg Sharpe.

The celebrations started before people even walked through the door: A glitter-covered Cadillac from the Coach Spring 2018 runway show was parked in front of the venue, encouraging photo shoots with its mere presence. Guests mingled as waiters served Champagne Armand De Brignac Rosé and Hendrick’s Gin dirty martinis before a seated dinner, during which remarks were given by MAD trustee Mike De Paola with Andi Potamkin Blackmore. Works by Adams as well as Bob Gruen, Rebecca Dayan, and Lindsey Adelman were part of a silent auction hosted by Paddle8, with all proceeds benefiting the museum.

Adams, outfitted in the classic American brand, said he was approached more than a year ago to present an exhibition at MAD based on a concept of his choosing. Already deep into archival research on The Negro Motorist Green Book, written by Victor Hugo Green, the artist reimagined safe destinations for the black American traveler during the Jim Crow era.

“It was a good challenge,” he told Vogue. “It took a lot of thought and reflection on how to communicate in a space that offers a particular viewpoint. The presentation came about more when I saw the space and really thought about it in the way that people move through the museum.”

“Derrick Adams: Sanctuary” contains 50 mixed-media works on display until August 12. ​

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Photos: Piedmont Park Arts Festival

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  1. Photos: Piedmont Park Arts Festival  Atlanta Journal Constitution
  2. Full coverage



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Fine arts and theater notes, Aug. 19

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Martha Berry was awarded the grand prize for her beaded bandolier bag titled “The Orange Monster’s Masquerade Ball.” Berry has been recognized at the show many times and this is her third time being honored with the grand prize.

The premier Cherokee art show runs through Sept. 22 and features 92 pieces by 60 artists, divided into traditional and contemporary categories. Artists competed for a share of more than $10,000, sponsored by Cherokee Nation businesses.

For a list of winners, go to anadisgoi.com. For more information, go to cherokeeheritage.org.

UCO gallery hosts national photo contest

University of Central Oklahoma’s Woody Gaddis Gallery invites the community to enter the fourth annual national photo contest, “Modern Tribalism: Polarization and the Social Connect/Social Disconnect.”

This year’s theme encourages artists to submit work that embraces, fights against or questions modern tribalism through photography.

Participants may submit up to three works, which can include traditional darkroom, digital, alternative process and manipulated images. There is no entry fee. The deadline for digital submissions is Aug. 26, and the deadline for physical submissions is Sept. 21.

For submission requirements, go to sites.uco.edu/la/masscomm/photocontestnational.asp or contact Cejda Mackey at acjeda@uco.edu or 974-5887.

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This Ottawa arts centre film program is giving 'newcomer youth a voice'

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An Ottawa arts centre is hoping to inspire young people from the city's refugee and immigrant communities to use video to tell stories — especially their own.

SAW Video has partnersed with the Ottawa Community Immigrant Services Organization to launch a six-week video production program for youth between the ages of 13 and 24. 

Filmmakers Radamis Zaky and Aia Raafat are helping 10 youth conceive, shoot, direct and edit short videos about their experiences as newcomers to Canada.

Zaky told CBC Radio's In Town and Out that he felt the need to share his skills.

"These young people are excellent in telling stories. And they know how to tell stories. They are always on the social media," Zaky said.

"[But] they need to [learn the] basics. They need to understand the different shots, the different frames, different editing techniques." 

A partnership between SAW and the Ottawa Community Immigrant Services Organization created a new six weeks video production and filmmaking program specifically for newcomers, immigrant and refugee teens. 13:00

The next generation  

The program, called New Voices, is hoping to remove some of the barriers young people who are newcomers to Canada may face trying to learn video production.

Once they complete their final projects, participants will receive a certificate and have access to SAW Video's facilities and equipment. 

"This program is very valuable because it gives newcomer youth a voice," said Gabby Calugay-Casuga, a literary arts student at Canterbury High School who's enrolled in the program.  

"I think it's really great that we take a really diverse group and we are all pushed into a media setting and get to make films."

The program also teaches students about sound, lighting, composition and special effects. They'll eventually use those skills to create documentaries, dramatic films and experimental films.

"We started from the basics — and I needed that," Calugay-Casuga said.

'Sort of a therapy'

Some of the program's students are hesitant at first to share their stories, Zaky said.

Sometimes that's because they're too shy, but other times it's because they feel their stories are too despairing, he explained.

One of the program's students, Zaky said, is telling his story about the abuse he faced from teachers in one of the host countries he lived in as a refugee — and how that experience initially made him feel afraid in Canada. 

"This program is beyond just teaching the kids the basics of the video production … I would argue that this is sort of a therapy," Zaky said. 

One brilliant way for people to know each other is to watch… films.– Radamis   Zaky ,  filmmaker and New Voices Instructor 

"The program is helping them express frustration and also [recover] a little bit from the trauma that they had in their transition … from their countries of origin until they came to Canada." 

The films the students produce will be screened sometime this fall, he added. 

"People need to understand and to know each other," Zaky said. "And one brilliant way for people to know each other is to watch … films."

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