Surya Grahan 2018 Today: No Need To Alter Any Dietary Habits During Partial Solar Eclipse, Say Experts - Canadanewsmedia
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Surya Grahan 2018 Today: No Need To Alter Any Dietary Habits During Partial Solar Eclipse, Say Experts

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2018 has been a great year, as far as celestial events are concerned. After July’s complete solar eclipse, sky-watchers are now getting ready to witness the partial solar eclipse or surya grahan today. The solar eclipse will take place on August 11, 2018 and will be visible to only some parts of the globe- countries that lie in the northern hemisphere of the globe. Unfortunately, astronomy enthusiasts in India will not be able to witness this particular eclipse, as it will only be visible over Northern Canada, North-eastern US, Greenland, Siberia, as well as some parts of Asia, including the cities of Seoul in South Korea and Shanghai in China.

Surya Grahan (Partial Solar Eclipse) Timings Today

In this particular solar eclipse, the Sun will reportedly be obscured by the Moon for a total period of three and a half hours on August 11, 2018. The solar eclipse time in India will be between 1.32 pm and and 5.02 pm.

Diet Myths & Superstitions Related To Partial Solar Eclipse:

One of the most commonly held solar eclipse related myth is that cooking or consuming food during the duration of the solar eclipse may be harmful, as it can turn the food poisonous. There is a myth that even chopping vegetables, fruits or any other eatables while the solar eclipse lasts, can contaminate or poison the food. Although, this myth gains traction around the time of a total solar eclipse, some people refuse to cook or eat even during partial eclipses.

No Dietary Restrictions Necessary, Says NASA

American space organization National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been especially critical of all such myths, completely discrediting all of them. Addressing this particular belief of poisonous food during a solar eclipse, NASA had said last year, “Related to the false idea of harmful solar rays is that during a total solar eclipse, some kind of radiation is produced that will harm your food. If that were the case, the same radiations would harm the food in your pantry, or crops in the field.” It adds by saying, “If someone is accidentally food-poisoned with potato salad during an eclipse, some might argue that the event was related to the eclipse itself even though hundreds of other people at the same location were not at all affected.”

No Scientific Basis To Eating Restrictions, Say Doctors

Internal Medicine specialist Dr. Paritosh Baghel of SL Raheja Hospital in Mumbai is also in the favour of complete renouncement of such superstitions, related to celestial events, especially eclipses. “It (the myth) has got no scientific basis to it”, says Dr. Bagel, adding that the reason these beliefs have been perpetuated in cultures across the globe is due to ignorance. “In older times, people did not know why the Sun went dark (during an eclipse). In our culture, it was believed that it was being eaten by a demon. All around the world, different cultures have different kinds of reasoning. But the only reason behind these myths was ignorance and lack of knowledge”, he said, adding, “During an eclipse, you can do all the activities and follow all your dietary habits that you do on a daily basis”.

Dr. Baghel emphasises that there is no need for anyone to alter any of our dietary habits or schedules, due to any celestial event, including partial or complete solar eclipses.

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Famous but fickle Leonid meteor shower awaits weekend viewing

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If it’s the middle of November, it must be time for the Leonid meteor shower to streak the night skies over the Northern Hemisphere.

This famous and erraticly spectacular annual show results from the Earth moving through the trail of debris cast off by Comet Tempel-Tuttle, which comes around these parts of our solar system every 33.3 years as it orbits our sun.

Although the Leonids (so named because the radiant point of the shower seems to be in the constellation Leo, although they can be seen anywhere in the sky) reliably produce about 10 to 15 meteors per hour, they sometimes present a dazzling and dizzying display referred to as a meteor storm. In the past, this has resulted in an estimated 3,000 meteors per minute

A 1997 view from space of the Leonid meteor shower.
NASA

One of the most famous storms, in 1833, produced an estimated 100,000 meteors per hour and helped kick-start modern research into meteors. (The image at the top, an 1889 engraving by Adolf Vollmy—based on a painting by Swiss artist Karl Jauslin that was itself based on a first-person account—depicts that storm, which was visible over most of North America.) Subsequent storms seemed to occur about the same time as the comet’s orbital period, or about every 33 years, presumably coinciding with a fresh dump of sand- and pea-sized particles that would burn up as they got dragged into our planet’s atmosphere and provide celestial fireworks.

This hasn’t always been the case, however, and experts are predicting that this will not be a storm year.

The peak viewing days for the Leonids are the mornings of November 17 and 18 (meaning Friday night/Saturday morning and Saturday night/Sunday morning). And although the weather in the Vancouver are looks to be cooperating for the weekend, with clear and variably cloudy skies, the bright moon will drown out the fainter meteors. Therefore, the best bet to view meteors is not to stay up until after midnight and compete with both city lights and the moon but to go to bed early and get up at about 3 a.m., as the moon sets, and watch until the morning light floods the sky.

Then take a nap.

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How to watch the Leonids, a dazzling meteor shower coming this weekend

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This weekend, head outside and look up to catch a glimpse of the Leonid meteor shower.

The Leonids are famous for being some of the most spectacular meteor storms in recorded history. They tend to occur every 33 years, though the last one happened less than 20 years ago in 2001.

In 2018, expect to see 15-20 meteors per hour during the shower’s peak on Saturday night, according to AccuWeather. The radiant point is the constellation Leo, but meteors will rain down in all parts of the sky.

Though the moon is in its gibbous phase, it will set after midnight and leave the sky open for a dazzling display of shooting stars.

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The Leonid meteor shower peaks under a dark sky this weekend

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The always reliable Leonid meteor shower reaches its peak Sunday morning, November 18. Once the waxing gibbous Moon sets shortly before 2 a.m. local time, skywatchers will have more than three hours of undisturbed viewing before twilight starts to paint the sky. For the best show, observers should head as far from the city as possible — artificial lights drown out fainter meteors and render the brighter ones less impressive. Under rural skies, people with good eyesight should see an average of 15 to 20 meteors per hour.

Leonid meteors appear to radiate from a point in the constellation Leo the Lion (hence the shower’s name). This star group rises in late evening and climbs high in the southeast by the time twilight begins shortly after 5 a.m. The meteors blaze into the atmosphere at 44 miles per second, the fastest of any shower meteors. The high speeds mean they produce a greater percentage of fireballs — meteors at least as bright as the brilliant planet Venus — than most showers.

Leonid meteors begin their lives as part of a comet known as 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This comet returns to the inner solar system every 33 years. Each time it approaches the Sun, our star’s heat warms the icy nucleus, turning the ice to gas and releasing trapped dust particles in the process. The dust spreads out along the comet’s orbit, and every November Earth runs into this stream. As the dust particles slam into our planet’s upper atmosphere, they burn up from friction to create the flashes of light we see in the sky.

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