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Four honoured at Arts Recognition Awards

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TIM MEEKS/THE INTELLIGENCER
Melissa Davis, on behalf of Bay of Quinte MP Neil Ellis, Mayor Taso Chrsitopher, Quinte Arts Council's Arts Recognition Award winner Gary Magwood, and QAC Chairwoman Jenny Woods.


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Four outstanding contributors to the arts community received their just desserts Thursday afternoon at Dinkel’s Restaurant as Quinte Arts Council presented its 2018 Arts Recognition Awards at the 20th annual Mayor’s Luncheon for the Arts.
The 2018 award winners are: Brian Barlow, Lynn Fennell, Gary Magwood, and Nancy Snowdon. As a group, they demonstrate the strength and vibrancy of the local arts and cultural scene, especially in the performing arts. These enablers of music and theatre in the Quinte region have brought opportunity and vitality to the community. The winners were joined by Belleville Mayor Taso Christopher in celebrating their achievements.
Brian Barlow is a Grammy-winning drummer/arranger who serves as the creative director for The Prince Edward County Jazz Festival. As one of Canada’s premier big band arrangers, Barlow has given countless hours of his time, freely contributing arrangements for the Commodores Orchestra as well as co-founding the PEC Jazz Education program for regional high school students and the Trenton Big Band Festival.
“Brian has brought a special gift to the Quinte region as he is helping to steer our music scene in a very positive and professional direction. With him at the wheel it should be smooth sailing from here on in and there’s only one way to go and that’s up. Brian can be likened to G Force. He’s a musical genius, he’s a gift to all of us, but first and foremost he’s a gentleman,” said Susan Walsh, who nominated Barlow for the award.
“When I mentioned this award to my father, who is still with us, he’s lived in Australia for 50 years now, but was born in Belleville as well. When I mentioned this award and he was so excited that I realized he was more excited about this and more pleased about this than if I won a Grammy Award and I feel the same way, so thank you Susan and everyone on the Arts Council,” Barlow said in accepting the award.
Gary Magwood is well known in the Belleville arts scene as creator and producer of Night Kitchen Too, Belleville’s acoustic musical variety show. He was a co-founder of Belleville’s Downtown Docfest, serving as chair for its first six years. In 2016, Magwood worked with the Caravan Stage Company to open a new show in St. Petersburg, Florida. Magwood also has expertise in green building techniques and has brought creativity and leadership to the growth of that field in Ontario.
Alexandra Bell, who nominated Magwood, said, “Gary is a master at promoting, presenting and applauding talent across all of the arts. He has worked hard to create not only space for the arts, but true compensation for the artists as well. For all the work he has done and the gifts to our community that he has given, and the things that are yet to come, I’m very proud to have nominated and to give this award to Gary.”
“Thank you for this honour. I sincerely believe that live music, dance, theatre, movies, documentaries, and obviously the visual arts play a major role in the well-being of any community. It is vital to the well-being of our community to be able to see performers live and not necessarily on the screen. Thank you Taso and the city council to have the foresight to establish and arts and cultural fund that will go a long way to promoting and financing the area’s cultural events,” Magwood said.
Lynn Fennell founded the not-for-profit Prince Edward Community Theatre in 2008. Before that, he was a long time teacher at Prince Edward Collegiate where he directed numerous productions including Grease, Little Shop of Horrors, and The Wiz. He was also the 2nd Chair of the Prince Edward County Arts Council. Beyond enabling many others to create theatre, Lynn has been a committed artist for many decades including directing plays with the Belleville Theatre Guild, and the Domino Theatre in Kingston amongst others.
Moira Nikander-Forrester, past president of the Belleville Theatre Guild, nominated Fennell, who arrived late for the awards luncheon, just pulling into Belleville’s Via Rail station from a trip to Russia around 1:30 p.m. Thursday.
“It is my pure delight and extreme pleasure to tell you about Lynn Fennell, this quiet, thoughtful, renaissant man … that is until he gets on stage. And I really believe this arriving by train from Russia, to receive his Quinte Arts Council award, at the very last minute, is a perfect metaphor for everything you do in the arts, you devil,” Nikander-Forrester said.
“This time yesterday we were in an airport in Helsinki and that was after two weeks in Russia and as you can tell by the way I’m dressed (shorts and T-shirt) I wasn’t expecting to be here this afternoon, but I’m delighted I got to be here. I’m thrilled by the nomination and award and wonderful remarks from a long-time colleague, I sure appreciate that. I never seek recognition, I never seek accolades, I’m happy to be doing what I’m offered to do. It’s not about accolades, it’s not about acknowledgments, but by gosh, you know, it sure feels good when your colleagues and peers acknowledge what you’ve accomplished with applauds, just like the audiences do on opening night, that’s what it’s all about. I’m very thankful to the Quinte Arts Council for this recognition and award,” Fennell said.
Nancy Snowdon has made significant contributions to the performing arts in Quinte region. For over a decade she has served on the board of the Stirling Festival Theatre and is also a long-time serving member on the board of the Quinte Symphony. Snowdon, who was nominated by Marilyn Lawrie, is recognized for her leadership in governance within the arts sector, as well as her tireless contributions as a ‘boots on the ground’ volunteer selling tickets, billeting artists, and volunteering in the office of Stirling Festival Theatre.
Two student bursary awards were also handed out to Belleville’s Dallin Whitford and Brayah Pickard of Carrying Place.
Whitford, a Bayside Secondary School graduate, received the Hugh P. O’Neil Student Arts Bursary. Whitford is well known to the stages of the area as he has performed in more than 25 musicals throughout Quinte. He has recorded and released an EP of original songs called Brainstorm, and has decided to pursue his passion further as a Bachelor of Music (jazz voice) student at Humber College.
Pickard, a Centennial Secondary School graduate, received the Susan Richardson Bursary. Centennial music teacher Dave Reed calls Pickard “a highly talented musician with a natural gift for performing.” She is attending the joint Bachelor of Music program through Queen’s University and St. Lawrence College.
“A big time thank you to all the volunteers and all the team members of the Quinte Arts Council. It shows that arts are alive and well in Belleville. I’m very excited about it and for all the volunteers involved and I’m looking forward to next year and hosting another luncheon for the arts,” said Mayor Christopher.
The Mayor’s Luncheon and Arts Recognition Awards is sponsored by: McDougall Insurance, Veridian Connections, CJBQ, Mix 97, Rock 107, Cool 100.1, and 95.5 Hits FM, and The Belleville Intelligencer. The Quinte Arts Council is proudly supported by grants from The City of Belleville and the Ontario Arts Council.


TIM MEEKS/THE INTELLIGENCERMelissa Davis, on behalf of Bay of Quinte MP Neil Ellis, Mayor Taso Chrsitopher, Quinte Arts Council’s Arts Recognition Award winner Brian Barlow, and QAC Chairwoman Jenny Woods.


TIM MEEKS/THE INTELLIGENCER Melissa Davis, on behalf of Bay of Quinte MP Neil Ellis, Mayor Taso Chrsitopher, Quinte Arts Council’s Arts Recognition Award winner Lynn Fennell, and QAC Chairwoman Jenny Woods.


TIM MEEKS/THE INTELLIGENCER Melissa Davis, on behalf of Bay of Quinte MP Neil Ellis, Mayor Taso Chrsitopher, Quinte Arts Council’s Arts Recognition Award winner Nancy Snowdon, and QAC Chairwoman Jenny Woods.

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Art's beloved 'Blue Boy' gets major 250th birthday makeover

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SAN MARINO, Los Angeles County — “Blue Boy” is getting a long-awaited makeover, and the public can watch as one of the world’s most recognizable paintings gets a little nip here, a nice tuck there and some splashes of fresh paint (blue presumably) just in time for the eternally youthful adolescent to mark his 250th birthday.

Thomas Gainsborough’s stunning oil on canvas featuring a British youth dressed nearly all in blue has been one of the most sought-out attractions at Southern California’s Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens since its arrival in 1921.

But it hasn’t had a substantial restoration in at least 97 years, and over time it’s become a bit torn and tattered, some of its colors have faded, and worse still, some of its paint is beginning to flake.

All that begins to stop Saturday when the Huntington’s senior paintings conservator, Christina O’Connell, goes to work armed with an array of 21st century tools to restore an 18th century masterpiece.

She’ll have a microscope that, at 6 feet, is taller than she is and can zoom in on the painting’s smallest details and magnify them 25 times. She’ll have numerous digital X-radiography and infrared reflectography images of the work that she’s been compiling and studying over the past year. And, of course, there will be paint created to match what Gainsborough was using circa 1770.

With all that at her disposal, she expects to have “Project Blue Boy” completed about this time next year and the kid back on the Huntington’s Thornton Gallery wall, alongside other stunning portraits from the era, sometime in early 2020.

As O’Connell toils in the same area where “Blue Boy” has hung for nearly a century, visitors will be able to walk up and watch what she’s doing. And, during occasional breaks, she’ll stop to explain it to them.

“One of the reasons why the painting hasn’t undergone such an extensive conservation treatment before was because people always wanted to keep it on view. So this is a way to address the conservation needs of the painting while keeping it on view — so the visitors won’t miss him,” she said with a smile as she took a break from her work in the gallery last week.

Indeed, “Blue Boy” — whoever he was — has become a worldwide icon since Gainsborough put him on display to acclaim at Britain’s Royal Academy exhibition of 1770. The artist titled the work “A Portrait of a Young Gentleman,” but when stunned viewers saw the full-length portrait of an adolescent dressed all in bright-blue silk, from his tunic to the breeches extending just below his knees, they quickly gave him a nickname.

Although Gainsborough, one of the greatest British painters of the 18th century, is renowned as a master of the brush, O’Connell says she won’t be nervous while a crowd watches her every move when she takes up her own brush to add touches to replace what the painting has lost to the ravages of time.

“We’re dealing with a lot of the usual suspects when it comes to a painting this age as far as condition issues are concerned,” she said, adding that she has repaired much worse, including a painting that was once handed to her in pieces.

Art historians have never figured out exactly who “Blue Boy” was, although they have a pretty good suspect, said Melinda McCurdy, the Huntington’s associate curator for British art and O’Connell’s partner in the restoration project.

“It could be an image of Gainsborough Dupont, who was the artist’s nephew,” McCurdy said. “He lived with the family, so he would have been a readily available model.”

McCurdy says it’s important that people see the care, which isn’t cheap or easy, that must be taken to maintain such treasured objects.

“We’re not just a building with pretty things on the wall,” she says. “We take care of them. We preserve them for the future.”

John Rogers is an Associated Press writer.

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Brooks: Women for Men's Health Gala launch at Hotel Arts

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Pictured, from left, at the Women For Men's Health (WFMH) reception Sept. 11 at Hotel Arts are, from left: Dr. Marty Duffy, WFMH founder Dr. Shelley Spaner, Karen Gosbee, WFMH's new mental health ambassador, Dr. Geoff Gotto and Dr. Anthony Cook. The reception introduced guests to Gosbee and also announced details of the second annual WFMH gala — The Big Ball — Feb. 1 at Hotel Arts.


Bill Brooks / Bill Brooks

Listen up Mother Nature. I’ve got a bone to pick with you. Not only did you create the postponement of the Hull in One golf tournament, but you made organizers of the Women for Men’s Health pool party at Hotel Arts somewhat stressed. But the terrific team at Hotel Arts can turn on a dime and seamlessly moved the Sept. 11 party indoors to Raw Bar.

The Women for Men’s Health (WFMH) Group, with the support of the Prostate Cancer Center (PCC), was established in 2016. Since  inception, the group has raised more than $250,000 and has secured more than $1 million in funding for expansion of Men’s Health Initiatives at the PCC. Readers may recall the inaugural WFMH gala held this past January at Hotel Arts was an enormous success. And the plans unveiled at the pool party for the second annual event — The Big Ball taking place Feb. 1,2019 had all in attendance buzzing with anticipation.

A powerful statistic that hits at the heart of the need for Men’s Health Initiatives comes when one looks at the top 13 causes of death in Alberta. This includes all cancers, heart disease, accidental or unintentional injury, diabetes, stroke, chronic liver disease and respiratory disease.

Men lead women in every category except one. Women die more frequently than men from Alzheimer’s disease/dementia. The reason for this is that men simply do not live long enough to die from this. The inequity in gender health becomes even more staggering when one looks into men’s mental health struggles. Annually, more than 500 Albertans die of suicide. Of these, more than 400 are males between the ages of 30-69.

That is why the focus of The Big Ball will be men’s mental health. WFMH founder Dr. Shelley Spaner spoke eloquently as to the cause for support and took a great deal of pride in introducing Karen Gosbee as the ambassador for the 2019 ball. Gosbee’s husband George took his own life in November last year. Karen has since become a phenomenal advocate and community leader in mental health. Her address this night was powerful indeed and will no doubt ensure the Big Ball will be an enormous success.

Among the select group of guests in attendance were: Hotel Arts Group general manager and PCC board member Mark Wilson and his wife Kerry; philanthropist and community leader Ann McCaig; Freedom 55 Financial’s Danielle Sutton and her daughter Olivia; Brandsmith’s Shea Kerwood; YYC Cycle’s Andrew Obrecht; PCC executive director Pam Heard with colleagues Shannon De Vall, Eva Moreau and Anthony Prymack; ARC Financial’s Nancy Lever; PCC board members Maryse St-Laurent and Andrew Abbott; Kathy Hays; Patti O’Connor; bestselling author Kirstie McLellan Day; Dr. Marty Duffy; Dr. Geoff Gotto; Dr. Anthony Cook; Lana Rogers; and Kim Berjian.

Please mark your calendar for Feb. 1 and plan to attend and support The Big Ball at Hotel Arts.

With files from Dr. Shelley Spaner


From left: Herald scribe and Prostate Cancer Centre (PCC) board member Bill Brooks, PCC executive director Pam Heard, PCC board member and Women For Men’s Health founder Dr. Shelley Spaner and PCC board member and Hotel Arts Group general manager Mark Wilson.

Bill Brooks /

Bill Brooks


Freedom 55 Financial’s Danielle Sutton and her daughter Olivia Sutton.

Bill Brooks /

Bill Brooks


Dr. Shelley Spaner (left) and Women For Men’s Health mental health ambassador Karen Gosbee.

Bill Brooks /

Bill Brooks


From left: YYC Cycle’s Andrew Obrecht, Prostate Cancer Centre’s Shannon De Vall and Brandsmith’s Shea Kerwood.

Bill Brooks /

Bill Brooks


From left: Patti O’Connor, Kathy Hays and Kirstie McLellan Day.

Bill Brooks /

Bill Brooks


Ann McCaig (left) and ARC Financial’s Nancy Lever.

Bill Brooks /

Bill Brooks


From left: Dr. Anthony Cook, Anthony Prymack and Dr. Marty Duffy.

Bill Brooks /

Bill Brooks


Hotel Arts’ Fraser Abbott (left) and his brother, Prostate Cancer Centre board member Andrew Abbott.

Bill Brooks /

Bill Brooks

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Uncertain future for arts centre neighbouring damaged Fairview Arena

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The owner of Indefinite Arts Centre says increased demand for the program’s services for people with disabilities warrants an expansion but his hands are currently tied as he awaits a City of Calgary decision on what will become of the attached arena.

On February 20, the roof atop the arena at the Fairview Arena and Community Hall collapsed after the building in the 8,000 block of Fairmount Drive Southeast, was deemed unsafe and closed to the public. The structural damage to the part of the building that housed Indefinite Arts Centre was minor but the studio was forced to vacate the premises.  

The art program was displaced for nearly five months, operating temporarily out of the Shane Homes YMCA, before it was permitted to return to Fairview in July.

The building has been without heat after the gas lines were severed and the artists have resorted to wearing jackets indoors in an attempt to stay warm.

CTV Calgary was notified of the heat concerns and, after the story aired, Indefinite Arts Centre’s owner, Jung-Suk Ryu, says he received a call from a senior official in Mayor Nenshi’s office stating she wasn’t pleased that Ryu had discussed the issue with the media.

“My responsibility as the CEO of this organization is to be a strong advocate for our needs first,” Ryu told CTV on Friday. “The fact that it may not have been taken so well is very upsetting.”

In a statement, Nenshi’s office stated their concerns. “We continue to be committed to helping any organization that does important work in Calgary to the extent that we can but it is always easier if we hear it directly first instead of through other channels.”

Ryu says he has been supported in his effort to have the issue addressed. “The general consensus of our team members was I did the right thing when we went to the media to talk about the issues facing this building. We talked about some of the frustrations

Contactors from Indefinite Arts Centre’s insurance company have since restored heat to the studio.

Ryu hopes the City of Calgary will come to a decision on the fate of the property in the near future. “We’re in an eyesore of a building. This affects the community, not only the community that we serve but the broader community of Fairview.”

A stakeholders meeting was held Thursday night to discuss potential options for the building but the arts centre will not permitted to expand or renovate until a decision on the property is finalized.

With files from CTV’s Jaclyn Brown

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