On Politics: Paul Manafort Is Close to a Plea Deal - Canadanewsmedia
Connect with us

Politics

On Politics: Paul Manafort Is Close to a Plea Deal

Published

on


On Politics: Paul Manafort Is Close to a Plea Deal

Image
Paul Manafort is scheduled for trial next week on charges stemming from work he did for pro-Russia political forces in Ukraine.CreditCreditJacquelyn Martin/Associated Press

Good Friday morning. Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today:

Paul Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign chairman, is close to a plea deal with federal prosecutors, people familiar with the case said. [Read the story]

Mr. Trump denied that nearly 3,000 people had died in Hurricane Maria, claiming that Democrats had made up the number to make him look bad. [Read the story]

Safiya Wazir, 27, who fled the Taliban in Afghanistan with her family in 1997, won an upset victory in a Democratic primary for New Hampshire state representative. [Read the story]

Dianne Feinstein, the senior Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, said she had referred an unspecified matter involving Judge Brett Kavanaugh to federal investigators. [Read the story]

Brock Long, the FEMA chief, has been forced to divert attention amid Hurricane Florence preparations to personal damage control over an investigation into his possible misuse of agency vehicles. [Read the story]

The National Labor Relations Board is set to publish a proposed rule redefining a company’s responsibility for workers engaged at arm’s length, such as those hired by contractors or franchisees. [Read the story]

Economists say relatively modest gains over the last few years are endangered by the Trump administration’s policies and are vulnerable to a downturn. [Read the story]

Mark Zuckerberg published a roughly 3,300-word blog post cataloging steps that Facebook has taken to prevent election interference. [Read the story]

Companies and business groups are mounting a last-ditch effort to convince Mr. Trump that his trade policies are hurting his base. [Read the story]

_____________________

Today’s On Politics briefing was compiled by Emily Baumgaertner in Washington.

Check back later for On Politics With Lisa Lerer, a nightly newsletter exploring the people, issues and ideas reshaping the political world.

Is there anything you think we’re missing? Anything you want to see more of? We’d love to hear from you. Email us at onpolitics@nytimes.com.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

The Latest In Politics: Kavanaugh, Rosenstein

Published

on

By


By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic. This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.
See details.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Women And Politics: What's Changed Since Anita Hill

Published

on

By


By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic. This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.
See details.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Beer, sausages and politics: German nationalism threatens Oktoberfest

Published

on

By


Despite its political neutrality and impression of inconsequential revelry, in recent decades, the festival has become a stage on which politicians can show off their common touch.
Parading in dirndls, chewing pretzels and singing folk songs, these political elites will celebrate a “Germanness” so seemingly playful that it is acceptable in a country that, since the Second World War, has shied away from patriotism.
Wurstmarkt -- world's largest wine festival
And this weekend, the images will seem more timely than ever. The ruling conservative party in Bavaria looks likely to lose thousands of votes in the state election next month to the far-right, populist Alternative for Germany (AfD), which campaigns against immigration, Islam and multiculturalism.
It also calls on ethnic Germans to have more children to prevent the eradication of the German people. “The preservation of one’s own national people is a priority in politics and for every government,” the party said in its manifesto for last year’s federal election. Roughly one in eight Germans voted for the AfD in that election, many of them angry about the arrival of a million refugees and migrants in 2015.
Polls predict that the Christian Social Union — a conservative party that has mostly ruled Bavaria since the 1940s and is moving rapidly to the right on immigration in a bid to head off the AfD — might lose its absolute majority.
But using Oktoberfest for political advantage is nothing new.
Bavaria's State Premier Guenther Beckstein toasts with Angela Merkel during the Berlin version "Oktoberfest" in 2008Bavaria's State Premier Guenther Beckstein toasts with Angela Merkel during the Berlin version "Oktoberfest" in 2008
The festival has a long and unfortunate history of being used in this way. It first took place in 1810, following the wedding of Crown Prince Ludwig and Therese of Saxony-Hildburghausen. It was seen by some as an attempt by the nobility to win favor among normal Germans.
Then, in the 1930s, the Nazis renamed it the “Great German folk festival,” a celebration of Aryan identity.
After the war, the festival became a politics-free space. Today, politicians of all ideological backgrounds make public appearances.
From Angela Merkel to rebel left-wing politicians such as Claudia Roth, who recently paraded her dirndl there, mainstream politicians have their pictures taken holding enormous glasses of beer, or steins.
It is remarkable that all these politicians have long felt comfortable promoting a “festival that emphasizes its German origin with strength and power in every aspect,” as the official website claims.
Germany approves arms sales to Saudi Arabia, breaking coalition promiseGermany approves arms sales to Saudi Arabia, breaking coalition promise
But even this idea of Germanness lacks a certain authenticity. The kinds of dirndls and lederhosen worn at the festival have little to do with German history. Dirndels and lederhosen were not even worn in Bavaria when the festival first took place.
And it could very well be the case that this gimicky, artificial environment — complete with fancy dress and beer — provides the perfect cover for a politician to roar German songs without looking nationalist.
And it’s this roaring that might soothe some German voters that long for a uniform homeland — without otherness.
And while German politics is currently divisive and the atmosphere in Bavaria is febrile, it’s hard to see this sentiment winning a majority for any party. But as more or the German mainstream apes the policies of far-right nationalists simply to stop their votes from bleeding away, it’s worth asking the question: where could this end?

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 Canada News Media

%d bloggers like this: