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Apple MacBook Air (2018) review: the present of computing

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The fan is blowing on this brand-new MacBook Air with Retina Display. It’s a familiar sound: a computer trying to cool down a processor that’s being overtaxed by one of the eight or so apps I have running. (In this case, it’s TweetDeck going rogue.) But it’s also a sound you don’t hear on more futuristic computers like the iPad, the Surface Pro, or even the Pixelbook. Still, fan or not, the computer is handling everything I’m doing just fine, and a quick restart of the app quiets it down.

That fan is a weird place to start when talking about the new $1,199 MacBook Air. I’d rather jump into all the many good things there are to talk about: the pixel density on the new display, smaller bezels, Touch ID, the T2 security chip, a larger trackpad, and a smaller design. I’ll get into all that. But I want to hang with this fan noise for another minute because its whirring encapsulates the most important thing to know about this MacBook Air.

Namely: it’s a computer that will let you do whatever you want, even though some of those things are probably beyond its capabilities. It won’t say “no” when you want to open 20 tabs and eight apps and then edit a photo. (Though, sometimes, with a fan and spinning beachball, it will say “uncle.”) Most of all, it’s a computer that is familiar. It does everything you expect in a way that you’re used to.

Sometimes, that’s enough.

7.5

Verge Score

Good Stuff

  • Retina Display
  • Touch ID
  • Great new trackpad
  • Superb build quality

Bad Stuff

  • Display doesn’t get super bright
  • Not a huge speed upgrade
  • USB-C ecosystem still a hassle
  • For $100 more, you can get a more powerful 13-inch MacBook Pro or smaller 12-inch MacBook


When I started testing the new MacBook Air, I spent a lot of time thinking about what I should compare it to. For $100 more, you could get a 13-inch MacBook Pro with a more powerful processor and brighter screen that only weighs 0.27 pounds more. You could also opt for a 12-inch MacBook with a slightly less powerful processor that weighs 0.72 pounds less. You wouldn’t get Touch ID with either, but the point is that choosing between this new Air and existing MacBooks is not as easy as it ought to be.

Is this new Air like a 12-inch MacBook, just blown up to a slightly bigger size? Is it more like a 13-inch MacBook Pro (sans Touch Bar), just with cheaper parts? After all, if you set the latter down next to this new Air, you can barely tell them apart.

My answer is that it’s both of those things. But the more truthful answer is that it doesn’t matter. People who have purchased one of those MacBooks already have a fairly modern, powerful computer that’s nice to use. The comparison that actually matters is to the old MacBook Air. There are a ton of people who have been hanging on to theirs because it was so good and so reliable.

Comparing a 2018 laptop to one that hasn’t had a significant update since 2015 is going to strike tech enthusiasts as ridiculous. Of course the new Air is going to beat out the old Air on a whole host of metrics. But that’s precisely the point: Apple waited entirely too long to release something like this new Air, so people have been waiting.



If you’re one of those people, you’ve got a lot to catch up on. This new MacBook Air essentially takes all of the new stuff Apple has been doing with laptops for the past three years and builds it into a single device. So let’s just get into what you’re in for.

First: ports and charging. Say goodbye to MagSafe for power forever. The new Air has two USB-C ports that you use to plug everything in, including power. It’s the new standard for pretty much everything except iPhones. Though, as a standard, it is taking longer to, well, standardize than anybody would like.

The new charging cable doesn’t pop out when you trip on it, but that will not be the thing that impacts you the most. Instead, welcome to #donglelife. You’re going to need a few adapters to make sure everything that you currently plug into your old laptop will work on the new one. Fortunately, there are now some nice USB-C hubs that combine everything together. So the upside is you can have just a single cable at your desk for your monitor, power, USB-A, SD cards, and everything else.

There is a headphone jack, thankfully, but no SD card slot. Sorry.

Second is the screen. More than any other upgrade on the MacBook Air, this is the one you’re going to love. It’s a Retina Display, which, in this case, equates to a resolution of 2560 x 1600 pixels. It’s sharp and beautiful under a glossy pane of glass, with much smaller bezels. Those bezels are not as tiny as what you can get on some Windows laptops, but it’s still a massive improvement over the old Air.

There is one knock on the screen, though: it doesn’t get as bright as I would like. The spec on it is a max of 300 nits, but the important thing to know is you’ll be cranking up the brightness to near 100 percent more often. I haven’t had a problem viewing this screen, even in bright rooms, but I do have a vague worry that it’s affecting my battery life to have it cranked up higher.

Okay, two knocks: it’s not a touchscreen. Apple’s macOS isn’t designed to work with touch at all, so it’s not here. Most other computers these days — whatever their form factor — do support touch.


Third: the keyboard. It’s Apple’s newer “butterfly” design, which means that the key travel is super shallow, dust could potentially break it, and typing can be kind of loud. This third-generation version of it is designed to mitigate those last two concerns with a membrane that sits underneath the keycaps. You’ll find it’s a little weird to type on for the first day, but you’ll get used to it. Some people still really don’t like it, but I’m not one of them: I really like this keyboard, even if it is a little clacky.



Fourth is Touch ID and security.You can log in with just your fingerprint now, and it’s ridiculously fast and accurate. I’ve been able to just quickly tap it like any key and unlock my computer. It’s not as convenient as the face unlock you get with Windows Hello-compatible computers, but it’s close. Best of all, you get Touch ID without having to get the silly Touch Bar that’s on MacBook Pros. Instead, you just have real, regular function keys.

Touch ID is powered by Apple’s T2 chip, which is a little thing that keeps the entire laptop secure. It protects your fingerprint, encrypts the SSD without taxing the processor, and even turns the microphones off when the laptop is closed. It also handles a random assortment of other tasks, like video encoding and audio processing for the speakers to give them a wider soundstage. Those speakers are louder, too.

Fifth: a big upgrade for the trackpad. It’s way bigger now, though not quite as big as what you’ll find on a MacBook Pro. More importantly, it has the unfortunately named “Force Touch” feature, which means you can press down anywhere on the pad to get a satisfying click. You might not think your MacBook Air’s trackpad was bad, but trust me, this is so much nicer.

Sixth is just overall build quality. This laptop feels a lot nicer than the old MacBook Air. It fits the same size screen in a smaller body, but it’s not as thin or as light as the thinnest and lightest of laptops you can get today. When the first Air came out, it amazed everybody. This one, though very well-built, does not stand out from the pack when it comes to size or weight.

Apple says it’s made of 100 percent recycled aluminum, but it feels just like any other Apple laptop. In fact, you could say it recycles a lot the design ideas from both the 12-inch MacBook and the 13-inch MacBook Pro into this Air-shaped tapered design.


Seventh and last, let’s talk about specs. The story with specs gets a little complicated because the story with Intel processors is a little complicated. The processor inside the new MacBook Air is an 8th Gen, dual-core Intel Core i5, which sounds pretty good. And it is pretty good — but not all Intel processors are created equal.

The thing that neither Apple nor Intel will make easy for you to see is that this is a “Y-series” processor, which means that it’s more of a low-power chip than what you’d get on a MacBook Pro or many Windows laptops. That detail might not matter for the average MacBook Air buyer, but it’s important for people who want a thin laptop that also happens to be powerful. I am one of those people, and I instinctively look down my nose at the Y-series.

The complicated part is that Apple doesn’t just take a chip off the line and slap it in. Instead, it does some customization. So this Y-series chip is powered up to 7 watts, which is a higher wattage than what other laptops usually do with the same processor. In other words, don’t judge this laptop by the label on its processor.

So let me just bottom line it: this new MacBook Air is faster than the old MacBook Air, but not by the kind of margin you’d expect after three years (or even one, if you happened to buy the 2017 model). You can do all of the same stuff you can do on your current Air. I have been running a half-dozen apps at a time along with more than a dozen tabs in Chrome, and everything is pretty okay. I think for what most people will do with this laptop, it’s fine. The base $1,199 model comes with 8GB of RAM (which is enough for most people) and 128GB of storage (which is not).

If you’re hoping you’ll be able to upgrade and get way faster video editing or process a ton of RAW photos at once, get a MacBook Pro. Those kinds of tasks will bring this Air to a chug and spin up those fans. I have found it to be more capable and powerful than the 12-inch MacBook, but, again, the difference is not as big as I’d hoped.

I don’t think of any of this as a problem, though — not really. The Air can do everything I want it to in my daily workflow. I just want to be clear that my daily workflow doesn’t push the limits of this processor. My guess is that if you’re still using a MacBook Air, neither does yours.

As for battery life, I am not getting Apple’s claimed 12 hours of web browsing time. (Though, to be fair, nobody I know uses a computer only to browse the web in Safari for 12 hours straight.) I’d say I’m safely getting seven hours of fairly active use: a mix of browsing, email, Slack, Twitter, some photo editing, and some more intense testing from time to time. You could probably get more than that with a little restraint, but one of those restraints would be a screen ratcheted down to a fairly dim brightness. It’s not a battery life champion, in other words, but I can almost guarantee you it’ll last longer than the decrepit battery in your current Air.


Is all of this worth $1,200? Yes. The performance and quality of this MacBook Air justify its price. Do I wish that Apple had found a way to make a slightly less expensive laptop? My answer is also yes. (I am fully aware that those two ideas conflict.) As I said, the already-existing MacBooks might better fit your needs.

The real issue here is that you can get an iPad Pro or a Windows Laptop or even a Chromebook for less money that does almost everything this thing can do — almost everything. But there’s one very important thing they can’t do: run macOS.

And that’s the deal. People like the Mac. It’s great to have a computer that does all of the computer stuff you want in a way you’re familiar with. Until recently, the best computer for most people was the MacBook Air, and Apple took way too long to update it. So people have been waiting. And waiting.

Now, the wait is over. But if you were hoping that lightning would strike twice and this new MacBook Air would be as revolutionary as the old MacBook Air, well, it’s not. It’s basically a MacBook that finally includes all of the stuff that has been happening with laptops for the past few years. It is on par with the rest of the laptop world, but it hasn’t moved beyond it. Sometimes that means the fan is going to spin up on you.

If you’re the kind of person who can switch to Windows, you can find something just as good and probably a little bit faster for less money. Microsoft’s Surface Laptop 2 and Surface Pro 6, for example, are really solid. But a lot of people just want a good, modern, reliable Mac. Nothing fancy, really. They just deserve something that’s up to par.

And for those people, the ones who have been hanging on to that old MacBook Air, this is a nice upgrade. It’s par for the course — and that’s probably enough.

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Pokemon Go Sinnoh Stone: How to get Sinnoh Stone, the new Gen 4 evolution item?

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From what has been shared online, the new Gen 4 Sinnoh Stone evolution item is now available on Android and iOS.

It was added to Pokemon Go through a new update today, which also did some serious CP rebalancing.

The new Sinnoh Stone is a special new item that allows Trainers to evolve Gen 1-3 Pokemon into their Gen 4 forms.

So far, Trainers have confirmed 12 Pokemon can be evolved into their Gen 4 types right now.

This includes Rhydon evolving into Rhyperior, Magmar into Magmortar, Togetic into Togekiss, Murkrow into Honchkrow, Misdreavus into Mismagius, Gligar into Gliscor, Sneasel into Weavile, Porygon 2 into Porygon-Z, Roselia into Roserade and Dusclops into Dusknoir.

All of the above evolutions requires players having a Sinnoh Stone and 100 Candy to hand to complete the process.

HOW DO I GET A SINNOH STONE IN POKEMON GO?

From what has been shared online, there is currently only one known way to get your hands on a Sinnoh Stone.

According to those who have earned one of the special evolution items, Pokemon Go Trainers must earn a 7-day Research Breakthrough.

FIELD RESEARCH

To collect Field Research tasks, Trainers have to spin the Photo Disc at nearby PokéStops, which allows for one Field Research task per PokéStop per day.

Trainers receive a notification on the bottom-right corner of the screen when they collect or make progress in these tasks.

It should be noted that Pokemon Go players can collect and make progress on up to 3 Field Research tasks at a time.

And after you complete a task and claim its reward, you free up space to collect another task. Field research can also be discarded if they prove too difficult to complete.

Earning Stamps unlocks the Research Breakthroughs you need for the Sinnoh Stone.

You can earn up to one Stamp per day for each Field Research task you complete.

After you earn 7 Stamps, you will achieve a Research Breakthrough and receive additional rewards. – you do not receive Stamps for Special Research –

While this is the only known way to currently obtain a Sinnoh Stone, there could be others out there waiting to be discovered.

It’s still very early in the process, so fans should keep their eyes open for news on the matter.

Some Trainers are disappointed about the Sinnoh Stone availability, while others support the slow burn.

“If they made it more readily available then everyone would have every Evo and complain about them not releasing more and more,” one Trainer writes on Reddit.

“They want this to tide us over until they figure out what to do with the rest of the evolutions like leafeon and glaceon.

“If you want to complain about it, go ahead, it’s your right. Though I’m sorry it’s not handed to you on a silver platter.”

Another wave of Gen 4 Pokemon is expected to be released in the near future by Niantic, who could add more evolutions to the Sinnoh Stone at a later date.

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Phone Comparisons: Samsung Galaxy S9 vs Google Pixel 3

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Introduction

Do we have a good one for you today – the new Google Pixel 3 takes on the Samsung Galaxy S9. When it comes to looks, the Infinity Display on the Samsung Galaxy S9 with its dual-curved display and near-bezel-less look will take a bow in front of the still rather old-looking Pixel 3. Arguably, the looks of both devices have been one of the aspects most critically discussed by the tech community which is probably due to the increased competition and the higher asking prices for these two phones. Both use an OLED display, although the Galaxy S9 uses a QHD+ resolution display while the Pixel 3 is resigned to an FHD+ resolution. They both also use the same technology inside with a Snapdragon 845 and an Adreno 630 GPU. The Galaxy S9 has a few extra bells and whistles, expandable memory, and Intelligent Scanning.

These two devices are different in several ways, but also represent the lower end of their respective flagship product lines, compared to the Galaxy S9+ and the Pixel 3 XL. The displays are almost identical in size, they both use OLED technology, both are HDR10 compliant, both uses an Always on Display (AoD), and Gorilla Glass 5. They both use the same Snapdragon 845 processor and Adreno 630 GPU, the same amount of 4GB of RAM and 64GB of base internal storage (expandable in the Galaxy S9 but not in the Pixel 3). When it comes to the camera area, both use a 12.2-megapixel main camera although the Galaxy S9 offers an adaptive aperture. The Galaxy S9 features an 8-megapixel front-facing camera (FFC), while the Pixel 3 features two of them. The non-removable batteries are close in terms of capacity, both offers fast charging, and both offer quick wireless charging. Even their physical size is close to the same size, although the Galaxy S9 does weigh in at 15 grams more. They both have the usual suspects – NFC, Bluetooth v5.0, and a USB Type-C port. They both provide access to Google Pay, are IP68 certified, feature stereo speakers, a Gorilla Glass 5 build, a rear-mounted fingerprint sensor and voice assistant technologies – Bixby and Google Assistant, respectively.

Please take a careful look at the detailed specifications comparison chart below and here you will see just how these two high-end Android smartphones stack up against each other. Which one is the better purchase by offering the most technology for the least amount of money? Are you looking for a powerful phone, looks, or more features? We will attempt to answer these questions in this comparison.

Specifications

Samsung Google S9

The Samsung Galaxy ‘S’ series is the ‘bread and butter’ of the company’s mainstream smartphone portfolio. Today we are going to look at the Galaxy S9 and see how it compares to the Pixel 3, which is the basic smartphone from Google’s Pixel lineup. While the Galaxy S9 does not come with the same feature-set as the Galaxy S9 Plus, it is still a beautiful device. It has a little less RAM and only one rear camera, for example, but still shares its Adaptive Aperture feature, the same SD845 processor, Adreno 630 GPU, Hi-Res audio, stereo speakers, Intelligent Scan, Gorilla Glass 5, and wireless charging.

The Samsung Galaxy S9 comes with the best display on the market – a 5.8-inch Super AMOLED Infinity Display with an 18.5:9 aspect ratio. This taller and narrower display make movies, games, and videos more enjoyable and multi-window tasking much easier. Its QHD+ resolution produces 2960 x 1440 pixels and 570 pixels-per-inch (PPI) where you will experience vibrant colors and the blackest of blacks. The AoD is excellent, allowing the user to easily preview their notifications without turning on the phone, as well as saving on battery power.

The popular octa-core Snapdragon 845 coupled with the Adreno 630 GPU is the duo used in the majority of high-end smartphones for 2018 and the Galaxy S9 and Pixel 3 are two of them. In the Galaxy S9 it is clocked at 2.7 GHz and paired with 4GB of RAM and a base 64GB of expandable storage, although there’s also 128GB and 256GB options you can order depending on your location and carrier. When sold in some other countries the Galaxy S9 uses Samsung’s own Exynos 9810 octa-core processor clocked at 2.7 GHz along with a Mali-G72-MP18 GPU.

The camera main camera is 12-megapixel with the company’s new Super Dual Pixels and uses Phase Detection AutoFocus  (PDAF), OIS, 8x Digital Zoom, and an LED flash with the new Adaptive Aperture – this new and exciting addition allows you to adjust the aperture from a large f/1.5 for low-light conditions to a small f/2.4 for brighter conditions. The FFC uses an 8-megapixel sensor with an aperture of f/1.7, auto-HDR, and autofocus that produces excellent selfies and video chats. A 3,000 mAh capacity battery powers the Galaxy S9 and should last a full day for the average user. Charging the Galaxy S9 is easy and uses Samsung’s Adaptive Fast Charging or quick wireless charging with support for both Qi and PMA formats.

Samsung adds a lot of bloatware to its devices – some, like Samsung Pay, Intelligent Scan, Facial Recognition, Iris Scan, and heart rate monitor prove to be useful, while others like Bixby, SpO2 sensor, blood pressure monitor, DeX, and Samsung Connect might never be used by some owners. Everyone however will enjoy the new stereo speakers and look forward to a better AR Emoji program. The Galaxy S9 is available in Midnight Black, Coral Blue, Titanium Gray, Lilac Purple, Burgundy Red, and Sunset Gold – manufactures are finally realizing that users want more than simple black and white, although certain colors are dependent on location and carrier. It comes with Android 8.0 (Oreo) out of the box, although has been upgraded to Oreo 8.1. The device measures 147.6 x 68.7 x 8.4 mm and weighs in at 163 grams. It is retailing for about $800, but promotions are usually available.

Google Pixel 3

Even though it has been an entire year since the Pixel 2 was released, the Pixel 3 models feel like rushed models as they lack the looks, QHD+ on the Pixel 3 model, the RAM, expandable storage, no 3.5mm headphone jack, and an $800 price tag for the Pixel 3. Most flagships introduced in 2018 provide a dual-camera setup, but the dual-cameras here are for the front-facing camera setup, not the main. The all-glass design allows Google to include wireless charging, and the Pixel 3 features all the usual Google-related features including Google Pay, Google Assistant, Google Lens, and Google Photos. There’s an improved Active Edge, Playground, and Smart Lock, as well as an IP68 dust and water-resistance rating, and stereo speakers. You can buy it unlocked to work on any major U.S. carrier, but Verizon is still the exclusive dealer for the Pixel 3 phones.

Google increased the size of the display on both Pixel models and continues to use OLED technology. The size is 5.5-inches with Google continuing to use the FHD+ resolution of 2160 x 1080 pixels and a density of 442 PPI. Google did use the 18:9 aspect ratio this time which allows for better entertainment viewing as well as better geometric portions for multitasking. Google uses the AoD feature that makes it easier for the user to look at a notification without turning on the device, and this in turn, saves on battery. Gorilla Glass 5 protects the front of the Pixel 3.

For its processor power, Google went with a winning combo – the Snapdragon 845 quad core processor clocked at 2.5 GHz and an Adreno 630 GPU for outstanding graphics. The Pixel 3 only offers 4GB of RAM and a base of 64GB of non-expandable storage, although a 128GB model is available depending where you purchase the device. A 2,915 mAh capacity battery powers the Pixel 3 – up from 2,700 mAh capacity. When you need a fast charge, you can plug the Pixel 3 into the wall or now you can use a quick wireless charge.

Google did not seem to previously place such an emphasis on the quality of photos taken with Nexus devices, but that all changed when the company launched its Pixel brand and this continues with the Pixel 3. What is so amazing is that Google offers great photos with a single camera while most other manufacturers have moved on to dual-cameras. It still uses  a single 12.2-megapixel sensor with the f/1.8 aperture, OIS, and laser and PDAF, dual LED flash, and auto HDR. This year the FFC uses a dual camera setup that features auto-HDR – there are two 8-megapixels sensors – one is a wide angle with PDAF and an f/1.8 aperture and the second sensor is an ultra-wide angle with an f/2.2 aperture and no autofocus.

The new Google Pixel 3 is a solid built device that can hold its own against other mid-range to high-end smartphones, although its tech is shallow and short-lived. Shallow in that it only has an FHD+ display,  4GB of RAM, and 64GB of non-expandable storage. It can hold its own with the best processor and GPU out in 2018 and it receives the fastest Google updates. This brings up another shallow point – because of the fall arrival of the Google Pixel 3, the processor will soon feel outdated when the spring models from other manufacturers arrive. While there is only a single main camera, there is a dual front-facing camera setup. Google added wireless charging since the front and back are made from Gorilla Glass 5. It features an improved Google Lens and Active Edge. The device has no 3.5mm headphone jack but provides stereo speakers on the front. The Pixel 3 measures 145.6 x 68.2 x 7.9mm and weighs in at 148 grams. It is available in three colors – Just Black, Clearly White, and Not Pink. The Pixel 3 will cost about $800 with 64GB of storage and is available for purchase from the Google Store, Best Buy and as a wireless carrier exclusive through Verizon.

…And The Winner Is…

I have to pick the Galaxy S9 as the winner of this comparison. Other than getting fast operating system updates and the dual FFCs, the Pixel 3 has nothing over the Galaxy S9. The Galaxy S9 has a better look with its Infinity Display and near-bezel-less display, not to mention it has a QHD+ resolution. It has expandable storage, Samsung Pay, a 3.5mm headphone jack, Hi-Res Audio, Intelligent Scan, Heart Rate Monitor, SpO2 sensor, Samsung Connect, and DeX support.

The Pixel 3 does run a lighter version of Android and does get the fastest updates. The Pixel 3 does also have Photobooth, Top Shot, Super Rez Zoom, Wide Angle Selfies, and an improved Google Lens. However, when you consider the extras from the Galaxy S9 for the same price, why would you want to look anywhere else?

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All The New Gen 4 Evolutions Available Right Now In 'Pokémon GO'

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DusknoirCredit: Bulbapedia/The Pokemon Company

If you’ve been hoarding candy, now is the time to spend some of it. Niantic just dropped another wave of new Gen 4 Pokémon into Pokémon GO, only this time things are a little bit different. None of these creatures have been released into the wild: they’re all evolutions of earlier Pokémon that didn’t arrive in the mainline games until Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, of which there are actually quite a few. We’ve already technically seen one such Pokémon in the form of Budzel, but that’s a pre-evolution. The new creatures added to the game today are all more powerful than their older counterparts.

Here are the evolutions currently spawning, credit as always to the tireless data collectors at Silph Road:

  • Rhydon-Rhyperior

  • Magmar-Magmortar

  • Electabuzz-Electivire

  • Misdreavus-Mismagus

  • Gligar-Gliscor

  • Porygon2-PorygonZ

  • Murkrow-Honchkrow

  • Sneasel-Weavile

  • Roselia-Roserade

  • Togetic-Togekiss

  • Dusclops-Dusknoir

Note that the following Pokémon do not yet evolve:

  • Eevee-Leafeon/Glaceon

  • Aipom

  • Nosepass

  • Kirlia-Gallade

  • Lickitung

  • Magneton

  • Tangela

  • Yanma

  • Piloswine

  • Snorunt-Froslass

All of these new evolutions take 100 candies, and in the case of third-tier evolutions, the previous tier has been reduced to 25 candies. So, as an example, it will only take 25 candies to evolve a Duskull into a Dusclops. I had been aiming for 400 for all of these as a sort of project, so I’m goon on candies just now.

That’s not all they’ll take, however. They also require a special item called a Sinnoh Stone, which has just gone up to being the rarest item in the game. We’re still gathering data on that, but so far the only way to get them appears to be through the 7-day field research breakthrough. That means it’s going to take a long time to collect all of these, so don’t sweat it if you don’t have the candies yet. You’ll get them eventually.

Stay tuned for more info on these as we figure it out. Also note that a bunch of Porygon, Magby and Rhyhorn will all be appearing in 2km eggs from now until November 27. So if you’re not already drowning in 2 years’ worth of candies from those, you should be able to snag some more by doing some walking/shelling out for some incubators.

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DusknoirCredit: Bulbapedia/The Pokemon Company

If you’ve been hoarding candy, now is the time to spend some of it. Niantic just dropped another wave of new Gen 4 Pokémon into Pokémon GO, only this time things are a little bit different. None of these creatures have been released into the wild: they’re all evolutions of earlier Pokémon that didn’t arrive in the mainline games until Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, of which there are actually quite a few. We’ve already technically seen one such Pokémon in the form of Budzel, but that’s a pre-evolution. The new creatures added to the game today are all more powerful than their older counterparts.

Here are the evolutions currently spawning, credit as always to the tireless data collectors at Silph Road:

  • Rhydon-Rhyperior

  • Magmar-Magmortar

  • Electabuzz-Electivire

  • Misdreavus-Mismagus

  • Gligar-Gliscor

  • Porygon2-PorygonZ

  • Murkrow-Honchkrow

  • Sneasel-Weavile

  • Roselia-Roserade

  • Togetic-Togekiss

  • Dusclops-Dusknoir

Note that the following Pokémon do not yet evolve:

  • Eevee-Leafeon/Glaceon

  • Aipom

  • Nosepass

  • Kirlia-Gallade

  • Lickitung

  • Magneton

  • Tangela

  • Yanma

  • Piloswine

  • Snorunt-Froslass

All of these new evolutions take 100 candies, and in the case of third-tier evolutions, the previous tier has been reduced to 25 candies. So, as an example, it will only take 25 candies to evolve a Duskull into a Dusclops. I had been aiming for 400 for all of these as a sort of project, so I’m goon on candies just now.

That’s not all they’ll take, however. They also require a special item called a Sinnoh Stone, which has just gone up to being the rarest item in the game. We’re still gathering data on that, but so far the only way to get them appears to be through the 7-day field research breakthrough. That means it’s going to take a long time to collect all of these, so don’t sweat it if you don’t have the candies yet. You’ll get them eventually.

Stay tuned for more info on these as we figure it out. Also note that a bunch of Porygon, Magby and Rhyhorn will all be appearing in 2km eggs from now until November 27. So if you’re not already drowning in 2 years’ worth of candies from those, you should be able to snag some more by doing some walking/shelling out for some incubators.

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