RCMP identify suspect in Sherwood Park explosions as Kane Kosolowsky - Canadanewsmedia
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RCMP identify suspect in Sherwood Park explosions as Kane Kosolowsky

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Kane Kosolowsky.


Facebook / EDMwp

“Out of character.”

Those were the words a grieving family used Thursday to describe the actions of Kane Kosolowsky, the suspect linked to a pair of explosions in a Sherwood Park parkade earlier this week.

Even the family says it has no idea what drove the 21-year-old to do what he did Tuesday night in the multi-level parking area of the Strathcona County Community Centre.

At this stage, nor do the RCMP.

“We … are shocked and devastated by the unfortunate incident,” said a statement issued by the RCMP on behalf of unnamed family members.

“We are thankful that there were no other persons harmed in this unexpected incident.

“The events that occurred are totally out of character for Kane and we trust that the authorities will continue a thorough investigation to provide the answers we are all seeking.”

Officers found a severely injured Kosolowsky in the community centre parkade at around 6:15 p.m. Tuesday, not long after reports of an explosion and a fire.

He was rushed to hospital where he later died.

Autopsy results released Thursday revealed he died from a gunshot wound. Police say they are not looking for any further suspects.

Few details about Kosolowsky’s life have so far trickled out.

A court record search showed he had no criminal record in Edmonton. His social media accounts show that he liked the gym and he liked cars.

About two hours after the first explosion, a second one shook the building prompting evacuations of neighbouring buildings including Festival Place, county hall, an aged care facility and Salisbury Composite High School.

Salisbury Composite and nearby St. Theresa’s Catholic school remained off-limits to students Thursday but were scheduled to reopen Friday along with Festival Place.

There was no known threat to any schools in the surrounding areas, police said.

The community centre parkade is still a crime scene but roadblocks in the area are expected to be removed soon. Additional investigation into the explosions inside the parkade is anticipated to take several days.

Despite the fact the explosive disposal unit and RCMP special tactical operations unit have deemed the area outside of the parkade safe, county hall will remain closed until late next week.

An initial structural survey has been conducted but there is no timeline on when the community centre will open again.

While Mounties have not identified any motive for the attack, the fact the RCMP major crimes unit is leading the investigation, rather than the force’s integrated national security enforcement team (INSET), offers some indication of law enforcement thinking.

RCMP K Division spokesman Fraser Logan said the major crimes unit is handling the investigation because “there is no indication that this incident is related to any group or ideology.”

“The major crimes unit will continue to work through partners, such as INSET, to ensure we investigate all avenues as thoroughly as possible.”

Strathcona County set up a phone number for people with vehicles still in the parkade to contact.

Anyone trying to retrieve their vehicles is asked to call 780-417-7100.

“County departments continue to ensure that essential services are delivered to our community,” Strathcona County Mayor Rod Frank said Thursday in a statement.

“In that regard, we appreciate our residents’ flexibility with respect to how and where they access these services.”

jwakefield@postmedia.comjgraney@postmedia.com

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Longtime public voice of the TTC stepping down to take role with city

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Chris Fox, CP24.com</span>


Published Wednesday, November 14, 2018 10:17AM EST


Last Updated Wednesday, November 14, 2018 10:51AM EST

The longtime public voice of the TTC is stepping aside to take on a newly-created role with the city.

Brad Ross announced on Wednesday morning that he will step down as the TTC’s executive director of corporate communications in order to become the new Chief Communications Officer for the City of Toronto.

His last day on the job at the TTC will be Dec. 14 and his first day on the job at the city will be Jan. 7.

“As a teenager from Scarborough, I took the TTC everywhere – school, part-time jobs, concerts, the mall, Yonge St. pinball arcades. It was a lifeline. It’s crazy to me that a few decades later I became the TTC’s go-to for public explanations,” Ross said in a series of messages posted to Twitter. “It has been a humbling experience to play that role. I’ll miss it.”

Ross first joined the TTC back in 2008 after spending eight years as the manager of media relations and issues management at the city.

While at the TTC Ross became a familiar voice and was often thrust into the spotlight at trying times as he was called on to offer up explanations for subway delays, overcrowding issues and a myriad of other controversies that popped up from time to time.

He also gained a loyal following on Twitter, where he shared updates on issues affecting commuters  with his 30,000 followers and even offered the occasional joke. When someone placed their live crabs on a subway seat this past spring, Ross quipped that it was “shellfish behaviour.”

In a series of messages posted to Twitter on Wednesday, Ross said that he is “proud” to have played a part in what he called the “daily miracle” of getting Torontonians to where they need to go.

He said that the city is lucky to have “incredibly smart and good people leading the TTC,” something that he said will continue to be the case.

“From operators to stations staff to planners to special constables to HR professionals to mechanics and especially to my colleagues in comms, a very big thank you,” he said.

According to a news release from the city, Ross will be “responsible for communicating the overall strategic direction for the City of Toronto, as well as making sure the public clearly understands council’s priorities and how to access city programs and services.”

The city says that Ross was selected for the new role following a “comprehensive search.”

“Brad brings a wealth of experience to lead our professional communications staff in the development of internal and external communications strategies, public education campaigns, digital outreach and more,” City Manager Chris Murray said in the news release. “He is a champion of best practices, has deep relationships with the media, can capably manage emerging situations and will be a great steward of the city’s brand. I’m elated to have him return to the city in this key leadership role."

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2 teens arrested in death of 17-year-old from Nuns' Island

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Montreal police have arrested two teens, a boy and a girl, in connection with the death of a 17-year-old, whose body was found in a wooded area on Nuns' Island earlier this week.

The two teens, who are also 17, are expected to appear in youth court in Montreal later today. They are expected to face charges of armed robbery and second-degree murder.

It's unclear if the suspects knew the victim or not. The teen's death is the 27th homicide in Montreal this year. 

Police initially said they believed his death was an accident. A passerby found his body Monday morning. 

Tuesday evening, they revealed his death was a homicide and that he had been stabbed in the lower body.

The investigation was transferred to Montreal police's major crimes unit and the suspects were arrested later Tuesday evening. 

A Nuns' Island Islamic community centre created an online fundraiser to help the victim's mother with funeral costs. It is also holding a gathering in his honour Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Al Jazira Islamic Centre.

He lived in Nuns' Island and worked at the local Tim Hortons and IGA grocery store while studying in CEGEP, according to community members who knew him. 

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Don't call it a party: Graydon Pelley walks away from PCs, starting new political group

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Graydon Pelley is walking away from the PC Party of Newfoundland and Labrador and starting a new political party, with the goal of forming the provincial government in the 2019 election. 

Graydon Pelley has resigned as president of Newfoundland and Labrador's PCs. (Graydon Pelley/Twitter)

"Over the last little while I feel that we are not seeing that move toward real change that people want," Pelley told CBC Radio's St. John's Morning Show.

"I feel people are fed up with the way that party politics is operating in our province."

The now former president of the PC Party is calling the new party NL Alliance, and Pelley is seeking the required number of people to join him to officially register for the 2019 ballot. 

According to Elections Newfoundland and Labrador, before a political party can be registered, it must:

  • Submit an application.
  • Submit a signed petition with a minimum of 1,000 names of eligible electors that can attest to the existence of the political party.
  • Appoint both a chief financial officer (CFO) and auditor.
  • Provide a mandatory audited statement of the assets and liabilities as of a date not earlier than 90 days prior to the date of application for registration and attested to by the CFO.

A party is not an officially registered party until the chief electoral officer has approved the application.

Political parties in the province have lost focus on representing the people, according to Pelley. Ideas, regardless of whether they are good or bad, will by default be argued against by an opposing party, he said.  

"That needs to change and we need to focus on the people." 

No animosity, just change

Pelley said he's staying away from the word "party" in his new political adventure. He said he hasn't had a falling out with any party in particular, but just wants to see change in politics in the province.

Pelley says his plan is to have NL Alliance on the ballot for the next election. (CBC)

"Change has to start somewhere, and I believe that change has to start with somebody who's out there, who's involved with people, who's very community oriented, who has no hidden agendas, no hidden interests in getting involved in politics," he said.

According to Pelley, he would like to be an elected member to the new party and to sit in the House of Assembly, but he's just as content with starting the party and working behind the scenes.

"It's not about me. It's about the people of the province," he said. 

"I'm certainly willing to do whatever my role would be to make to make this work, and to better the province of Newfoundland and Labrador."

With files from the St. John's Morning Show

Read more articles from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador     

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