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12-year-old charged with uttering threats after social media post: Regina police – CBC.ca

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A 12-year-old has been charged with uttering threats after a student at a school in Regina’s Al Ritchie neighbourhood was threatened on social media, according to police.

A school resource officer received a call from a principal at the school about the alleged threats on Friday.

Officers quickly determined the victim was not in imminent danger, and the youth accused of making the threats was not at the school in question. 

Police say they learned the student at the school was threatened via social media, in a post that included images of the 12-year-old accused with what appeared to be a firearm.

They  determined the 12-year-old who made the post and victim were known to each other. Police located the youth at a different location and arrested him, but were unable to locate a firearm, according to a Friday news release.

The youth now faces charges related to uttering threats and cannot be identified under the Youth Criminal Justice Act, which allows criminal charges to be laid against minors as young as 12. 

He will appear in court on Monday.

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Kenney downplays apparent UCP disharmony after government MLAs take to social media – CTV Edmonton

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EDMONTON —
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is downplaying apparent disharmony inside his governing United Conservative Party after multiple elected officials took to social media criticizing the province’s reopening plan. 

On Tuesday, at least five government members of legislative assembly posted similarly-worded statements to social media. All of them expressed frustration that more restrictions weren’t lifted Tuesday despite the province being below a number of previously-stated benchmarks.

“Many people have questions about some of the inconsistent rules and moving goalposts,” Barnes wrote. “I know this and other issues have shaken the trust of Albertans.” 

Barnes also noted he heard about the limited reopening plans on social media, “the same time and way as most Albertans did.” 

Other government MLAs Ron Orr, Michaela Glasgo, Angela Pitt and Todd Loewen all posted similar messages to their social media, calling for looser restrictions and a regional reopening plan.

“I will take the concerns of my constituents back to the government in hopes it will make a difference,” reads the end of the statements posted by Barnes.

On Wednesday, Kenney said there’s “an ongoing debate” within the government caucus about the best COVID-19 response. 

“I welcome input from MLA’s of both parties,” said Kenney. “I’m not at all surprised that Albertans have a range of opinions on the right response to COVID, that’s been the case fromday one.”

“There’s quite a diversity of views there at the end of the day, the government is responsible for taking the expert public health advice of the chief medical officer and her team closely, studying the data, and making difficult decisions.” 

He noted had avoided lockdown measures like curfews and shelter in place orders seen in the United States and Europe. 

“I would say Alberta’s done a good job of balancing the different and very serious issues here.”

In February, Kenney rejected the idea of a regional reopening plan. 

“Transmission can happen very fast and we have to look at the broader trends — yes, in the regions, but also the whole province,” Kenney said on Feb. 11.

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Kenney downplays apparent UCP disharmony after government MLAs take to social media – CTV Edmonton

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EDMONTON —
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is downplaying apparent disharmony inside his governing United Conservative Party after multiple elected officials took to social media criticizing the province’s reopening plan. 

On Tuesday, at least five government members of legislative assembly posted similarly-worded statements to social media. All of them expressed frustration that more restrictions weren’t lifted Tuesday despite the province being below a number of previously-stated benchmarks.

“Many people have questions about some of the inconsistent rules and moving goalposts,” Barnes wrote. “I know this and other issues have shaken the trust of Albertans.” 

Barnes also noted he heard about the limited reopening plans on social media, “the same time and way as most Albertans did.” 

Other government MLAs Ron Orr, Michaela Glasgo, Angela Pitt and Todd Loewen all posted similar messages to their social media, calling for looser restrictions and a regional reopening plan.

“I will take the concerns of my constituents back to the government in hopes it will make a difference,” reads the end of the statements posted by Barnes.

On Wednesday, Kenney said there’s “an ongoing debate” within the government caucus about the best COVID-19 response. 

“I welcome input from MLA’s of both parties,” said Kenney. “I’m not at all surprised that Albertans have a range of opinions on the right response to COVID, that’s been the case fromday one.”

“There’s quite a diversity of views there at the end of the day, the government is responsible for taking the expert public health advice of the chief medical officer and her team closely, studying the data, and making difficult decisions.” 

He noted had avoided lockdown measures like curfews and shelter in place orders seen in the United States and Europe. 

“I would say Alberta’s done a good job of balancing the different and very serious issues here.”

In February, Kenney rejected the idea of a regional reopening plan. 

“Transmission can happen very fast and we have to look at the broader trends — yes, in the regions, but also the whole province,” Kenney said on Feb. 11.

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Singapore police investigate lawmaker over sign supporting hawkers: media – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Police in Singapore are investigating whether a parliamentarian broke a strict public order law after he held up a placard that called for support for local food businesses, local media reported on Wednesday.

Lawmaker Louis Ng posted four pictures on Facebook last June of himself with hawkers at a Singapore food centre, holding a piece of paper that read “support them” followed by a smiley face.

Organising or taking part in a public assembly without a police permit in Singapore is illegal, even if a demonstration is by only one person. Breaking the law can lead to a fine of up to S$5,000 ($3,760).

“The police have been looking into a possible offence of public assembly without permit by Member of Parliament Mr Louis Ng,” police said in a statement. “We have already interviewed Mr. Ng. Police investigations are ongoing.”

The police did not give further details. However, Ng, a member of the ruling People’s Action Party, referred to the incident in a Facebook post on Wednesday and said he had provided a statement to police.

“I wanted to urge our residents to support our hawkers and held a sign indicating this and took photos together with the hawkers,” he said on Facebook.

Last year, Singapore charged activist Jolovan Wham for staging a one-man protest without a permit over an incident in which he held up a sign bearing a crudely drawn smiley face outside a police station.

($1 = 1.3298 Singapore dollars)

(Reporting by Chen Lin; Editing by Martin Petty and Ed Davies)

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