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13 Ottawa pharmacies to begin offering COVID-19 tests Friday – CBC.ca

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Thirteen Ottawa pharmacies will begin offering free COVID-19 tests Friday to people who have no symptoms of the viral illness, the province says.

Last week, Premier Doug Ford announced the province would be allowing pharmacists to perform the tests in order to alleviate some of the pressures facing Ontario’s existing COVID-19 assessment centres.

Long lineups have been a major problem recently at Ottawa’s test sites, with stories of people waiting more than four hours for a throat or nose swab.

As of Sept. 25, the following pharmacies in Ottawa will be offering tests:

  • Cedarview Pharmacy, 12-4100 Strandherd Dr.
  • Medicine Shoppe, 19-5303 Canotek Rd.
  • Rexall, 1615 Orléans Blvd.
  • Shoppers Drug Mart, 1-2148 Carling Ave.
  • Shoppers Drug Mart, 1309 Carling Ave.
  • Shoppers Drug Mart, 1102 Klondike Rd.
  • Shoppers Drug Mart, 1937 Portobello Blvd.
  • Shoppers Drug Mart, 2954 St. Joseph Blvd.
  • Shoppers Drug Mart, 3940 Innes Rd.
  • Shoppers Drug Mart, 541 Montreal Rd.
  • Shoppers Drug Mart, 455 Bank St.
  • Shoppers Drug Mart, 647 Earl Armstrong Rd.
  • Shoppers Drug Mart, 1180 Walkley Rd.

Friday ambitious for some pharmacies 

The Ontario Pharmacists Association warned not all the pharmacies identified for testing in Ontario will be prepared to start Friday.  

“It may not be [that] all stores [are] ready to go immediately as stores adjust to the necessary precautions and changes they might need to make to their workflow,” said board of directors chair Jen Baker on Wednesday. 

Those precautions include proper cleaning, directional signs, making a separate space for the test and ensuring the right personal protective equipment is in place. Stores will also have to perform a pre-screening process to make sure only asymptomatic people are being tested.

“There will be funding associated with performing the COVID-19 testing in the pharmacies, so that could be used to hire additional staff…should they find that they need to, in order to accommodate the demand in the community.” 

Baker said pharmacies are also busy trying to figure out how to implement COVID-19 testing and the flu shot program at the same time. She said many pharmacies are opting to do appointments for flu shots too and looking at other management programs such as allocating certain times of day for each service.  

Anyone seeking a COVID-19 test must first make an appointment. More locations will be announced in the coming weeks, the province said Wednesday.

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Cenovus to cut up to 25% of workforce after merger with Husky – Financial Post

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Article content continued

“As with any merger of this type, there will be overlap and there will be some difficult decisions as we work to create a combined organization best positioned for the future,” Husky spokeswoman Kim Guttormson said.

Cenovus spokesman Reg Curren also confirmed the cuts.

Guttormson added that many details had yet to be determined as part of the integration planning process and the transaction has not yet closed.

The $3.8 billion combination announced on Sunday, the largest Canadian oil and gas deal in nearly four years based on enterprise value, may pressure peers to get bigger or sell.

Half of the $1.2 billion in targeted savings will be achieved through job cuts and reductions in corporate overhead costs, including streamlined IT systems and procurement savings, the companies said.

Rival producer Suncor Energy Inc this month said it would cut up to 15 per cent of its workforce over the next year and a half, while Exxon Mobil Corp was expected to cut jobs soon in the United States and Canada.

© Thomson Reuters 2020

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Cenovus to cut up to 25% of combined workforce with Husky Energy after merger – CBC.ca

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The $3.8-billion merger between Cenovus Energy and Husky Energy will result in a trimming of the workforce by as much as 25 per cent, CBC News has confirmed.

“The estimate is that the reductions will be approximately 20 per cent to 25 per cent of the combined workforce, which is about 8,600 employees and contractors,” Reg Curren, senior media advisor for Cenovus, said in an email to CBC News on Tuesday, two days after the merger was announced.

The majority of the job cuts of 1,720 to 2,150 positions are expected to take place in Calgary, where both firms are headquartered.

The new company will operate as Cenovus Energy and will be based out of Calgary.

“As with any merger of this type, there will be overlap and there will be some difficult decisions as we work to create a combined organization best positioned for the future,” Kim Guttormson, communications manager at Husky, said in an emailed statement.

Deal generally applauded 

Cenovus CEO Alex Pourbaix said his company’s merger with rival Husky would create a new entity that’s stronger, more resilient and operating with ‘significantly reduced’ risk to market volatility. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

Cenovus CEO Alex Pourbaix said the merger would create a new entity that’s stronger, more resilient and operating with “significantly reduced” risk to market volatility.

His counterpart at Husky, CEO Rob Peabody, said the deal would allow the combined companies to “make better returns in a tougher environment.”

Analysts generally applauded the surprise Cenovus-Husky hookup for its operational advantages but criticized the plus-20-per-cent premium in the price for Husky.

Husky Energy president and CEO Robert Peabody said the two companies have talked about a merger for several years, but discussions picked up in March. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

“The deal does make strategic sense,” said Manav Gupta of Credit Suisse in a note to investors.

“Like U.S. E&P (exploration and production companies), Canadian energy companies also need to come together, cut costs and become leaner to better adapt to lower energy demand in [a] post-pandemic world.”

Both companies are carrying a relatively hefty amount of debt and that’s why joining forces made financial sense. 

While the oilpatch has struggled for many years, this deal is happening in a remarkably unique time in the industry, with many companies bleeding money with historically low oil prices that even turned negative this year.

The oil pipeline and tank storage facilities at the Husky Energy oil terminal in Hardisty, Alta. Husky’s CEO says the combined company will be better able to achieve climate targets, such as the goal to have net-zero emissions by 2050. (Larry MacDougal/The Canadian Press)

Cenovus shares fell by as much as 15 per cent to $4.15 in Monday trading in Toronto before closing down 8.4 per cent at $4.47.

Husky, meanwhile, gained as much as 14.2 per cent to $3.62 before closing up 12 per cent at $3.55

Earlier in 2020, Cenovus and Husky shares had lost 63 per cent and 70 per cent of their value, respectively.

Cenovus expects to find savings of $1.2 billion.

More mega-mergers likely, analyst says

The all-share deal will likely spark more mega-mergers among Canadian oil and gas majors, according to a veteran oilsands analyst.

“This is likely just the start of big deals in Canadian energy land and thus it begs the question of who is next?” said analyst Phil Skolnick of Eight Capital in a report on Monday.

“As seen in the U.S. with the accelerated M&A activity, when there’s one meaningful transaction, there’s likely more to come.”

Several industry observers point to Calgary-based oilsands producer MEG Energy Inc. as the leading potential target, noting Husky’s failed $3.3-billion hostile takeover attempt of its smaller rival two years ago.

The Husky-Cenovus merger calls for Husky shareholders to receive 0.7845 of a Cenovus share plus 0.0651 of a Cenovus share purchase warrant in exchange for each Husky common share if the deal is concluded.

Cenovus shareholders would own about 61 per cent of the combined company and Husky shareholders about 39 per cent.

The transaction must be approved by at least two-thirds of Husky’s shareholders but Hong Kong billionaire Li Ka-Shing controls 70 per cent of Husky’s shares and has agreed to vote them in favour of the deal.  

Third-quarter results expected this week

The announcement Sunday came just as Calgary’s oilsands companies are about to start rolling out third-quarter financial results, with Suncor Energy Inc. set to report Wednesday and both Cenovus and Husky scheduled to report on Thursday.

Alberta Energy Minister Sonya Savage said in a statement that she predicts opponents of Canada’s energy sector will “seize upon today’s news.”

“But projections show continued global demand for fossil fuels well into the future,” she said. “We believe that Canada should not cede that market to countries like Russia and Saudi Arabia.”

“As companies across the globe navigate unprecedented economic times, job restructurings are an unfortunate reality of weathering the storm. 

More Alberta business news:

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Cenovus to cut up to 25% of combined workforce with Husky Energy after merger – CBC.ca

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The $3.8-billion merger between Cenovus Energy and Husky Energy will result in a trimming of the workforce by as much as 25 per cent, CBC News has confirmed.

“The estimate is that the reductions will be approximately 20 per cent to 25 per cent of the combined workforce, which is about 8,600 employees and contractors,” Reg Curren, senior media advisor for Cenovus, said in an email to CBC News on Tuesday, two days after the merger was announced.

The majority of the job cuts of 1,720 to 2,150 positions are expected to take place in Calgary, where both firms are headquartered.

The new company will operate as Cenovus Energy and will be based out of Calgary.

“As with any merger of this type, there will be overlap and there will be some difficult decisions as we work to create a combined organization best positioned for the future,” Kim Guttormson, communications manager at Husky, said in an emailed statement.

Cenovus CEO Alex Pourbaix said his company’s merger with rival Husky would create a new entity that’s stronger, more resilient and operating with ‘significantly reduced’ risk to market volatility. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

Cenovus CEO Alex Pourbaix said the merger would create a new entity that’s stronger, more resilient and operating with “significantly reduced” risk to market volatility.

His counterpart at Husky, CEO Rob Peabody, said the deal would allow the combined companies to “make better returns in a tougher environment.”

Husky Energy president and CEO Robert Peabody said the two companies have talked about a merger for several years, but discussions picked up in March. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

Analysts generally applauded the surprise Cenovus-Husky hookup for its operational advantages but criticized the plus-20-per-cent premium in the price for Husky.

“The deal does make strategic sense,” said Manav Gupta of Credit Suisse in a note to investors.

“Like U.S. E&P (exploration and production companies), Canadian energy companies also need to come together, cut costs and become leaner to better adapt to lower energy demand in [a] post-pandemic world.”

Both companies are carrying a relatively hefty amount of debt and that’s why joining forces made financial sense. 

While the oilpatch has struggled for many years, this deal is happening in a remarkably unique time in the industry, with many companies bleeding money with historically low oil prices that even turned negative this year.

The oil pipeline and tank storage facilities at the Husky Energy oil terminal in Hardisty, Alta. Husky’s CEO says the combined company will be better able to achieve climate targets, such as the goal to have net-zero emissions by 2050. (Larry MacDougal/The Canadian Press)

Cenovus shares fell by as much as 15 per cent to $4.15 in Monday trading in Toronto before closing down 8.4 per cent at $4.47.

Husky, meanwhile, gained as much as 14.2 per cent to $3.62 before closing up 12 per cent at $3.55

Earlier in 2020, Cenovus and Husky shares had lost 63 per cent and 70 per cent of their value, respectively.

Cenovus expects to find savings of $1.2 billion.

The all-share deal will likely spark more mega-mergers among Canadian oil and gas majors, according to a veteran oilsands analyst.

“This is likely just the start of big deals in Canadian energy land and thus it begs the question of who is next?” said analyst Phil Skolnick of Eight Capital in a report on Monday.

“As seen in the U.S. with the accelerated M&A activity, when there’s one meaningful transaction, there’s likely more to come.”

Several industry observers point to Calgary-based oilsands producer MEG Energy Inc. as the leading potential target, noting Husky’s failed $3.3-billion hostile takeover attempt of its smaller rival two years ago.

The Husky-Cenovus merger calls for Husky shareholders to receive 0.7845 of a Cenovus share plus 0.0651 of a Cenovus share purchase warrant in exchange for each Husky common share if the deal is concluded.

Cenovus shareholders would own about 61 per cent of the combined company and Husky shareholders about 39 per cent.

The transaction must be approved by at least two-thirds of Husky’s shareholders but Hong Kong billionaire Li Ka-Shing controls 70 per cent of Husky’s shares and has agreed to vote them in favour of the deal.

The announcement Sunday came just as Calgary’s oilsands companies are about to start rolling out third-quarter financial results, with Suncor Energy Inc. set to report Wednesday and both Cenovus and Husky scheduled to report on Thursday.

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