Edmonton Digital Arts College closure 'devastating' to staff and students - Edmonton Journal - Canadanewsmedia
Connect with us

Arts

Edmonton Digital Arts College closure 'devastating' to staff and students – Edmonton Journal

Published

on



Owen Brierley is owner and executive director of Edmonton Digital Arts College, which has suspended classes due to financial troubles.


Larry Wong / Postmedia, file

The Edmonton Digital Arts College (EDAC) is shutting its doors after an 11th-hour effort to find an unnamed buyer failed to keep the school open, EDAC executive director and owner Owen Brierley confirmed Tuesday.

“The tech and creative industry in Alberta is going to suffer for a while,” said instructor Logan Foster.

Some staff have offered to volunteer to review final portfolios so that students who enrolled in September will still be able to graduate, but students who began later will need to enrol at another college to complete their training.

Brierley said the classrooms will remain open “to make sure the students have what they need to finish.”

Students in the April cohort who are not placed at another institution may apply to the financial security held by the Private Career Colleges branch for tuition refunds.

There are comparable programs at other educational institutions in the city, but Foster said none of them offer the same educational experience at the same pace.

“There isn’t another school out there that does this work to the capabilities and quality level that we were,” he said.

“The content alone of the program is miles ahead of what other schools have to offer in Edmonton, and that’s due to the hard work that instructors put in,” said student Allison Arnold.

“It’s devastating to lose this community,” said Arnold.

“The experience that I had just made me want to come back and learn more. It’s worth the price. It’s a real shame that it’s come to this. EDAC made Edmonton a great place for people who want to get into this industry,” said student Trystin Rosenberger.

Foster said the school’s closure will leave a huge gap for both employers and students.

“I think the entire staff is very upset about it. We’d all worked very hard to produce an amazing program at the school. So we were very shocked and surprised — we’ve gone through a range of emotions. (We are) disappointed that we’re not going to be able to help these students out. Because very much they are family to us,” said Foster.

The private college relied entirely on tuition fees to operate, and financial pressures became too much too bear.

“To single out one source as to why this happened is to blame the last straw for breaking the camel’s back. It is subject to the market fluctuations of the day and that can get pretty intense,” Brierley said.

In four 10-month program streams, the college taught more than 56 students and employed six teachers, four teaching assistants, and three administration staff. The school is still planning a graduation ceremony with the help of community partners on July 31, he said.

“I’m really proud of the work that everyone has done. It’s a sad and hard situation to work through, but at the same time, I have wonderful memories of this time. It was my heart and soul for a decade,” said Brierley.

lijohnson@postmedia.com

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Arts

Culinary arts programs on the chopping block to save Vancouver School Board money – CTV News

Published

on

By


Luisa Alvarez, CTV News Vancouver


Published Saturday, November 16, 2019 7:12PM PST

VANCOUVER – Whisking together new recipes and learning from a red seal chef is an experience currently offered at seven Vancouver high schools that are equipped with teaching cafeterias.

A new report examining ways for the Vancouver School Board to save money suggests reducing that number to just two, plus one to be built in a future “centre of excellence” that would be built under the provincial seismic program.

Supporters of culinary arts programs in Vancouver schools say this is the wrong approach.

“There isn’t a single teaching cafeteria west of Main Street, so every student west of Main Street in high school has to actually travel by bus or car to one of the schools that have it,” said Bill Tieleman, spokesperson for the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 963, representing school cafeteria employees and chefs.

“We have an enormous shortage of chefs of cafeteria workers everything in the restaurant and foodservice industry. They should really be looking at expanding this program not cutting it,” Tieleman said.

Annalida Leung, a trade-qualified baker, is a teacher with the program. While her job would be at risk with the change, she says she’s more concerned about the students.

“For students that don’t really know what they want to do, this is one way for us to kind of give them that road map of if they like to cook or if they like to bake, kind of spark that passion,” said Leung.

The report also recommends modifying the hot lunch program at Vancouver elementary schools, replacing it with delivered food that would be prepared off-site.

Krista Sigurdson, chair of the Lord Strathcona Elementary Parent Advisory Council, has concerns.

“If off-site delivery were to be done and privatization were to occur, we have less assurance of adherence to food guidelines,” Sigurdson said. “It’s an issue of control. The further the VSB loses control over the food, the less regulation there is going to be potentially over the quality.”

She’s also worried it could single students out.

“Offsite delivery would potentially only target kids in need, effectively differentiating poor kids from their healthier counterparts,” said Sigurdson.

“The last thing we need to do is have people signaled out because of their socioeconomic problems that they have a meal delivered to them and everyone sees it,” said Tieleman.

Nothing is set in stone, the VSB says, adding it won’t make any decisions without consulting parents, teachers and students.

“A number of factors were considered in the report,” said VSB trustee and chair Janet Fraser. “A number of options were put forward, it’s up to the board to decide how to move forward.”

Consultation is tentatively scheduled to begin in the new year.

“I’d encourage people to engage in that to let us know how we can proceed,” said Fraser. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Arts

Local man tries to keep 'Canada's original art' afloat (6 photos) – BarrieToday

Published

on

By


John Harrison wants to bring back what he views as a nearly forgotten art.

For the past eight years, the Orillia native has spent eight months a year living in the bush near Algonquin Provincial Park as he hones his skills at making traditional birch-bark canoes.

“The whole project has been about releasing a craft that’s been out of favour,” he said, noting that craft involves building canoes on the ground with three simple hand tools, sustainable harvesting and following a traditional process.

“I show my canoes and people are in amazement, but they often don’t see the art and this is the original (Canadian) art,” the 53-year-old said.

“It’s a really good project for arts, culture and history because it all ties in with that…Canadiana.”

Harrison, who has a fine arts’ university degree and is also an accomplished musician, is just finishing building 17- and 18-foot racing canoes and would now like to build a racing canoe side-wing as his next project.

“That original Canadian idea still hangs out in every canoe that you see today,” he said, noting he sold a 12-foot trapper canoe that’s now on display at Rama’s Bare Butts Smoke shop.

Harrison, who lives in a large tipi on the shores of Kimball Lake when not in the city, takes about three weeks to build a canoe.

“It takes a certain consistency of environment to produce the right tree,” Harrison said, noting he first uses a ladder to climb to an appropriate level before harvesting the bark from mature trees.

“You want 15- to 16-inch diameter (trunks) since with a tree like that you’re getting a quarter-inch of bark. I’m strictly doing a sustainable thing. I’m a surgeon when I’m on that tree and can get three canoes out of one tree. I pay homage to the tree.”

Harrison’s passion project has also led to displays, talks and workshops at Culture Days, Orillia Public Library, Rotary Club of Washago along with Cape Croker and Rama powwows.

As well, he teaches students at Rama’s Mnjikaning Kendaaswin Elementary School how to build a one-foot canoe and also wrote lesson plans for a canoe program.

“The last day, we had a regatta down the Black River. They had so much of a connection to what they built.”

But Harrison comes by his love of building Canada’s traditional watercraft honesty. His father Ron Harrison was a machine-shop teacher at Park Street Collegiate Institute from 1962 to 1995 and started the school’s Outward Bound program in the late 1960s.

“I was always around it; the essence, respect and joy of being in nature,” Harrison said, noting his father also helped students learn to build canoes.

“My father has built 86 canoes in cedar strip or fibreglass. I’ve built six, so I have a long way to go.”

Harrison has also been busy writing a collection of essays for an upcoming book entitled The Last Algonquin, which is a guide on how to build a traditional Canadian canoe that also features insights into life, Indigenous history and one’s place in nature.

“What technology utilizes birch bark’s water repellent nature, sewn in a blanket with spruce roots, structured internally with split cedar ribs, and sealed with spruce gum housing?” one essay excerpt asks before pointing out the canoe was created by combining three existing First Nations’ technologies found in other traditional items like snowshoes and toboggans “for travelling over frozen water.”

Harrison said he loves living in his tipi and being one with nature.

“I get so much peace and quiet for weeks at a time up at my site,” he said.

“I’m taught by nature and you renew your senses of sight, smell and sound. I get a better balance then when I was just living in the city.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Arts

Local man tries to keep 'Canada's original art' afloat (6 photos) – OrilliaMatters.Com

Published

on

By


John Harrison wants to bring back what he views as a nearly forgotten art.

For the past eight years, the Orillia native has spent eight months a year living in the bush near Algonquin Provincial Park as he hones his skills at making traditional birch-bark canoes.

“The whole project has been about releasing a craft that’s been out of favour,” he said, noting that craft involves building canoes on the ground with three simple hand tools, sustainable harvesting and following a traditional process.

“I show my canoes and people are in amazement, but they often don’t see the art and this is the original (Canadian) art,” the 53-year-old said.

“It’s a really good project for arts, culture and history because it all ties in with that…Canadiana.”

Harrison, who has a fine arts’ university degree and is also an accomplished musician, is just finishing building 17- and 18-foot racing canoes and would now like to build a racing canoe side-wing as his next project.

“That original Canadian idea still hangs out in every canoe that you see today,” he said, noting he sold a 12-foot trapper canoe that’s now on display at Rama’s Bare Butts Smoke shop.

Harrison, who lives in a large tipi on the shores of Kimball Lake when not in the city, takes about three weeks to build a canoe.

“It takes a certain consistency of environment to produce the right tree,” Harrison said, noting he first uses a ladder to climb to an appropriate level before harvesting the bark from mature trees.

“You want 15- to 16-inch diameter (trunks) since with a tree like that you’re getting a quarter-inch of bark. I’m strictly doing a sustainable thing. I’m a surgeon when I’m on that tree and can get three canoes out of one tree. I pay homage to the tree.”

Harrison’s passion project has also led to displays, talks and workshops at Culture Days, Orillia Public Library, Rotary Club of Washago along with Cape Croker and Rama powwows.

As well, he teaches students at Rama’s Mnjikaning Kendaaswin Elementary School how to build a one-foot canoe and also wrote lesson plans for a canoe program.

“The last day, we had a regatta down the Black River. They had so much of a connection to what they built.”

But Harrison comes by his love of building Canada’s traditional watercraft honesty. His father Ron Harrison was a machine-shop teacher at Park Street Collegiate Institute from 1962 to 1995 and started the school’s Outward Bound program in the late 1960s.

“I was always around it; the essence, respect and joy of being in nature,” Harrison said, noting his father also helped students learn to build canoes.

“My father has built 86 canoes in cedar strip or fibreglass. I’ve built six, so I have a long way to go.”

Harrison has also been busy writing a collection of essays for an upcoming book entitled The Last Algonquin, which is a guide on how to build a traditional Canadian canoe that also features insights into life, Indigenous history and one’s place in nature.

“What technology utilizes birch bark’s water repellent nature, sewn in a blanket with spruce roots, structured internally with split cedar ribs, and sealed with spruce gum housing?” one essay excerpt asks before pointing out the canoe was created by combining three existing First Nations’ technologies found in other traditional items like snowshoes and toboggans “for travelling over frozen water.”

Harrison said he loves living in his tipi and being one with nature.

“I get so much peace and quiet for weeks at a time up at my site,” he said.

“I’m taught by nature and you renew your senses of sight, smell and sound. I get a better balance then when I was just living in the city.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Stay up to date

Subscribe for email updates

Trending