I He(art) Harrison Hot Springs and Calgary...and wherever you're reading this - CBC.ca - Canadanewsmedia
Connect with us

Arts

I He(art) Harrison Hot Springs and Calgary…and wherever you're reading this – CBC.ca

Published

on


Hello! You’re reading the CBC Arts newsletter, and if you like what you see, stick around! Sign up here, and every Sunday we’ll send you a fresh email packed with art, culture and a metric truckload of eye candy, hand-picked by our small and mighty team. Here’s what we’ve been talking about this week.

It’s the series you know and (hopefully) love from last year: I He(art) My City! And on Friday, we started our informational road trip in Calgary with curator Maeve Hanna

The team’s commissioned a bunch of artists from across Canada to write travel guides to their hometowns, so you can look forward to that in the coming weeks.

But because summer isn’t long enough to explore every art scene from here to Tuktoyaktuk, as promised, I’m turning the newsletter into a sort of companion project for the next few weeks.

I’ve asked for your local tips — and now, it’s (finally!) time to start sharing them.

It’s not too late to contribute, pals. Email whenever!

But first, let’s turn things over to reader Earla D. in…

Harrison Hot Springs, B.C.

Welcome to the Spirit Trail. (Courtesy of Earla D.)

What’s the most magical spot in your hometown?

“The most magical spot in my hometown is a place called Spirit Trail. That’s what the locals who live in the village of Harrison Hot Springs call this walk through the forest. With dozens of clay masks hung amongst the tall cedar and hemlock trees, its gentle path leads you to spots to sit, whether to sketch or contemplate the quiet.”

What’s the best place to see art where you live?

“The best place to see art where I live is the Ranger Station Art Gallery, run by a small band of volunteers here in Harrison Hot Springs. Each month, artists are highlighted from all over. They also share the space with local artists and host the members’ miniature art shows, their artist-in-residence show and [an annual show by] school children. And when you sit in its space overlooking the lake, you wonder if there is another art gallery with such a great backyard.”

[Ed note: Just the other week, I interviewed the Kent Harrison Arts Council’s artist in residence, Aileen Penner, about what it’s like living and working there!]

Who’s your favourite local artist?

Jayne Patrick. Her work is bold [and] mindful, and it’s almost like she collaborates with nature to express its beauty and wonder. I was blown away when I learned she’s employed full time elsewhere because her art is so intentional. The bottom line with Jayne’s work: I appreciate seeing my world through her eyes and hand.”

And because we promised you eye candy

(Instagram/@eliseconlin)

Paintings and illustrations by Elise Conlin. (Who tracked down her booth at the Toronto Outdoor Art Fair? The event took over Nathan Phillips Square this past weekend.)

(Instagram/@lehohneh)

Paintings by Leone McComas, (Same question as above! She’s another local who was showing paintings at the fair.)

(Instagram/@yovska)

My favourite monster/Toronto drag queen/star of Canada’s a Drag just landed a spot on the reality series Dragula, and because I will take any excuse to share stuff from Yovska‘s Instagram, here you go. Sweet dreams.

(Instagram/@zac_eastwood_bloom)

Greek gods…glitched! Sculptures by Zachary Eastwood-Bloom.

(Instagram/@ianberry.art)

Before you throw out that old pair of jeans…(Denim art by Ian Berry. Denim!!!)

You’ve got to see this

I He(art) Calgary – Here it is: that aforementioned city guide. Curator and art critic Maeve Hanna will show you her Calgary, and it’s a tour that could keep anyone entertained for weeks, if not months — especially if you have a passion for art, ice cream and karaoke. (I think Maeve might be my new best friend.)

Let these artists mess with your face – Later this summer, anyone will be able to create their own custom face filters for Instagram, but there are a few Canadians who are already pushing the app’s potential. We checked in with three of those artists — folks who have completely different visions of our puppy-faced future. You’re going to want to try all their effects.

Fakes! Frauds! Flim flam! – A massive haul of ancient art forgeries was discovered in Saskatchewan. Would you believe it?! Uh…you really shouldn’t. But you might want to explore The Secret Library of Mr. Prud’homme, anyway. It’s an art show that doubles as a fictional museum collection — one created by dozens of writers and authors from all over the country. We spoke with the curators, who revealed how they pulled it all off.

Follow this artist

(Instagram/@kirstendo)

Kirsten Hatfield (@kirstendo) – If that colour scheme makes you think of Kid Pix and Angelfire, then you might just be a ’90s kid. You might just love Kirsten Hatfield, too. We met up with the artist in Vancouver.


Got questions? Typo catches? Story ideas?

We’re just an email away. Send us a note, and we’ll do our best to get back to you.

And if someone forwarded you this message and you like what you’ve read, here’s where to subscribe for more.

And I know, I know — your hometown definitely deserves a shoutout in this newsletter.

So, good news!

I still want tips for “I He(art) My City!”

Maybe you’ll be featured in the newsletter this time next week. But you have to email first!

  • What’s the most magical spot in your hometown?

  • What’s the best place to see art where you live?

  • Who’s your favourite local artist?

You know how to get in touch.

Until next week! XOXO, CBC Arts

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Arts

PHOTOS: Huge crowd flocks to annual Mission Arts Council Christmas Craft Market – Mission City Record

Published

on

By


Heritage Park School was a hub of activity this weekend for the annual Mission Arts Council Christmas Craft Market.

Patrons stood shoulder to shoulder viewing everything from chocolates to knitted garments to metalwork and acrylic paintings offered by the more than 100 vendors.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Arts

Non-profit Tides Contemporary Art Gallery opens in Kentville – The Guardian

Published

on

By



KENTVILLE, N.S. —

The Annapolis Valley’s newest art gallery is now open in Kentville. 

Tides Contemporary Art Gallery is non-profit gallery that features the work of more than a dozen established and emerging artists from Kings County and southwestern Nova Scotia.

It’s a project of the Kentville Art Gallery Society, and is the space formerly occupied by the Hardware Gallery, across the street from the Kings County Museum.

The new gallery is a co-op, with staffing provided mainly by the artists themselves and some volunteers. Operating costs are covered by membership fees, so the gallery already has its first year of expenses and marketing costs in the bank.

Gallery co-ordinator and society chair Bob Hainstock said the co-op model makes the most sense for a new gallery. 

“Private ownership starting a new gallery with private money, it’s just not happening anymore,” he said. 

The featured artists sit the gallery from one to three days a month, which means there are no staffing costs so money can be spent on marketing.

“To establish a gallery again in Kentville is going to take a lot of marketing.”

He said the gallery has a good mix. 

Bob Hainstock poses for a photo at the new Tides Contemporary Art Gallery in Kentville. Hainstock, the gallery co-ordinator, says co-ops are a good model when opening new galleries. – Ian Fairclough

A varied palette of artists

There are established artists with international reputations and exposure in top New York and Toronto galleries, as well as several some just beginning their exhibition experience. Artists will change their exhibition work every month.

Among those showing are Maggie Schmidt Mandell, Roy Mandell, Carolyn Mallory, Wayne Boucher and Gundrun Mueller-Both.

“We’ve  concentrated mainly on painters and print makers: the wall artists,” Hainstock said. “Now we have to make an effort to get the floor artists, the sculptors, the metal, fibre and wood people.”

There is a waiting list of about a dozen artists hoping to get into the gallery, and Hainstock said he would love to see more artist co-ops get established, and said the model has proven successful elsewhere.

The town owns the building and wants to sell, so Hainstock said it’s critical that the gallery achieve success during its two-year lease.

He said the society would also like to develop the second floor of the building and put in a print-makers co-op, potters co-op and an educational co-op that would put on classes and workshops in a huge array of arts and crafts mediums.

“We want to make this whole area very active, with a lot of traffic coming into Kentville to either look or take part in the arts and culture activities,” he said. 

“Arts and culture enterprises are providing a new energy and confidence in small towns, that you don’t have to bring in the big manufacturing plants or count on government jobs anymore.”

He said more and more people who are retiring, or nearing retirement age, are taking up interests in the arts “and finding out that they’re damn good at it. They’re getting a satisfaction of ‘hey, who knew I was an artist?’”

That also helps fuel galleries, he said. 

The gallery will also feature an art gift boutique and art rental program. The gift boutique will feature smaller, less expensive pieces. The art rental program is designed for home or office and includes rent-to-own features, as well as opportunities for business rewards to company employees or customers.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Arts

Non-profit Tides Contemporary Art Gallery opens in Kentville – TheChronicleHerald.ca

Published

on

By


The Annapolis Valley’s newest art gallery is now open in Kentville. 

Tides Contemporary Art Gallery is non-profit gallery that features the work of more than a dozen established and emerging artists from Kings County and southwestern Nova Scotia.

It’s a project of the Kentville Art Gallery Society, and is the space formerly occupied by the Hardware Gallery, across the street from the Kings County Museum.

The new gallery is a co-op, with staffing provided mainly by the artists themselves and some volunteers. Operating costs are covered by membership fees, so the gallery already has its first year of expenses and marketing costs in the bank.

Gallery coordinator and society chair Bob Hainstock said the co-op model makes the most sense for a new gallery. 

“Private ownership starting a new gallery with private money, it’s just not happening anymore,” he said. 

The featured artists sit the gallery from one to three days a month, which means there are no staffing costs so money can be spent on marketing.

“To establish a gallery again in Kentville is going to take a lot of marketing.”

He said the gallery has a good mix. 

There are established artists with international reputations and exposure in top New York and Toronto galleries, as well as several some just beginning their exhibition experience. Artists will change their exhibition work every month.

Among those showing are Maggie Schmidt Mandell, Roy Mandell, Carolyn Mallory, Wayne Boucher and Gundrun Mueller-Both.

“We’ve  concentrated mainly on painters and print makers: the wall artists,” Hainstock said. “Now we have to make an effort to get the floor artists, the sculptors, the metal, fibre and wood people.”

There is a waiting list of about a dozen artists hoping to get into the gallery, and Hainstock said he would love to see more artist co-ops get established, and said the model has proven successful elsewhere.

The town owns the building and wants to sell, so Hainstock said it’s critical that the gallery achieve success during its two-year lease.

He said the society would also like to develop the second floor of the building and put in a print-makers co-op, potters co-op and an educational co-op that would put on classes and workshops in a huge array of arts and crafts mediums.

“We want to make this whole area very active, with a lot of traffic coming into Kentville to either look or take part in the arts and culture activities,” he said. 
“Arts and culture enterprises are providing a new energy and confidence in small towns, that you don’t have to bring in the big manufacturing plants or count on government jobs anymore.”

He said more and more people who are retiring, or nearing retirement age, are taking up interests in the arts “and finding out that they’re damn good at it. They’re getting a satisfaction of ‘hey, who knew I was an artist?’”

That also helps fuel galleries, he said. 

The gallery will also feature an art gift boutique and art rental program. The gift boutique will feature smaller, less expensive pieces. The art rental program is designed for home or office and includes rent-to-own features, as well as opportunities for business rewards to company employees or customers.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending