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Manitoba Museum marks Apollo 11 moon landing with space party – Calgary Herald

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Scott Young (left), manager of the Planetarium and Science Gallery at the Manitoba Museum in Winnipeg, stands in front of a model of the moon and next to a cut-out of Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques in the Science Gallery on Saturday. The Manitoba Museum is marking the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing with a series of events.


GLEN DAWKINS / Winnipeg Sun/Postmedia Network

When Scott Young tries to explain the Apollo missions to the moon to a new generation of curious children, he says he first has make to make them understand concepts like the Cold War and a Space Race with a country and global adversary that hasn’t been around in their lifetimes.

“When we talk about this, we have to explain to a lot of the kids what the Soviet Union was,” said Young, the manager of the Planetarium and Science Gallery at the Manitoba Museum in Winnipeg which is marking the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing with a series of educational events. “The whole context for the moon landing – the Cold War and the Space Race – is lost on a lot of people today because the world has changed so much.

“They ask, ‘Why aren’t we still going to the moon?’. Well, it’s because we’re not in a Cold War race with another nuclear superpower. It’s just too expensive to do it so there’s no impetus to go through with it.”

To mark 50th anniversary of the first moon landing, the Planetarium and Science Gallery hosted an ‘out of this world space party’ on Saturday evening with After Hours: Apollo 50 with hands-on Apollo space displays in the Science Gallery, special guests, a lunar module selfie station, and dance music from the ’60s and ’70’s.

“What people do relate to is the idea of exploration and going to a new world,” said the 48-year-old Young, who was not born when Neil Armstrong took his few small steps on the moon on July 20, 1969 but was a curious 18-month-old toddler watching Apollo 17 make the last moon landing in 1972. “Even if you didn’t grow up at that time, everyone knows, ‘One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.’ It’s something that is pervasive.”

Saturday’s space party kicks off a series of events, running until September.

Young hopes that the 50th anniversary will spark renewed interest among young people in science, technology and engineering much like the kids who grew up watching Apollo were inspired by how those things could solve seemingly impossible problems.

“Ultimately, we’re going to have to move beyond Earth,” said Young. “It’s what humans do. We’ve always gone over the horizon to the next thing. Sometimes it’s driven by profit and greed, sometimes it’s driven by there’s too many people in this space that we have to move out. But it’s something that we’ve always done.”

gdawkins@postmedia.com

Twitter: @SunGlenDawkins

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Mercury Transit Live Stream – Den of Geek US

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Your Monday is about to get a lot better, especially if you’re on the East Coast. At 7:35 am ET, you’ll get the clearest view of a rare celestial event, as Mercury transits the Sun from our vantage point for the first time since 2016. This is an event we’re only able to witness from Earth about 13 times per century. In fact, the next time you’ll able to watch Mercury cross in front of the Sun is in 2032, which means you probably won’t want to miss it this time around. 

It’ll take Mercury five and a half hours to complete its transit, so you’ll have until 1:04 pm ET to catch the event. Of course, that doesn’t mean you should stare directly at the Sun — protective eyewear is recommended. Check out NASA’s eye safety tips for viewing transits and eclipses. 

For those of you who won’t get a chance to see the event in person, you can watch Mercury’s transit across the Sun in the live stream below:

Video of Mercury Transit 2019 LIVE Stream

Mercury actually completes a full orbit around the Sun every 88 days, but it’s not often that it does so from an Earth-friendly vantage point due to its “eccentric, egg-shaped orbit,” according to NASA. Due to this unusual orbit, the fastest planet in our Solar System, traveling through space at 29 miles per second, can get as close as 29 million miles and as far as 43 million miles from the Sun. For comparison, Earth is about 93 million miles from the star.

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As you’d expect, the first planet in our Solar System can get MUCH hotter than Earth, reaching temperatures higher than 800 degrees Fahrenheit or as cold as minus 290 degrees Fahrenheit since Mercury has no atmosphere with which to retain heat. Basically, don’t expect to find any signs of life on this celestial hellscape.

I leave you with my favorite scene from my favorite science fiction movie, Danny Boyle‘s Sunshine. Chris Evans (before he was Captain America), Cillian Murphy, Rose Byrne, Michelle Yeoh, Cliff Curtis, Hiroyuki Sanada, and the rest of the movie’s killer ensemble cast gather in their spaceship’s observation deck to watch Mercury transit the Sun on their way to reignite the star and save Earth from a chilly death:

Video of "Sunshine" Movie Clip – Approaching Mercury

John Saavedra is an associate editor at Den of Geek. Read more of his work here. Follow him on Twitter @johnsjr9.

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Planet dances with sun | Local News – The Chronicle Journal

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Allan Haney braved cold temperatures at Hillcrest Park on Monday for a front row view of the planet Mercury passing the sun in a rare celestial transit.

He used a pair of binoculars to reflect the sun on a white paper plate to see the tiny black dot that is Mercury as it passed directly between Earth and the sun during the five-and-a-half-hour celestial show that was visible in Canada, the eastern U.S., Central and South America.

The rest of the world, with the exception of Asia and Australia, got just a sampling.

In our solar system, Mercury is the smallest and innermost planet. The next transit will take place in 2032, but North America won’t get another glimpse until 2049.

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Mercury passes across sun’s face in rare 5-hour transit – Global News

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Mini Mercury skipped across the vast, glaring face of the sun Monday in a rare celestial transit.

Stargazers used solar-filtered binoculars and telescopes to spot Mercury — a tiny black dot — as it passed directly between Earth and the sun on Monday.

Planet Mercury is seen as a small silhouette, center left, as it travels across the face of the sun, near capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019.

Planet Mercury is seen as a small silhouette, center left, as it travels across the face of the sun, near capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019.


(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

The eastern U.S. and Canada got the whole 5 1/2-hour show, weather permitting, along with Central and South America. The rest of the world, except for Asia and Australia, got just a sampling.

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How to watch Mercury’s transit across the sun on Monday

Mercury is the solar system’s smallest, innermost planet. The next transit isn’t until 2032, and North America won’t get another shot until 2049.

This still image from video issued by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows Mercury as it passes between Earth and the sun on Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. The solar system’s smallest, innermost planet resembles a tiny black dot during the transit, which began at 7:35 a.m. EST (1205 UTC).

This still image from video issued by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows Mercury as it passes between Earth and the sun on Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. The solar system’s smallest, innermost planet resembles a tiny black dot during the transit, which began at 7:35 a.m. EST (1205 UTC).


(NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory via AP)

In Maryland, clouds prevented NASA solar astrophysicist Alex Young from getting a clear peek. Live coverage was provided by observatories including NASA’s orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory.






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Searching for Mercury


Searching for Mercury

“It’s a bummer, but the whole event was still great,” Young wrote in an email. “Both getting to see it from space and sharing it with people all over the country and world.”

At Cape Canaveral, space buffs got a two-for-one. As Mercury’s silhouette graced the morning sun, SpaceX launched 60 small satellites for global internet service, part of the company’s growing Starlink constellation in orbit.

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© 2019 The Canadian Press

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