5 Autumn Destinations For Art Lovers - Forbes - Canadanewsmedia
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5 Autumn Destinations For Art Lovers – Forbes

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The fall shoulder season is a perfect time for leisure travel for those able to snag a long weekend away. Kids are back in school; hotel rates and airfares plummet after the peak summer season; and the weather tends to be milder and more conducive to travel of any kind. It’s also when many destinations come alive, covered with nature’s amazing palette of fall foliage.

A number of upcoming festivals and exhibitions offer the perfect excuse for art lovers to plan an autumn getaway. Here are a handful to consider:

1- MOJA Arts Festival in Charleston, South Carolina

Now in its 36th year, the MOJA Festival is a unique celebration of African-American and Caribbean arts. Held in multiple venues through the city, this year’s events are scheduled to take place between September 26th and October 6th, 2019 The diverse arts lineup features dance, music and visual arts experiences, many borne from the region’s Gullah traditions. Selected as one of the Southeast Tourism Society’s top 20 events, the name of this lively celebration of unity in Charleston derives from the Swahili word moja meaning “one.”

2- Heritage Weekend in Asheville, North Carolina

The annual Heritage Weekend, taking place September 21-22, 2019 at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Asheville, showcases Appalachian native art, including traditional music, dance and heritage crafts. Sponsored by the Southern Highland Craft Guild, the festival also offers participants the chance to learn about beekeeping, coopering, heritage toy making, natural dyeing, spinning, broom making and furniture making from local experts. Round out the weekend by checking out the River Arts District (RAD) that has blossomed into a home for the studios and galleries of hundreds of art visionaries.

3- Sonnabend Exhibit at Remai Modern Museum in Saskatoon, Canada

National Geographic noted that the city of Saskatoon, Canada (in the province of Saskatchewan) has been called the “Paris of the prairies” for its vibrant culture and lively spirit. Residents of the U.S. Northwest (or Canada), who want to get off the beaten path, can make a beeline to the Remai Modern, a new museum of modern and contemporary art. From October 5, 2019 to March 22nd, 2020, the museum will host influential art dealer Ileana Sonnabend’s most comprehensive exhibit in North America with 100 works by 68 artists. If you’re in town on Sunday, September 29, you’ll enjoy participating in the city’s 5th annual Nuit Blanche Saskatoon Festival, showcasing multiple forms of visual art and storytelling, including works that involve light.

4- Renoir Exhibit at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas

From October 27, 2019 to January 26, 2020, the Kimbell Art Museum will host Renoir: The Body, The Senses, the first major exhibition of the artist’s work focusing on the human form. It will include approximately 60 paintings, drawings, pastels and sculptures by Renoir as well as works by his predecessors, contemporaries and followers. While in Fort Worth: The Cultural District is home to five major museums, world-famous for their architecture and the quality of their collections.

5- Capital Arts Fest at Concord, New Hampshire

Fall foliage in New Hampshire typically offers a vibrant show of colors from late September to mid-October. A trip through the state is worthwhile for leaf-peeping alone. But on the weekend of September 27-29th, 2019, visitors to Concord (the state capital) will have the opportunity to enjoy exhibitions, performances and art on the street combined with great food and local beer. That’s when the League of NH Craftsmen brings together artists and craftsmen from all over the state to celebrate creativity at the Capital Arts Fest

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Penticton’s Arts Rising Festival included as BC Culture Days 10th anniversary celebration – Pentiction Western News

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Penticton’s Arts Rising Festival will be part of the upcoming BC Culture Days’ 10th anniversary celebration.

Organized by the Penticton and District Community Arts Council, the event will take place at various locations across the city on Sept. 27, running from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Other Okanagan city’s will also be hosting their own Culture Days events in honour of the beloved province-wide arts and culture celebration.

“This vibrant weekend of artistic expression will explore the intersections of creativity, the arts and well-being. Featuring painting, theatre, experimental performance art, literature, design, cinema, and beyond, BC Culture Days is a thrilling family-friendly weekend that builds community, fosters well-being, encourages exploration and discovery and celebrates creativity in all its forms,” states a release.

READ MORE: Arts Rising festival painting a more intimate feel

BC Culture Days will officially launch with a provincial kick-off event in Mission on Sept. 22, 2019 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Heritage Park Centre. Mission: A Mosaic of Cultures will showcase a broad range of cultural activities by notable and emerging artists from the Mission community. In addition, the release states the cultural hub for the Okanagan and surrounding regions is A SIGNATURE IN TIME — Kelowna Arts and Culture Festival 2019 and is located at the Rotary Centre for the Arts.

Beginning at 10 a.m. on Sept. 27, Penticton residents can learn how to make paper slurry from natural materials with Harmony Paper at the Leir House, located at 220 Manor Park Ave. Song Catching with Yanti kicks off at the same location from 3 to 4 p.m.

The audience can have their say and help artist Lyse Desellier create a new painting at the Tumbleweed Gallery, located at 452 Main St., from 4 to 6 p.m. Then it’s back to Leir House for the Magic & Mystery opening night and reception, which will include a thank you party to Sharon Lawrence, who recently retired after 13 years with the council. This will take place from 6 to 8 p.m.

All events part of the BC Culture Days celebration in Penticton are free and ope to the public. For more information, or to see what other cities are doing to celebrate, visit www.culturedays.ca.

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.

Jordyn Thomson | Reporter
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Disaster in store for Prince Rupert, announces Lester Centre of the Arts – Prince Rupert Northern View

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Disaster will be coming to Prince Rupert in April, but don’t worry, not in the literal sense.

The Lestre Centre of the Arts’ announced that Disaster! was chosen as the 2020 community musical.

Disaster!, is a musical comedy created by three-time Emmy Award nominee and SiriusXM Broadway host Seth Rudetsky.

“We chose this production to appeal not only to audiences but artists as well. We’ll be searching for performers and instrumentalists with a wide range of specialties and talents. The lighthearted script and the infectious rhythms of the score guarantee this will be fun for everyone,” stated Kristy Tillman, who will lead the musical production.

READ MORE: Council briefs: Gurney marks one year as Lester Centre’s manager, marina revenues down

The score features favourites from the 1970’s like ‘Knock on Wood’ and ‘Hooked on a Feeling’ with a “storyline set in a floating casino and discotheque”.

Tillman led the orchestra for the Lester Centre’s 2018 production of Spamalot and 9 to 5: The Musical, put on by Charles Hays Secondary School. Joining her on the Disaster! team is Hans Seidemann who will serve as the show’s artistic director. He most recently directed Neil Simon’s Rumors for the Lester Centre’s spring production.

READ AND WATCH MORE: “Spamalot” crowned a hit

“The comedic chops of Prince Rupert’s artistic community will get a thorough workout,” Seidemann stated. “The bell-bottomed A-listers who are outrageously lampooned in this story are going to infect our city with disco fever, whose side effects include dancing in the aisles.”

Dwain Harrison will oversee the show’s design and Scott Langille will serve as stage manager.

Auditions will be held at the end of October with the musical taking place in April.

READ MORE: Memorable quotes, moments, from Prince Rupert’s first TEDx


Jenna Cocullo | Journalist
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Aboriginal arts organization forced to cancel conference plans due to Ontario funding cuts – Global News

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After the Ontario government eliminated the Indigenous Culture Fund earlier in 2019, some Indigenous organizations have been left without funding.

The Aboriginal Arts Collective of Canada (AACC) previously received $25,000 from the Indigenous Culture Fund through the Ontario Arts Council (OAC). The funding was administered on behalf of the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport.

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Dawn Setford, the founder and president of the AACC, said now that the Indigenous Culture Fund has been eliminated, the organization does not have enough funding to continue some of its efforts to preserve Indigenous arts and tradition.


READ MORE:
Ontario government eliminates Indigenous Culture Fund, cuts millions for the arts

Setford said she used the money to hold a conference earlier in March to teach Indigenous women about the spirituality behind the techniques of Indigenous arts and tradition. She said they brought in elders and artists who taught the participants about drum-making, ancient basketry, porcupine quilling, and caribou tufting — important ancient Indigenous art forms lost as time passed.

Without the funding, Setford said she’s unable to hold another a similar conference in 2020.

“I won’t be holding another one next year because I don’t have that funding,” said Setford.


READ MORE:
Ford government cuts funding to Ontario Arts Council, impacting Indigenous Culture Fund

“I can’t foresee having another conference without the support of the Indigenous Culture Fund and other funds that are similar,” she said.

Additionally, Setford said there is a difference between how Indigenous individuals perceive art and how non-Indigenous people do.

“Our art is completely based on spirituality and culture. In everything we make, there’s symbolism to a story, reference to a map or a pattern,” she said.

Dawn Setford (pictured in black) at the Indigenous Art Conference in Ottawa in March at the ribbon skirt workshop.

Shrestharth Ghosh / Fuzd

The Ford government cut arts sector support to $6.5 million from $18.5 million in May. The Ontario Arts Council was set to receive $10 million less in funding in 2019, which resulted in the elimination of the Indigenous Culture Fund.

However, Setford said the Indigenous Culture Fund did more than just support the arts.

“The Indigenous Culture Fund did not just support our artistic endeavors, so when somebody sees that that programming or funding was cancelled, it’s not just that we can’t paint anymore,” she said.

“That funding was actually very sensitively directed towards reclamation of our language; mentorship that helped us to relearn and then teach our children.”

Setford said the funding was meant to help them revitalize their languages, songs, performance art and traditional art, adding the fund also helped Indigenous women to gain momentum and relearn their traditions.

“We came together, a group of a couple hundred women, and we gathered in order to make sure that the original purposes of our arts weren’t forgotten,” she said.


READ MORE:
Doug Ford to move ahead with Ontario municipal funding cuts in 2020

“That’s why this really hurts. Because generally speaking, we as Indigenous women were just getting momentum. We were just coming back to pride and not being afraid.”

A spokesperson for the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport recently provided Global News with a statement regarding the cuts.

“The government believes that all artists, including Indigenous artists, play an important role in sharing cultural practices and strengthening communities’ well-being,” the statement read.

With respect to the elimination of the Indigenous Culture Fund, the spokesperson said it still supports Indigenous art in other ways.

“A $60-million investment in the Ontario Arts Council is seeing the continuation of numerous core programs that support Indigenous artists, musicians, and other individuals,” the statement continued.


READ MORE:
A list of cuts and changes Doug Ford has made this year as he tries to balance the budget

The programs cited by the government include Indigenous Arts Projects and Indigenous Presenters in the North: Music Projects.

Meanwhile, Setford said without the Indigenous Culture Fund the organization doesn’t have any other options in terms of funding.

She said the AACC is a Canada-incorporated not-for-profit organization that can’t afford to move forward and become a charity. Setford said corporations are more likely to give money to charities so they can claim it as a charity donation.

“Our funding is really limited to government sponsored councils, such as the OAC,” she said.

“Without the ICF, the Canada Council for the Arts is inundated with proposals and funding is spread thin – leaving gatherings like ours without any funding.”

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