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In the newsletter: I don't want summer to be over, but… – CBC.ca

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Work by some of the 2019 Toronto Nuit Blanche artists: Jordan Bennett, Director X, Esmaa Mohamoud and Daniel Arsham. Also, a picture of a ball pit. (CBC News/Courtesy of Brookfield Place New York/Courtesy of the artists)

Hello! You’re reading the CBC Arts newsletter, and if you like what you see, stick around! Sign up here, and every Sunday we’ll send you a fresh email packed with art, culture and a metric truckload of eye candy, hand-picked by our small and mighty team. Here’s what we’ve been talking about this week.

Hi, art lovers!

Look, I definitely do not want the summer to be over. There are too many summer movies left to watch! Too many summer outfits I want to wear! (And too many outfits inspired by this particular summer horror movie.) But damn if this week’s Nuit Blanche announcement isn’t already making me desperate for October to get here already.

The all-night event returns to Toronto Oct. 5, and it’ll include a few new far-flung neighbourhoods this time around (e.g. an exhibition zone in East Danforth). And there are so, so many artists involved who’ve been featured on CBC Arts, which is maybe why I’m already overwhelmed by the schedule. They’ve got Hatecopy, Layne Hinton and Rui Pimenta, Camille Jodoin-Eng, Director X, Jordan Bennett (who’ll bring Tepkik, which is currently up in New York City), Kent Monkman, Esmaa Mohamoud and Bryan Espiritu. (Esmaa and Bryan are creating a tribute to the Raptors, by the way. Go, sparts!)

Get the full program here. Plus, here’s a short video about one of the event’s tentpole attractions, Lunar Garden. It’s an eerily peaceful installation by Daniel Arsham (read: supersized pink Zen garden on the moon), and it’ll be taking over Nathan Phillips Square to Oct. 14. And because Nuit Blanche always has a certain urban playground vibe, here’s an intriguing long-ish read about the man who invented the ball pit. (There’s a Canadian connection, too. Somebody get this guy a Heritage Minute.)

And because we promised you eye candy

(Instagram/@riskrock)

Enough thinking about October, there are things happening RIGHT NOW — things like the Up Here festival in Sudbury, Ont. This year, they’ve recruited international street artist Risk to paint them the biggest mural in Canada. That’s not it in the picture, obvs. (This relatively diminutive wall’s in Miami.) Follow his progress on the festival’s IG.

(supremo.co.uk)

Do you have a designer’s eye? (I passed, but I’m not about to quit this gig, either.)

(Galerie Cité at La Cité Francophone)

Like aura photos but with pencil crayons. Portraits by Calgary artist Kelly Isaak. (See them in person at Edmonton’s Galerie Cité at La Cité Francophone to Sept. 21.)

(Vimeo/Mike Pelletier)

In case you’ve been wondering what our old Exhibitionist in Residence Mike Pelletier’s been up to

You’ve got to see this

She canoed to Thunder Bay in a big Victorian dress — and the trip’s not over yet – This time last summer, Naomi Harris was scared for her life — over and over and over again. The artist made a 70-day canoe journey, “paddling in the footsteps” of 19th-century painter Frances Anne Hopkins, and while the trip could’ve killed her, she’s retracing her steps later this month. (Live and learn. She’s taking a car this time.) Read about the whole adventure.

Under the bridge – She’s the Canadian choreographer behind your favourite Feist and Carly Rae Jepsen videos (or mine, at least), and earlier this summer, Noémie Lafrance gave Toronto a treat. We head to The Bentway, a unique stretch of park space under the city’s crumbling Gardiner Expressway. That’s where Lafrance debuted Dérives, an outdoor production featuring 50 dancers. Watch highlights from the show and go behind the scenes of its creation.

Fall in love with Saint John – The New Brunswick city is an unusually decent place to see public art. (You’ve scrolled past the new Hula mural on Instagram by now, I trust?) Filmmaker Matthew Brown (a guy who’s contributed a ton of short docs to CBC Arts) knows where to find the best stuff — and there are loads of the usual touristy tips (Food! Sights! More food!) in his guide to the city, too.

Follow this artist 

(Instagram/@kc.wilcox)

KC Wilcox (@kc.wilcox) – Speaking of Saint John, that’s where KC lives! And we hung out with her at the city’s Tin Can Beach. That’s where she finds the odds and ends (read: litter) that become works of art like this. KC’s big on sculpting discarded objects with rubber latex, which she will explain to you in detail at this handy video link.


Got questions? Typo catches? Story ideas?

We’re just an email away. Send us a note, and we’ll do our best to get back to you.

And if someone forwarded you this message and you like what you’ve read, here’s where to subscribe for more.
 

Until next week!

XOXO, CBC Arts

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Ice sheets, pool, arts centre identified in Kamloops draft master rec plan – Kamloops This Week

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The City of Kamloops should consider building a performing-arts centre, a new pool facility and a trio of ice rinks in the future.

On Tuesday, city council was given an update on its new recreation master plan being drafted by consultant RC Strategies.

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A non-profit society is working with arts groups and the community to advance the arts centre project, with tasks identified: developing a new business case, communications strategy, enlisting community support through a membership drive, providing input into design of the project and fundraising.

Consultant Stephen Slawuta of RC Strategies said the city should continue to explore the viability of an arts centre.

“See where it leads and move forward based on the directive of that business case initiative,” he said.

An arts centre was identified as a top priority following community input in the draft plan, Slawuta said.

He added that visits to city pools has been increasing over the past four years.

While RC found the city does a good job providing most aquatic services, leisure aquatic activities was identified as a gap area.

The master plan suggests exploring adding another indoor aquatics facility with leisure activities as the focus and taking a deeper dive into details of such a development such as whether the pool should be a standalone or multi-use facility, costs, impacts on other city pools and a location in an area of the city where this type of service is lacking.

When it comes to ice rinks in Kamloops, Slawuta said RC’s investigation into usage suggests their are some challenges.

“In this case, your facilities are at or over capacity and that would suggest there is a need to increase the provision of ice,” he said, noting the city will need to invest in upgrading its existing ice rinks over time.

Slawuta said RC’s analysis shows bringing the city’s prime time ice usage — evening and weekend hours between September and March — down to 85 per cent from the current 100 per cent would require at least three more sheets.

“And 85 per cent prime time utilization is still a very high level of utilization, but we think that is a reasonable target,” he said.

The master plan suggests adding one or two new ice rinks in the next three to seven years, and another one or two sheets in seven to 12 years.

In the medium term, the plan suggests exploring adding more indoor dry floor field space when considering building any arenas or aquatics facilities, Slawuta said.

In the short term, the plan recommends continued engagement with the school district to ensure community access to those facilities.

Slawuta said the city should continue to monitor usage at spirts fields and ball diamonds and focus on quality over quantity of those spaces.

On a case-by-case basis, the city should explore its opportunities to make improvements and enhancements to those facilities such as adding washroom, seating and improving playing surfaces.

As for the city’s two curling rinks, Slawuta suggested the city continue to support those operations as long as they are viable.

“At some point, it’s likely something is going to call viability into question,” Slawuta said, noting possibilities such as a drop in participation or a major repair of one of the city’s curling facilities.

If and when this happens, Slawuta said, it would be prudent to discuss consolidating the clubs and retrofit one of the two facilities for a different, dry floor surface sport.

The master plan recommends the city more closely monitor its court spaces to determine if sports like tennis and pickle ball are in high demand and require further study, Slawuta said.

Indoor play spaces were also looked at, Slawuta said, noting those spaces should be considered when exploring future development and multi-use facilities.

The city should consider ensuring its existing recreational infrastructure is sustained before contemplating new development, Slawuta said.

Multi-use spaces should be prioritized along with inclusion and access, he said.

Feedback collected on the draft plan will be incorporated into the plan and brought before council for adoption at a later date.

The public will have a chance to give its input on Oct. 2 at 7 p.m. at Sports Central Lounge in the McArthur Island Sport and Event Centre and on Oct. 3 at Heritage House in Riverside Park, at 100 Lorne St.

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Hibernation Arts hosting poetry reading on Thursday night – OrilliaMatters.Com

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NEWS RELEASES
HIBERNATION ARTS
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Hibernation Arts, a local gallery in the Arts District, is proud to announce the resumption of its Wordsmith Series, with a poetry reading by Dave Armishaw and Josh Poitras on Thursday, Sept. 19 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

These two local poets have markedly different styles which actually complement each other. The Wordsmith Series started last winter, but took a hiatus over the summer.

This series will resume one evening a month until winter sets in, at which time the readings will be presented one Sunday afternoon a month. The $10 admission includes light refreshments, and the poets will have some of their work for sale.

This is a good opportunity to listen to poetry in an intimate environment enjoyed by both listeners and poets.

Hibernation Arts is also proud to announce the first of its house concerts with Sean Patrick and Darrin Davis, to take place on Thursday, Sept. 26 from 7 to 9 p.m.

The music will be unplugged or minimally amplified, so it is a good opportunity to listen to music in an intimate environment enjoyed by both listeners and musicians.

These concerts will be presented once or twice a month. The $20 admission includes light refreshments. Hibernation Arts is at 7 Peter St. S. in the Orillia Arts District.

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Love the arts in New West? Here's how you can help – The Record (New Westminster)

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Love the arts community in New Westminster? Have some time to lend a hand?

The Arts Council of New Westminster is looking for volunteers to help out with a number of upcoming events. Among them:

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RiverFest Pop Up Exhibition:

A reception attendant and bartender are needed to help out on Wednesday, Sept. 18 from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Fraser River Discovery Centre, at the opening reception for this exhibition featuring the work of nine local artists.

On Thursday, Sept. 19, gallery attendants are needed to help supervise the artwork between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., or 1 and 4 p.m.

  

Culture Forward New West:  

On Saturday, Sept. 28, an outreach ambassador is needed to work from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the fourth floor at Anvil Centre. You can share your stories and your passion for the arts.

 

Gallery attendants:

Volunteers are needed on an ongoing basis to help at The Gallery at Queen’s Park from 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturdays or Sundays. You can volunteer on either day, once every two weeks. Volunteers are needed to help ensure the gallery can stay open on weekends.

 

Email info@acnw.ca for information or to volunteer.

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