Aboriginal arts organization forced to cancel conference plans due to Ontario funding cuts - Global News - Canadanewsmedia
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Aboriginal arts organization forced to cancel conference plans due to Ontario funding cuts – Global News

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After the Ontario government eliminated the Indigenous Culture Fund earlier in 2019, some Indigenous organizations have been left without funding.

The Aboriginal Arts Collective of Canada (AACC) previously received $25,000 from the Indigenous Culture Fund through the Ontario Arts Council (OAC). The funding was administered on behalf of the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport.

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Dawn Setford, the founder and president of the AACC, said now that the Indigenous Culture Fund has been eliminated, the organization does not have enough funding to continue some of its efforts to preserve Indigenous arts and tradition.


READ MORE:
Ontario government eliminates Indigenous Culture Fund, cuts millions for the arts

Setford said she used the money to hold a conference earlier in March to teach Indigenous women about the spirituality behind the techniques of Indigenous arts and tradition. She said they brought in elders and artists who taught the participants about drum-making, ancient basketry, porcupine quilling, and caribou tufting — important ancient Indigenous art forms lost as time passed.

Without the funding, Setford said she’s unable to hold another a similar conference in 2020.

“I won’t be holding another one next year because I don’t have that funding,” said Setford.


READ MORE:
Ford government cuts funding to Ontario Arts Council, impacting Indigenous Culture Fund

“I can’t foresee having another conference without the support of the Indigenous Culture Fund and other funds that are similar,” she said.

Additionally, Setford said there is a difference between how Indigenous individuals perceive art and how non-Indigenous people do.

“Our art is completely based on spirituality and culture. In everything we make, there’s symbolism to a story, reference to a map or a pattern,” she said.

Dawn Setford (pictured in black) at the Indigenous Art Conference in Ottawa in March at the ribbon skirt workshop.

Shrestharth Ghosh / Fuzd

The Ford government cut arts sector support to $6.5 million from $18.5 million in May. The Ontario Arts Council was set to receive $10 million less in funding in 2019, which resulted in the elimination of the Indigenous Culture Fund.

However, Setford said the Indigenous Culture Fund did more than just support the arts.

“The Indigenous Culture Fund did not just support our artistic endeavors, so when somebody sees that that programming or funding was cancelled, it’s not just that we can’t paint anymore,” she said.

“That funding was actually very sensitively directed towards reclamation of our language; mentorship that helped us to relearn and then teach our children.”

Setford said the funding was meant to help them revitalize their languages, songs, performance art and traditional art, adding the fund also helped Indigenous women to gain momentum and relearn their traditions.

“We came together, a group of a couple hundred women, and we gathered in order to make sure that the original purposes of our arts weren’t forgotten,” she said.


READ MORE:
Doug Ford to move ahead with Ontario municipal funding cuts in 2020

“That’s why this really hurts. Because generally speaking, we as Indigenous women were just getting momentum. We were just coming back to pride and not being afraid.”

A spokesperson for the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport recently provided Global News with a statement regarding the cuts.

“The government believes that all artists, including Indigenous artists, play an important role in sharing cultural practices and strengthening communities’ well-being,” the statement read.

With respect to the elimination of the Indigenous Culture Fund, the spokesperson said it still supports Indigenous art in other ways.

“A $60-million investment in the Ontario Arts Council is seeing the continuation of numerous core programs that support Indigenous artists, musicians, and other individuals,” the statement continued.


READ MORE:
A list of cuts and changes Doug Ford has made this year as he tries to balance the budget

The programs cited by the government include Indigenous Arts Projects and Indigenous Presenters in the North: Music Projects.

Meanwhile, Setford said without the Indigenous Culture Fund the organization doesn’t have any other options in terms of funding.

She said the AACC is a Canada-incorporated not-for-profit organization that can’t afford to move forward and become a charity. Setford said corporations are more likely to give money to charities so they can claim it as a charity donation.

“Our funding is really limited to government sponsored councils, such as the OAC,” she said.

“Without the ICF, the Canada Council for the Arts is inundated with proposals and funding is spread thin – leaving gatherings like ours without any funding.”

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Over $857000 in grants for 24 Delta sport, arts and culture organizations – Surrey Now-Leader

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Twenty-four sport, arts and culture organizations in Delta are receiving a share of $857,850 in funding from the provincial government’s community gaming grants program.

In 2019-2020, more than 700 not-for-profit organizations throughout the province are receiving approximately $18.3 million in community gaming grant funding to support participation in visual and performing arts, literature, festivals, and Indigenous and cultural programs, according to a government press release.

“These art, culture and sport programs provide opportunities for people to build community, foster artistic expression and engage in healthy activities,” Minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture Lisa Beare said in a press release. “Our government is proud to support these organizations to deliver programs that support inclusion and benefit people of all ages and backgrounds in communities across B.C.”

The province is also providing approximately $27 million to more than 800 community-based sports organizations for programs such as soccer, swimming, hockey, biking, martial arts, skiing and Special Olympics.

“These organizations strengthen the fabric of our community and I’m proud our government is able to support them,” Ravi Kahlon, MLA for Delta North, said in a press release.

Five arts and culture organizations and 19 community sports organizations in Delta are receiving community gaming grants. They are:

• Wesburn Wranglers of Burnaby Teen and PreTeen Square Dance Club: $3,750

• Young People’s Opera Society of BC: $6,500

• Delta Community Band Society: $4,500

• Delta Community Music School Society: $9,000

• Sidekick Players Club: $15,000

• British Columbia Ball Hockey Association: $40,000

• Delta Minor Ball Hockey Association: $35,000

• Delta Sungod Swim Club: $62,000

• Delta Thistle Curling Club: $13,900

• North Delta Football Association: $17,000

• North Delta Minor Hockey Association: $95,000

• North Delta Soccer Club: $55,000

• Sungod Skating Club: $64,000

• West Coast Junior Lacrosse League: $77,000

• Boundary Bay Bluebacks Swim Club: $32,500

• Delta Deas Rowing Club: $13,500

• Delta Gymnastics Society: $90,000

• Delta Skating Club: $23,700

• Ex-Britannia Red Lions Athletic Association: $7,500

• Ladner Minor Baseball Association: $25,000

• South Delta Minor Hockey Association: $119,000

• Tunnel Town Curling Club: $18,000

• Winskill Dolphin Swim Club: $20,000

• Winskill Otters Masters Swim Club: $11,000

RELATED: More than $208,000 in grants for North Delta PACs



editor@northdeltareporter.com

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Province supports feasibility study for proposed Stratford community arts centre – The Beacon Herald

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Thanks to support from the province and the Trillium Foundation, the Stratford Arts and Culture Collective is conducting a feasibility study on a proposed arts and culture community centre.

Perth-Wellington MPP Randy Pettapiece (right) and Ontario Trillium Foundation Rena Spevack Orr (second from left) were at the Stratford Summer Music office Thursday to congratulate The Stratford Arts and Cultural Collective for receiving a nearly $31,000 seed grant to go toward a feasibility study on the organization’s proposed community arts centre. Also in the photo are Stratford Summer Music general manager Judy Matheson, and Stratford Arts and Culture collective co-chairs Ron Dodson and Chris Leberg. Galen Simmons/The Beacon Herald/Postmedia Network

The Province of Ontario and representatives from the Ontario Trillium Fund have joined more than 30 local arts organizations to await the results of an ongoing feasibility study for a proposed arts and culture community centre in Stratford.

Earlier this year, the Stratford Arts and Culture Collective was awarded a nearly $31,000 Trillium Seed grant to determine how the organization’s proposal could be developed, owned, operated and sustained, and how it might benefit the more than 30 local arts organizations in Stratford and across Perth County that make up the organization’s membership.

“The 30 groups that belong to the Arts and Culture Collective needed to know whether this is an idea that the community would support, whether it was an idea that had legs, whether it was something that could be sustained,” collective co-chair Ron Dodson said. “So we came together as a collective to say, ‘How do we find this out,’ and launching a feasibility study was the best way to do it.”

With funding from the Trillium Foundation, the Supporting Performing Arts in Rural and Remote Communities organization, and a community grant from the City of Stratford, as well as some money from the collective itself, the Stratford Arts and Culture Collective hired Toronto’s TCI Consulting to conduct the study. The final report will be presented to the organization on Nov. 26.

“The money that was granted is called a Seed grant, and these are for new, untested ideas,” said Rena Spevack Orr, a member of the Trillium Foundation’s grant review committee. “And sometimes if the Seed grant works, they can go further and apply for a Grow grant … so they can take the small project and continue it further. … We’re looking for impact, and your opportunity for impact is much greater when you’ve got multiple players like you have here.”

If proven feasible, the proposed arts and culture centre would be a shared performance space for the use of the collective’s member organizations. Though the collective has not quite nailed down a location, the organization’s board has expressed interest in having the centre developed as part of either the city’s Grand Trunk Community Hub or the Knox Presbyterian Church redevelopment.

“There’s lots of theatres in this area. We’re very blessed,” Perth-Wellington MPP Randy Pettapiece said. “… And they’re all great venues to go to, but it seems the arts and this type of thing is growing all the time … so why not put something like this in Stratford?

“It’s not just for the City of Stratford; there’s organizations throughout Perth County that will come and want to get involved.”

While Stratford may have a number of theatre spaces available for rental during the winter off-season, thanks to the Stratford Festival, many smaller arts organizations and non-profits such as Stratford Summer Music can’t always afford the rental costs. By establishing a communal space that can serve multiple arts disciplines, the collective hopes to foster the growth of as many local arts organizations as possible.

“We’re always looking for places to play,” said Stratford Summer Music general manager Judy Matheson. “Our season is six weeks long, so for Stratford Summer Music to actually build a facility, it makes no sense. … We’re happy to use the places that we’re using around town – we will continue to use those – but there’s still something missing. We still need that perfect auditorium that’s acoustically great, that seats about 300 people.

“We’ve all got things that we want, and I think together, with a whole bunch of different groups, we really think we can use this 365 days a year.”

gsimmons@postmedia.com

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Gerry Forbes: Kick start your Christmas shopping at premier arts and craft sale – Calgary Sun

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Christmas will be upon us before you know it and if you want to knock off all your shopping in one day, this might be the day to do it.

It’s all happening downtown at the Telus Convention Centre, where the Art Market Art & Craft Sale is on until Sunday.

There’s a huge number of vendors with one-of-a-kind gifts at some 200 booths set up for your shopping pleasure, all under one roof.

All of the crafts are handmade and come from all across Canada and they have everything from home decor, jewelry, wall decor, fashion, personal care, pottery, wood to all kinds of handmade toys for children.

Whether it’s a cool centrepiece for your Christmas dinner table or hand-crafted wine racks and wall features, there is something there for everyone.

The food section is amazing, with caramel and chocolate-covered apples to chocolates and some great Canadian spirits and wines.

They also have mitts, scarfs, coats, handbags, backpacks and leather goods.

The personal care section has soaps, shaving tools and brushes, creams, fragrances and some pretty neat skin and hair-care products.

The great deal at the market is you pay once and you can return with a free entry pass, if you’re pressed for time or just forget someone on your list.

The event is set up for family and friends, with a cash bar or a quick bite at the on-site café they will have set up there at the convention centre.

They will have a live band Thursday and Friday, and artisan demonstrations on all four days of the sale along with those 50 categories of unique gifts.

The entry fee is $12 for adults and $10 for seniors and students age 18 and under. Kids under age 12 get in free of charge, plus everyone who purchases a ticket is in for a chance to win a $1,000 shopping spree.

The best parking for the event is lot 36 at City Hall Parkade, 322 9 Ave S.E.

If you need any more details or a full list of vendors just got to the web page at www.artmarketcraftsale.com/artisans/

Ready Gerry Forbes in the Sun on Thursday and Sunday

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