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The smaller the better at the Teeny Tiny Art Show – Pique Newsmagazine

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What is it about tiny things that are so compelling?

We all seem to scrunch up our faces, emit an “awww,” followed by a “that’s so cute!” at the mere site of something that’s simply smaller than usual.

Mo Douglas, executive director of Arts Whistler, has a theory.

“I think it all comes from baby animals—and baby humans,” she says. “There’s something about tiny things we love. I don’t know if it’s because it’s such a departure from what we normally relate to.”

To that end, Arts Whistler is bringing back its Teeny Tiny Art Show for a third year, starting with a kick-off party on Sept. 12 at The Gallery at the Maury Young Arts Centre.

This time around, a callout attracted a whopping 90 artists, who turned in pieces on three-inch-by-three-inch (7.6-centimetre-by-7.6-cm) canvasses.

“It’s really clever,” Douglas says. “Some beautiful stuff, some funny stuff, original art that’s really affordable. That’s what’s fun.”

In past years, artists have submitted crocheted pieces (“someone had crocheted the world’s tiniest sofa”), detailed landscapes and other 3D pieces.

“It either tends to be skill or cleverness at that size—sometimes both,” Douglas says. “So many people do cool things with this that it’s a really fun one to look at. The scope of ideas is jaw dropping.”

The tiny theme doesn’t end there, though. At the opening party—which is free and runs from 7 to 10 p.m.—you will also find tiny food and beverages as well as a “do-it-yourself, mini-masterpiece creation station” where you can try your hand at making your own tiny art.

“We got a hold of a number of extra three-by-three [canvases] and we’ll have a little painting station if people want to do their own teeny tiny masterpieces. We’ll have a public participation frame. All the do-it-yourself masterpieces will be able to live there,” Douglas says.

All the art will also be up for grabs—at a reasonable rate. “I’ve seen work priced from $15 to crazy, ornate creations at $75,” she adds. “It’s really affordable.”

The show is just the first event in Arts Whistler’s Fall for Arts season—well, technically, the second, if you count the actual Fall For Arts kick-off party that starts just before the exhibit opening in front of the Maury Young Arts Centre at 6 p.m.

That party will include live music, button-making, artists painting on site and roving entertainers. “This year, we’ve aligned the launch party and the Teeny Tiny show,” Douglas says. “Some Assembly Required is performing from 6 to 7 p.m. by the piano, Dave Petko and Taka Sudo will be live mural painting, and Paintertainment will have lots of photo ops and fun. There will also be button making for adults and kids. It’s funny how our button-making machine is a crowd favourite.”

This is the fourth year of the Fall for Arts season and it’s picked up plenty of traction, Douglas says.

“On its heels is the first Arts Whistler Live show with T Riley and the Bourbon Rebels starting it off with swing, jazz, and blues,” she says. “They come with a swing dance coach, so you can come at 7 and learn some of the steps. These guys are hot. They’ve got a great video, and a super fun look. It’s a good high-energy start to the season.”

For more information on any of the events, visit artswhistler.com/fallforarts.

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PHOTOS: Huge crowd flocks to annual Mission Arts Council Christmas Craft Market – Mission City Record

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Heritage Park School was a hub of activity this weekend for the annual Mission Arts Council Christmas Craft Market.

Patrons stood shoulder to shoulder viewing everything from chocolates to knitted garments to metalwork and acrylic paintings offered by the more than 100 vendors.

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Non-profit Tides Contemporary Art Gallery opens in Kentville – The Guardian

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KENTVILLE, N.S. —

The Annapolis Valley’s newest art gallery is now open in Kentville. 

Tides Contemporary Art Gallery is non-profit gallery that features the work of more than a dozen established and emerging artists from Kings County and southwestern Nova Scotia.

It’s a project of the Kentville Art Gallery Society, and is the space formerly occupied by the Hardware Gallery, across the street from the Kings County Museum.

The new gallery is a co-op, with staffing provided mainly by the artists themselves and some volunteers. Operating costs are covered by membership fees, so the gallery already has its first year of expenses and marketing costs in the bank.

Gallery co-ordinator and society chair Bob Hainstock said the co-op model makes the most sense for a new gallery. 

“Private ownership starting a new gallery with private money, it’s just not happening anymore,” he said. 

The featured artists sit the gallery from one to three days a month, which means there are no staffing costs so money can be spent on marketing.

“To establish a gallery again in Kentville is going to take a lot of marketing.”

He said the gallery has a good mix. 

Bob Hainstock poses for a photo at the new Tides Contemporary Art Gallery in Kentville. Hainstock, the gallery co-ordinator, says co-ops are a good model when opening new galleries. – Ian Fairclough

A varied palette of artists

There are established artists with international reputations and exposure in top New York and Toronto galleries, as well as several some just beginning their exhibition experience. Artists will change their exhibition work every month.

Among those showing are Maggie Schmidt Mandell, Roy Mandell, Carolyn Mallory, Wayne Boucher and Gundrun Mueller-Both.

“We’ve  concentrated mainly on painters and print makers: the wall artists,” Hainstock said. “Now we have to make an effort to get the floor artists, the sculptors, the metal, fibre and wood people.”

There is a waiting list of about a dozen artists hoping to get into the gallery, and Hainstock said he would love to see more artist co-ops get established, and said the model has proven successful elsewhere.

The town owns the building and wants to sell, so Hainstock said it’s critical that the gallery achieve success during its two-year lease.

He said the society would also like to develop the second floor of the building and put in a print-makers co-op, potters co-op and an educational co-op that would put on classes and workshops in a huge array of arts and crafts mediums.

“We want to make this whole area very active, with a lot of traffic coming into Kentville to either look or take part in the arts and culture activities,” he said. 

“Arts and culture enterprises are providing a new energy and confidence in small towns, that you don’t have to bring in the big manufacturing plants or count on government jobs anymore.”

He said more and more people who are retiring, or nearing retirement age, are taking up interests in the arts “and finding out that they’re damn good at it. They’re getting a satisfaction of ‘hey, who knew I was an artist?’”

That also helps fuel galleries, he said. 

The gallery will also feature an art gift boutique and art rental program. The gift boutique will feature smaller, less expensive pieces. The art rental program is designed for home or office and includes rent-to-own features, as well as opportunities for business rewards to company employees or customers.

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Non-profit Tides Contemporary Art Gallery opens in Kentville – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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The Annapolis Valley’s newest art gallery is now open in Kentville. 

Tides Contemporary Art Gallery is non-profit gallery that features the work of more than a dozen established and emerging artists from Kings County and southwestern Nova Scotia.

It’s a project of the Kentville Art Gallery Society, and is the space formerly occupied by the Hardware Gallery, across the street from the Kings County Museum.

The new gallery is a co-op, with staffing provided mainly by the artists themselves and some volunteers. Operating costs are covered by membership fees, so the gallery already has its first year of expenses and marketing costs in the bank.

Gallery coordinator and society chair Bob Hainstock said the co-op model makes the most sense for a new gallery. 

“Private ownership starting a new gallery with private money, it’s just not happening anymore,” he said. 

The featured artists sit the gallery from one to three days a month, which means there are no staffing costs so money can be spent on marketing.

“To establish a gallery again in Kentville is going to take a lot of marketing.”

He said the gallery has a good mix. 

There are established artists with international reputations and exposure in top New York and Toronto galleries, as well as several some just beginning their exhibition experience. Artists will change their exhibition work every month.

Among those showing are Maggie Schmidt Mandell, Roy Mandell, Carolyn Mallory, Wayne Boucher and Gundrun Mueller-Both.

“We’ve  concentrated mainly on painters and print makers: the wall artists,” Hainstock said. “Now we have to make an effort to get the floor artists, the sculptors, the metal, fibre and wood people.”

There is a waiting list of about a dozen artists hoping to get into the gallery, and Hainstock said he would love to see more artist co-ops get established, and said the model has proven successful elsewhere.

The town owns the building and wants to sell, so Hainstock said it’s critical that the gallery achieve success during its two-year lease.

He said the society would also like to develop the second floor of the building and put in a print-makers co-op, potters co-op and an educational co-op that would put on classes and workshops in a huge array of arts and crafts mediums.

“We want to make this whole area very active, with a lot of traffic coming into Kentville to either look or take part in the arts and culture activities,” he said. 
“Arts and culture enterprises are providing a new energy and confidence in small towns, that you don’t have to bring in the big manufacturing plants or count on government jobs anymore.”

He said more and more people who are retiring, or nearing retirement age, are taking up interests in the arts “and finding out that they’re damn good at it. They’re getting a satisfaction of ‘hey, who knew I was an artist?’”

That also helps fuel galleries, he said. 

The gallery will also feature an art gift boutique and art rental program. The gift boutique will feature smaller, less expensive pieces. The art rental program is designed for home or office and includes rent-to-own features, as well as opportunities for business rewards to company employees or customers.

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