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Storm Area 51 Event Is This Week – 1063thebuzz.com

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Well, here we are, the great raid on Area 51 is supposed to take place this Friday. But will it? The best answer to that is both YES and NO.

YES, something is going to happen this week in association with UFOs and Area 51, but NO, it’s probably not going to be a bunch of people charging toward the gate of the Air Force Base in an all out naruto run. And that’s a good thing.

Here’s what IS going down this weekend. There will be what is shaping up to be a fun and informative Storm Area 51 Basecamp gathering at the Alien Research Center on the Extraterrestrial Highway in Hiko, Nevada. In addition to food trucks, the typical portable facilities and some live music, this event will also have several notable speakers making presentations on all things alien. There will even be a special screening of the Netflix documentary, Bob Lazar: Area 51 & Flying Saucers, complete with cast members making personal appearances. This event is geared more for the serious students of the subject who want to get together, have some fun, compare notes, meet like-minded people, and learn some new information. This is not simply a rave in the desert.

The rave is going on over in Las Vegas. This one, the Area 51 Celebration, is more party and less alien. Unless you count the Area 51 beers that the Bud Light people brewed up for the occasion.

Image courtesy Thrillist.com

The way that this came about is one of those things born of the internet. One Mr. Matty Roberts created a Facebook event calling on people to Storm Area 51. It caught on. It caught on big time. In fact it caught on so big that Matty Roberts was afraid people would actually try to storm the Air Force Base. Not wanting anyone to get hurt, he and Brock Daily, co-host of his Facebook event, created Alienstock, a big party in the desert.

This was originally going to be centered around the Little A’Le’Inn in Rachel, Nevada. Management from the Little A’Le’Inn was on-board and plans were laid. Parking permits were issued in anticipation of the crowd to come. Bands were booked. Facilities were procured. Then things got weird. Roberts and Daily became uncomfortable with the information they were getting from the venue and eventually parted ways with that location. This was actually a relief to the other hundred or so residents of Rachel, Nevada, who were somewhat apprehensive of what might be headed their way. With the Little A’Le’Inn location out, the Alienstock organizers started looking for a new location and they found one in the Downtown Las Vegas Events Center.

The Area 51 Celebration in Las Vegas is scheduled for Thursday night, September 19th, and about 8,000 people are expected to attend the free event. The venue is capable of handling crowds up to 12,000 so the necessary infrastructure is there and it should be a really good time.

If everything goes as planned this is probably the best possible outcomes from what started as Facebook joke. Those who are serious about ufology can go to the event at the Alien Research Center, and those looking for another excuse to have a good time can do so in downtown Las Vegas.

Hopefully no one will actually try to storm Area 51. We’re all curious about what’s inside, but don’t do that.

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NASA: Boeing Spaceflights Are Way Pricier Than SpaceX – Futurism

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Pricey Ticket

According to a recent report by NASA’s inspector general, the projected seat price for sending an astronaut to the International Space Station is 60 percent higher on board Boeing’s Starliner than on SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft — about $90 million and $55 million, respectively.

Surprisingly, Boeing’s price is actually more than what Russia’s space corporation Roscosmos currently charges to send American astronauts to the space station on board a Soyuz spacecraft, as Ars Technica points out. Since 2017, NASA had to pay Russia an average of $79.7 mission per seat.

Boeing has been pressing NASA for additional funding for a number of years, trying to secure far more money for crewed missions than what NASA and Boeing had previously agreed upon, Ars Technica reports.

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NASA’s report also revealed that Boeing not only is charging more per ticket than SpaceX, but the development turned out to be far more expensive as well. According to the report, Boeing asked NASA for an additional $287.2 million in 2016, while “SpaceX was not provided the same opportunity as Boeing to propose a solution.”

And yet NASA kept Boeing on as a “second crew transportation provider” to keep its options open.

The report also mentions the difficulties each contractor is facing in developing a sustainable and safe method of sending American astronauts to the space station. SpaceX’s efforts in developing its Crew Dragon spacecraft hit a major roadblock when the company’s testing capsule exploded in a ball of smoke back in April.

READ MORE: NASA report finds Boeing seat prices are 60% higher than SpaceX [Ars Technica]

More on Boeing and SpaceX: Here’s Why Elon Musk is Feuding With the Head of NASA

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Astronauts start spacewalk series to fix cosmic ray detector

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Astronauts launched an extraordinarily complicated series of spacewalks Friday to fix a cosmic ray detector at the International Space Station.

Armed with dozens of dissecting tools, Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano removed two protective covers to gain access to the inside of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. He handed them to his U.S. spacewalking partner, American Andrew Morgan, for tossing overboard.

“OK, 3-2-1, release,” Morgan said as he let go of the 4-foot-long (127-centimetre) shield high above the Pacific.

Later, over the South Atlantic, Morgan ditched the second, smaller cover. “Another great pitch,” Mission Control radioed.

These latest pieces of space junk pose no danger to the orbiting lab, according to NASA. The larger shield should remain in orbit a year or so before re-entering the atmosphere and burning up. The smaller one should re-enter in a few weeks.

NASA considers these spacewalks the most difficult since the Hubble Space Telescope repairs a few decades ago. Unlike Hubble, the spectrometer was never meant to undergo space surgery. After 8 1/2 years in orbit, its cooling system is almost dead.

Parmitano and Morgan will go out at least four times this month and next to revitalize the instrument. Their second spacewalk is next Friday.

Delivered to orbit by Endeavour in 2011 on the next-to-last space shuttle flight, the $2 billion spectrometer is hunting for elusive antimatter and dark matter.

It’s already studied more than 148 billion charged cosmic rays. That’s more than what was collected in over a century by high-altitude balloons and small satellites, said lead scientist Samuel Ting, a Nobel laureate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He monitored Friday’s 6 1/2-hour spacewalk from Mission Control in Houston.

The huge spectrometer — 16 feet by 13 feet by 10 feet (5 metres by 4 metres by 3 metres), with a mass of 7 1/2 tons (6,800 kilograms) — was designed to operate for three years. By installing four new and improved coolant pumps, the astronauts can keep it working throughout the life of the space station, or another five to 10 years. The replacement pumps arrived at the space station nearly two weeks ago, along with an assortment of new tools.

Parmitano, the lead spacewalker, and Morgan trained extensively for the plumbing job before rocketing into orbit in July. They hustled through Friday’s cover removals and even got a jump on future chores.

Next week’s spacewalk will involve slicing through stainless steel tubes and splicing in connections for the new pumps, which like the old will use liquid carbon dioxide as the coolant.

In some respects, this work, 250 miles (400 kilometres) up, is even trickier than the Hubble spacewalks, said NASA project manager Ken Bollweg. As before, the stakes are high.

“Any time you do heart surgery you’re taking some risks,” Bollweg said in an interview earlier this week.

Morgan is an emergency physician in the Army — a bonus for this kind of intricate work. He’s making his first spaceflight.

For second-time station resident Parmitano, it marked his return to spacewalking following a close call in 2013. He almost drowned when his helmet flooded with water from the cooling system of his spacesuit. Unable to talk because of the rising water, he managed to keep his cool as he made his way back to the safe confines of the space station.

Marcia Dunn, The Associated Press

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NASA overpaid Boeing by hundreds of millions of dollars: Auditor – Hindustan Times

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NASA “overpaid” Boeing by hundreds of millions of dollars on a fixed contract to develop a spaceship to carry astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS), an audit report has said, compensation it called “unnecessary.”

The US has relied on Russia to transport its crews to the ISS since the end of the Space Shuttle program in 2011, but has hired Boeing and SpaceX under multi-billion dollar contracts, with the two companies already two years behind schedule.

“We found that NASA agreed to pay an additional $287.2 million above Boeing’s fixed prices to mitigate a perceived 18-month gap in ISS flights anticipated in 2019,” the inspector general’s report issued Thursday said.

“We question $187 million of these price increases as unnecessary costs,” it added.

The auditors determined the amount of additional spending was not required because the risk of such a gap occurring was minimal, and SpaceX was not provided an opportunity to propose a solution “even though the company previously offered shorter production lead times than Boeing.”

What’s more, NASA failed to consider in their analysis that they could overcome any perceived gap by purchasing more seats either directly from Russia or from Boeing.

In fact, five days after NASA committed to paying the $287.2 million, Boeing proposed to sell NASA five seats on the Russian spacecraft Soyuz during the same mission period, a sale completed for an additional $373.5 million, the report found.

But the report’s authors added: “We acknowledge the benefit of hindsight and appreciate the pressures faced by NASA managers at the time to keep the program on schedule to the extent possible.”

The Commercial Crew Program has been beset by delays as the two companies face technical and safety challenges.

As of May 2019, Boeing and SpaceX’s contracts were valued at $4.3 billion and $2.5 billion, with each company awarded six round-trip missions to the ISS.

Assuming four astronauts per flight, the inspector general estimated average cost per seat at $90 million for Boeing and $55 million for SpaceX.

NASA contested the findings, saying in a written response that “We do not agree that the dollar amounts cited were questionable, unnecessary, or unreasonable.”

The report was also a blow for Boeing, which is in the midst of one of the most serious crises in its history following the grounding of its 737 MAX airplanes after two recent crashes killed 346 people.

The aerospace giant has come under fire by critics who allege it rushed the plane’s production to match its Airbus competitor, compromising safety.

Responding to the report, Boeing defended its extra billing to NASA saying it offered “additional flexibility and schedule resiliency.”

It also contested that its average cost per seat was $90 million, saying the actual value was “significantly less” but declined to give a price.

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