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2020 Media AOY Bronze: UM proves its worth – Media In Canada

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Like everyone else, UM was blindsided by the pandemic. But unlike some, the agency had already begun looking at changes to its structure and process prior to the crisis. As a result, its phones have been ringing off the hook with calls from clients this year.

“We had been on the journey to drive greater efficiency and agility into our structure and process well before COVID hit,” says Shelley Smit, UM president.

For example, to help clients address the rapid change around them, Smit says the agency expanded the scope of its consulting services. Consulting is a part of UM’s core offering and covers many aspects of a client’s business from growing brand health to creating digital roadmaps and building data strategies to market mix modeling, she says.

“In a recent example, we successfully designed and facilitated a three-year growth plan workshop for a client, which involved senior stakeholders from various disciplines across their business,” she says.

UM also retooled its planning approach to be able to build better plans for sustained growth, which it calls “full funnel forensics.” Canadian marketplace data has now been integrated directly into its planning system on a category level to optimize plans for different client business goals versus just campaign metrics.

Thought leadership and communication have always been important in building strong client relationships, says Smit, and the impacts of the pandemic accelerated its efforts to a greater extent. For instance, UM created what it calls The Moment: a dynamic, weekly client update of business news, insights, and timely innovations to fuel smarter decision making.

The newsletter is customized for each client and contains both broad industry updates as well as agency POVs on marketplace trends. Smit explains that The Moment initially ran as a pilot prior to the lockdown and has since been expanded.

New talent was also hired and new “power roles” were created in marketing consulting, investment optimization, e-commerce and retail strategy, advanced analytics, modeling, and data management, plus the expansion of its decision sciences team. UM also created a Canadian IPG Media Lab, which identifies innovations and emerging trends.

To understand the impact of COVID at all stages, UM developed forecasting tools to inform future activity in both the short and long term. That?s in addition to a business accelerator that helps clients analyze their current business state and, through a deep-dive, workshop-led process, identifies growth opportunities and ways to drive incremental growth.

“While the UM team has done a tremendous job working remotely by staying committed, focused and productive, we really do miss being together. Their commitment to clients and culture throughout this challenging time has been nothing short of amazing,” says Smit.

New key business: SkipTheDishes; Ulta Beauty; Voila by Sobeys; Giant Tiger; Air Canada; Behr Paints; Emirates.

New hires: Petra Moy, head of agency development; Tushar Subramaniam, senior director of analytics; Mustafa Attar, VP, data, tech; Leanne Burnett-Wood, VP investments.

Staff: 253

To see the agency’s winning cases, visit the AOY website

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My golden rule for social media: talk trash to your heart’s content, but do it in private – The Guardian

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My golden rule for social media: talk trash to your heart’s content, but do it in private  The Guardian



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Alternative social media platforms fuel polarization and conspiracies | Watch News Videos Online – Globalnews.ca

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As social media giants begin cracking down on disinformation and misinformation, rival sites are popping up, where anyone can say anything they want and get away with it. Jackson Proskow reports on the new platforms where lies and falsehoods go unchallenged.

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Media outlets shouldn’t have to fight so often for court transparency – The Globe and Mail

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Last week, after legal arguments on behalf of The Globe and Mail and other media, the court released RCMP documents that suggested the gunman behind April’s mass shooting in Nova Scotia was planning his rampage more than a year before the deadly attack.

The Globe story noted that: “A heavily redacted RCMP application for a search warrant revealed that Gabriel Wortman used an online PayPal account to purchase equipment for the mock RCMP vehicle he drove in the April 18-19 killings that left 22 people dead in the province. An RCMP officer subsequently killed him at a gas station in Enfield.”

The public rightly has questions about what the RCMP or other official sources knew about his planning and his obsession with police. It seems clear mistakes were made, from who knew what in those months leading up to the attack, to the police actions during the 13 hours when the gunman rampaged through the province.

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A number of Canadian media outlets believe strongly that it is time for Canadians to know what actions he took and what the police knew. Included in this continuing challenge are CBC, CTV, Chronicle Herald, Halifax Examiner and Global News. They are sharing legal costs in this effort for more documents because they believe Canadians deserve to know.

Search warrants are supposed to be made public after they have been executed with some exceptions and the media should not have to fight so often for this transparency. In the Nova Scotia case, the police have argued that all the information in every document, including the name of an anthropologist who helped on the case, should remain private.

Canadian courts and police are notoriously opaque, and the costs of legal battles to fight for this transparency can be high. So sharing legal costs not only makes sense, and I suspect it also adds to the weight of the argument in court when the media present a single voice.

This is not the only major legal case where the media are pushing for more information.

Another is the case of Alek Minassian, the van driver on trial for killing 10 people and seriously injuring 16 others when he drove a rented van through groups of pedestrians on Toronto’s busy Yonge Street in April, 2018.

The crux of the case is whether he is criminally responsible. His defence team is arguing that his autism spectrum disorder made him unable to rationally appreciate that what he was doing was wrong. The defence asked that videos of his conversations with a psychiatrist not be shown openly after the U.S.-based psychiatrist himself threatened to refuse to testify if they were.

The defence applied for the audio and video footage of those interviews to be sealed or shown in camera. A different coalition of news outlets, including The Globe and Mail, fought the application.

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Justice Anne Molloy said her deepest concern was Mr. Minassian’s right to a fair trial: “He only has one defence available to him. That has been clear right from the beginning.”

Although she agreed to seal any portions of the interviews that are entered as exhibits, she would not agree to play them in camera. Instead, approved media will be able to watch the footage over Zoom, and members of the public will be able to watch at a designated location in downtown Toronto.

“So people will hear it and they will see it. They can report on it. They just won’t have a copy of it,” she said.

Last year, thanks to the media intervention, the judge also agreed that Mr. Minassian’s statement to police when he was arrested should be read into court.

There are times when The Globe and Mail will go to court alone to ask for the release of documents, especially in the case of an exclusive story, but in these important public-interest trials, it generally joins a wide coalition of media. The Globe and Mail follows the rulings of the court, but it is necessary to press for the greatest transparency.

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