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2020 NHL Draft prospect: Jack Quinn defends almost as well as he scores – Habs Eyes on the Prize

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An Ontario Hockey League championship and the berth in the Memorial Cup tournament that follows seemed inevitable for the Ottawa 67’s this season. One of two CHL teams with 50 wins (the QMJHL’s Moncton Wildcats being the other) when the season was halted, they were a proper juggernaut, leading the OHL not just in goals, but also allowing the fewest, outscoring opponents by nearly a two-to-one margin. The season cancellation was therefore devastating news to a club seeking its first CHL title since 1999.

While the team didn’t get to reap the benefits of that stellar play, the young players certainly will when the NHL Draft is held later this year. We’ve already looked at Marco Rossi, who led the league with 120 points and is expected to be a top pick, but his teammate, Jack Quinn, turned a lot of heads in the 62 games he played this year.

Birthplace: Cobden, Ontario
Date of birth: September 19, 2001
Shoots: Right
Position: Right Wing
Height: 6’0”
Weight: 179 lbs.
Team: Ottawa 67’s (OHL)

Part of the difficulty in projecting the two of them is deciding how much weight to give the strength of the team. It’s not just the two draft prospects who had exceptional years; four of the OHL’s top-nine scorers, and five of the top 15, played for Ottawa. No other team had even two players in the top 10. That certainly plays a role in Rossi’s case, as normally a player who scored better than two points per game in his draft year would be in contention for the top pick, not expected to go somewhere around fifth. The confidence isn’t there that he can replicate that type of offence at the NHL level, though he’s still expected to be an effective player.

Despite finishing 30 points behind Rossi on that strong team, Quinn is still regarded as a top-end prospect, ranking just a few spots behind his teammate, and at one outlet actually ahead. The reason for that optimism is that offence isn’t his only trait, and perhaps not even his most impressive one.

Elite Prospects

The most obvious quality of Quinn is his work ethic. He’s relentless in his own end when he doesn’t have the puck, and is a physical defender despite his average build. To go with that tenacity is a good awareness of what’s going on around him, allowing him to easily close down passing lanes and keep his man in check in defensive situations. While defensive lapses are usually features of top-tier forwards, Quinn is the rare prospect for whom own-zone play is a strength.

Those qualities aid in transitions. If he’s not the one who won possession and is carrying the puck himself, he’s finding a spot on the ice where he’s away from pressure to be a support option, and racing into open space to attack the blue line with speed.

He’s just as determined in the offensive zone, and easily forces his way to the high-danger area for scoring chances. That not only improves his opportunities, but opens up lots of options for teammates who had to be abandoned by opposition defenders as they react to Quinn’s presence.

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That close proximity to the goaltender is enough to find success in Junior hockey; many players go on to earn professional contracts based on their willingness to get to dirty areas. Other goal-scorers have shots that are so quick and/or precise that they’re able to beat netminders from distance. without needing to leave the perimeter In Quinn’s case, he has both of those traits, making his prospects of becoming an NHL scorer very high.

Often working in traffic, he isn’t given a lot of space to get a shot off, and his release doesn’t require it. A quick twist of his body with a short backswing is enough for him to generate a lot of torque to get pucks on net even if he has opponents closely monitoring him. An upward motion with his stick while his knee drops to the ice usually allows him to elevate the puck over goalies who believe just taking away the bottom of the net at such close range would be sufficient.

Add his awareness into the mix, and he doesn’t just fire the puck when his path gets closed off and hope the goaltender isn’t there to stop it. He’s often gauging the position of the opponents, getting himself to the best position before taking a higher-percentage shot. All of those abilities combined helped him find the net 52 times in 62 games; the highest goal total among draft-eligible prospects playing in at least the Major Junior ranks (Carter Savoie scored 53 in the Alberta Junior Hockey League).

Rankings

Elite Prospects: #16
Future Considerations: #20
Hockey Prospect: #6
McKeen’s Hockey: #10
McKenzie/TSN: #10
NHL Central Scouting: #7 (North American skaters)

In a first round filled with quality players, Quinn is one of the more all-around talents, which is probably unexpected given his goal-scoring numbers. Even if his finishing ability doesn’t translate — which it should given how faceted it is — his 200-foot game is enough to carry him to at least replacement-level status.

Other than the fact that’s he’s one of the older first-year prospects in 2020, concerns are mostly about his skating ability. He’s not particularly quick and does need time to get to his top gear, instead relying on his awareness and instincts to get an early jump on opponents. That’s not going to happen nearly as often in the NHL, where runways aren’t often left for players to build up speed, and that will limit some of his transition skills.

HockeyProspecting

In a model based on his offence alone, he’s projected to be just about as effective in the attacking end as last year’s top goal-scorer, Cole Caufield. Only a fraction of his production is expected to carry over, but he’ll have little difficulty being a positive-impact player in the NHL.

Jack Quinn is a player who will be high on many draft boards. NHL teams may have some of the more skilled options and better skaters ahead of him, but we won’t be very deep into the first round when one of them calls his name.

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Montoyo says competition on for rotation spot after Anderson’s injury – Sportsnet.ca

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TORONTO – A pathway to the starting rotation for Nate Pearson – or someone else if the Toronto Blue Jays are intent on manipulating their top prospect’s service time – is open after Chase Anderson suffered an oblique strain and is uncertain to be ready for opening day.

Manager Charlie Montoyo says the club still plans to deploy a five-man rotation, which is set to include Hyun-Jin Ryu, Tanner Roark, Matt Shoemaker and Trent Thornton, who ripped through a roughly-60-pitch live batting practice session Sunday.

Given the way he pitched during the first spring training, the work he put on from then to now, and how he impressed again during an intrasquad outing Saturday, Pearson would seem like an automatic in light of Anderson’s injury.

But, since the Blue Jays can push his free agency back a year by assigning him to the club’s Alternate Training Site for about a week, he’s far from a lock to break with the team.

“They’re going to compete for that spot,” Montoyo, without specifying names, said of the club’s young pitchers. “I love the fact that all these guys know they are competing. We’re building them all up, so they’re all going to have a chance to compete. We’ll see where we go a week and a half from now. Other stuff can happen from here to when we start, as you know.”

Beyond Pearson, left-handers Ryan Borucki and Anthony Kay and righty Thomas Hatch are the likeliest other contenders, although the Blue Jays are trying to stretch out other pitchers, too.

“It’s a crazy year, as you know,” said Montoyo, “and we’ve got so many options, which is great for all these kids because they’ll be competing for a spot if Chase is not ready by the time this season starts.”

Anderson hurt himself while loosening up ahead of a recent bullpen and Montoyo said the veteran right-hander was already built up for 3-4 innings of work, building toward more ahead of opening day.

Montoyo described him as day-to-day.

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THORNTON SHARP: Trent Thornton knows better than to take a place in the Blue Jays rotation for granted but he had essentially sewn up a spot during the spring training and he’s right back where he left off at summer camp.

The sophomore righty looked sharp in throwing an estimated 50-60 pitches Sunday, routinely generating poor contacts and awkward swings. He came away pleased with how he felt physically and, after snapping off a pair of pretty curveballs to catch teammates looking, with how he manipulated his pitches.

“I thought I executed pretty much all my pitches,” said Thornton. “Elevated fastball was definitely a point of emphasis today, I thought I did a decent job with that. As far as my off-speed, breaking balls, changeup, cutter all felt really, really good, and felt like I got to accomplish a lot of what I wanted to.”

Thornton was able to throw throughout the shutdown, getting a key to the field from his high school coach so he could get his work in. His dad gave him a weight set for his garage while a trainer allowed him to work out in isolation at his gym.

“I feel great,” he said. “I don’t feel like I missed a beat at all. Within another week or two, I feel like I can just let the reins off.”

Ben Nicholson-Smith is Sportsnet’s baseball editor. Arden Zwelling is a senior writer. Together, they bring you the most in-depth Blue Jays podcast in the league, covering off all the latest news with opinion and analysis, as well as interviews with other insiders and team members.

UNCERTAIN SHUN: Shun Yamaguchi arrived at spring training determined to win a spot in the Blue Jays rotation but appeared to be destined for the bullpen.

Now?

“Same as March. I still haven’t gotten a formal notice on what type of role I’ll be playing in,” Yamaguchi, in comments interpreted Yuto Sakurai, said after logging 30-35 pitches during a couple of innings of live batting practice. “For me, I personally do want to be in a starting role so I’m trying my best to get the fifth spot.”

As things stand, it would appear he has some work to do for that to happen.

Yamaguchi allowed nine runs over nine innings with five walks and six strikeouts in four Grapefruit League games as he transitioned to the North American game after 14 seasons in Japan, and the thinking then was that his stuff would be best utilized in relief.

“At this point, to be honest with you, I’ve been able to adjust to the ball and I have a limited amount of time left until the regular season, so I can’t really be talking about the ball slipping out of my hand and whatnot,” said Yamaguchi. “Every day I’m trying to adjust and throw the ball better.”

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Blue Jays notebook: Shaw 'a little bit more informed' after management meets with Jays players – TSN

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TORONTO — Travis Shaw regrets speaking out in the way he did, but also admits he didn’t know what he and his Blue Jays teammates could be facing this summer when they arrived for summer camp a week ago.

On Friday, the first-year Blue Jays infielder sent out a series of tweets in response to my report on the severe penalties the team was warned about, focusing on the theme that there’s no way the Rogers Centre-Marriott City Centre Hotel quarantine bubble can be their reality all summer if the club is granted permission by the federal government and health authorities to play their 30 regular season games in Toronto.

“All summer isn’t going to happen. Not an option,” the 30-year-old infielder tweeted.

As we reported Friday, Shaw had no idea the quarantine bubble could extend into the regular season if the mandatory 14-day quarantine period is still in place and the Canada-U.S. border remains closed for non-essential travel.

Management decided to finally outline the potential scenarios to the team Saturday.

“We actually had a sitdown meeting,” Shaw said Sunday evening, addressing the topic for the first time on a Zoom call with reporters during the team’s workout. “They met with groups of people in the locker-room. I’m definitely a little bit more informed now than I was, say, a week ago. I kind of know what the deal is going forward. I know they’re still working with the government to get clearance for the regular season. Coming up here, I don’t think anybody thought that we could possibly be in here for three months, but everything’s kind of happening on the fly right now and we’re going to have to adjust accordingly.”

Now, Shaw and his teammates are well aware of just how unique, unenviable and challenging their situation could be, not only for summer camp over the next nine days until they leave for Boston to play a pair of recently-added exhibition games against the Red Sox, but far beyond that.

“It was kind of the first that I was hearing about it that we could possibly be in here all summer,” Shaw said of his initial Twitter response. “It’s not ideal to live in a hotel room for three months. I don’t think anybody would want to be stuck in a hotel room for three months. I like to go on walks, get away from work. Nice days like today in Toronto would be nice to walk by the water but we can’t do that this year and the Canadian government has made that pretty strict and we’re going to have to follow that and I, personally, will follow that.”

The Twitter fight Shaw found himself immersed in with fans and those protecting public health was something he regrets.

“It came out a little differently than I probably should’ve said it,” Shaw said. “I should’ve worded it a little bit differently. I was a little bit tone deaf, given the situation everybody is in right now.

“When we came up here we thought it was only going to be two weeks. We weren’t aware it could possibly be the entire summer.”

The team was told they could face a $750,000 fine and potentially jail time, the maximum penalty in the federal Quarantine Act, if seen outside the stadium walls.

It’s something they’ve all been taking seriously.

They just didn’t know it could be all summer.

“According to our rule sheet it just said $750,000 fine,” Shaw said. “And that is something I’m not going to break, I can promise you that.”

Shaw says the team hasn’t sat down to discuss how they’ll behave on the road when they start travelling to the States next week.

Whether the Jays stay in Toronto this summer, head back to virus-ravaged Dunedin, or find a way to make Sahlen Field in Buffalo work, the MLB clubs that take it upon themselves to self-isolate and stay healthy will have the best chance on the field in 2020.

“We have not discussed that yet,” Shaw said. “I think everybody has to be smart. I can’t sit here and say 100 per cent that everybody is going to stay in their hotel room on the road, either. I think people just have to be smart about it. I do not think people will go out and be selfish and jeopardize our team health and public health.

“Public health, public safety is priority No. 1. Team health, team safety is priority No. 2.”

During the discussion with management Saturday, it was conveyed to players that the club is still sorting through possibilities, but that Toronto is still without a doubt the preference.

“Unfortunately there’s not a lot of options to play somewhere else,” said Shaw, who added he won’t be opting out of this season like some players, even if he has to stay in a hotel room all summer. “The options are very limited. I don’t think anybody wants to play in Dunedin. That could be a competitive disadvantage just because of the heat, the weather and COVID outbreak that’s going on in Florida right now. Options are pretty limited right now.”

ROTATION SPOT AVAILABLE

The Jays’ rotation depth is already being tested a bit, as manager Charlie Montoyo announced Sunday that off-season trade acquisition Chase Anderson suffered a strained oblique and will miss some time.

Montoyo described it as a day-to-day situation, but oblique injuries and pitchers usually don’t mix well.

“He did it getting loose for a bullpen a couple days ago,” Montoyo said.

Slated for a mid-rotation slot, likely No. 4, that will bump Trent Thornton up a rung for the time being and give a host of other candidates a new lease on life.

After looking good in a simulated game on Saturday, lefty Ryan Borucki could be the front-runner, with Nate Pearson and his service time considerations looming after spending at least a week off the roster to begin the season in order to secure another year of team control.

Shut down in February with elbow tightness and toting around a long history of left arm issues, Borucki feels as healthy as he has in a while, adding he’s already built up to 50 pitches in bullpen sessions.

“I feel like I’m in the mix (for a rotation spot),” Borucki said. “I know what I’m capable of doing. I feel like everybody in this organization knows what I’m capable of doing. I showed that off in 2018 and I feel like (Saturday) was a good step to show everybody that maybe wrote me off that I am back and I can get hitters out in the big leagues.”

Borucki has tweaked his repertoire, too, ditching his slider in favour of a cutter, to go along with his fastball-changeup bread and butter.

“I just think the cutter, with the movement that I have on my fastball, really works well off my fastball,” he said. “I work inside to hitters really well and running it back in on them, then I can just throw the cutter right off that same lane and try to jam guys. I feel like it’s a better pitch than that bigger slider for me.”

Hyun-Jin Ryu, who will pitch Monday in an intra-squad game, Matt Shoemaker and Tanner Roark are locked into the first three rotation spots.

PEARSON GAINS CONFIDENCE

Not that he needed anymore confidence after dominating each and every one of his spring training outings, Nate Pearson can puff out his chest even more after carving through the top of the Blue Jays’ order Saturday.

Pearson faced Bo Bichette, Cavan Biggio, who drew a walk, Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Shaw, Randal Grichuk and Rowdy Tellez, not allowing a hit and striking out a pair (Shaw, Grichuk).

“That’s like our ‘A’ lineup and I’ll be facing a lot of ‘A’ lineups once I get my call to the big leagues, and it kind of just showed what my stuff measures up to and I thought I did pretty well,” Pearson said.

Getting ready in this setting has added new wrinkles for everyone, but Pearson was able to get himself mentally ready to stand on a big-league mound.

“I thought it was going to be a little bit different but I was able to pick up the exact adrenaline that I would have in a regular game,” Pearson said of the simulation game setting. “I haven’t been able to pitch in the Rogers Centre a lot so my first time being here as a guy that’s trying to break into the major leagues, it was awesome for me to be out there and I got a lot of adrenaline from it so I didn’t feel like I missed any parts of the environment.”

GURRIEL STILL MISSING

While the Jays continue to essentially “no comment” every question about a missing player or how many are still training in Dunedin, it’s been pretty clear the one key cog that’s missing is starting left fielder Lourdes Gurriel Jr.

No update has been given on the 26-year-old, nor has he been placed on the injured list like Brandon Drury, Jonathan Davis, Elvis Luciano and Hector Perez were a couple weeks ago.

Those five players have still not been spotted in Toronto.

Meanwhile, Austin Martin is now officially in the Jays’ 60-man player pool, but no ETA has been given for the fifth-overall pick.

Martin, like everyone else, would need to go through two COVID-19 tests in Dunedin before he can fly to Toronto to join workouts.

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LeBron James To Forgo Social Justice Message On Back Of Jersey – RealGM.com

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LeBron James will have his last name on the back of his jersey in lieu of a social justice message when the NBA season resumes.

James added that he had no input on the list of messages that players were able to choose from. 

“It was no disrespect to the list that was handed out to all the players. I commend anyone that decides to put something on the back of their jersey. It’s just something that didn’t really seriously resonate with my mission, with my goal.

“I would have loved to have a say-so on what would have went on the back of my jersey. I had a couple things in mind, but I wasn’t part of that process, which is OK. I’m absolutely OK with that. … I don’t need to have something on the back of my jersey for people to understand my mission or know what I’m about and what I’m here to do,” said James.

285 out of a possible 350 eligible players picked out a social justice message to use on the back of their jerseys.

JaVale McGee recently said that he would use “Respect Us,” while Kyle Korver will use “Black Lives Matter.”

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