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2021 social media resolutions – Lethbridge Herald

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By Lethbridge Herald Opinion on December 31, 2020.

Some 4,000 years ago, the ancient Babylonians were the first to make New Year’s resolutions, though, for them, the year began in mid-March when crops were planted. Being someone who doesn’t mess with tradition, I’ve made a few New Year’s resolutions regarding my social media. So you can hold me accountable, I’m sharing them with you.
1. I’ll be giving out more praise and love. 
Unfortunately, much of social media has become toxic – engagement has become tricky. However, you can’t go wrong by giving praise, a sincere thank you, posting appreciation for providing excellent service, or a simple shoutout. Throughout 2021 I’ll be using my social media to add more much-needed love to the world.
2. I’ll stop checking my social media before bed and upon waking up. 
For the good of my mental health – and my insomnia – I’ll stop checking my Twitter, Facebook and Instagram before calling it a day. It’s unhealthy falling asleep to people arguing and tweets evangelizing the latest conspiracy theory. In 2021, instead of stressing myself out at night, I’ll be putting down my phone at least two hours before climbing into bed. 
Come morning, I’ll stop my habit of automatically reaching for my phone when my alarm goes off. I tell myself I’m catching up on current events but is it healthy to start my day stressing about the world’s state, much of which I can’t do anything about? In 2021 I’ll be starting my days drinking warm water with lemon while reciting all I have to be grateful for. Then I’ll do a series of stretches, followed by eating a healthy breakfast BEFORE “maybe” picking up my phone. Whatever wrongs throughout the world people are pointing out can wait.  
3. I’ll stop obsessively checking my posts for number of views and likes.
Ahh, to be loved in the moment – to have approval from strangers – that’s social media’s dopamine. In 2021, I shall post and move on. You’ll notice none of my resolutions have “social media metrics,” such as number of followers, number of retweets or likes. Using numbers to gauge your social media success often leads to narcissism, which I don’t want. Of course, there’ll be the times I’ll post what I deem is a quality meme, and I’ll be curious to see how much love it generated. 
4. I’ll ease up on long posts.
Nobody willingly watches an entire two-minute video of a wind-up chattering teeth or reads a 325-word rant on Facebook that bagels in Toronto are a crime (I grew up in Montreal.). In 2021 I’ll keep in mind: Social media is designed to get to the message faster.
5. I’ll be taking breaks.
Social media being “24×7” or “always open” now dominates pretty much every aspect of our life. This is creating a mental state known as FOMO (Fear of Missing Out), which induces stress. Throughout 2021, whenever I feel it’s necessary, I’ll be stepping back to take mental health breaks – a form of digital detox.
6. I’ll stop wasting time watching YouTube compilations.
This one will be tough. Who doesn’t find it relaxing watching 35 minutes of stupid stunts compilations? I get a few laughs watching a four-minute clip of George Carlin’s routine on airlines and flying. I’ve lost count of how many times I try to get the gist of a movie by watching four to five clips of a movie while telling myself I’m saving time by not watching the two-hour movie.
YouTube has become my time management Achilles heel – in 2021, this needs to stop.
7. I’ll be using less emojis.
I’m addicted to emojis – there I said it. Emojis are easy to use. They efficiently convey an emotion (heart, smiley face, thumbs up). However, some emojis can mean different things to different people. The clown emoji is probably funny to most people. Yet, it can be creepy to anyone who still has nightmares of Stephen King’s “It.”
2021 will see me using emojis sparingly. For the most part, I’ll be communicating textually.
Will I, who lives and breathes social media, be able to follow through with these New Year’s resolutions? It’s possible. I know it won’t happen overnight. After all, Babylon wasn’t built in a day.
Nick Kossovan is the Social Media Co-ordinator for 5n2, a non-profit organization serving over 1,500 free and healthy meals every week throughout Toronto’s east end. You can follow Nick on Instagram and Twitter @NKossovan.

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Social Media Is Dead, Right? Well… – Forbes

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Recently, a friend approached me regarding the future of social media.

She was curious about things like The Social Dilemma, Twitter’s permanent suspension of Trump’s account, and many platforms’ new regulations—and the effect all of this may have on the industry as a whole. It is truly a fantastic question, and as the founder of a social media agency, these are all things that have been top of mind for a long while now.

Here’s how I responded.

Social Media Will Evolve, Not Go Away

Social media is absolutely addictive, and is built to be that way—so that part of The Social Dilemma is true. And this won’t change. Social media will always be addictive, for better or for worse. It is part of human behavior now. Networks will change. They’ll evolve. New ones will emerge. Older ones will die out. But consumer behavior—and the desire to connect and communicate online via networks—is forever here to stay. Users are not leaving social anytime soon. 

I do, however, believe that the recent comeuppance of the false narrative of Trump and his followers has forced the hand of networks to take stronger action to avoid the spread of false information. I strongly believe that this will happen—and it will both be good for the world and affect the stock of some of the networks.

Brands Will Have to Meet People Where They Are

For advertisers, it is imperative to meet people where they are. And if you look at the spends, there is no sign of stopping. The data will tell you this: A third of brands currently spend more on Facebook than any other platform, and 76 percent of brands plan to increase their ad spend in 2021. 44 percent have upped Twitter spending post–Trump removal, and 38 percent have increased on Instagram. If consumers are there, advertisers simply have to be there. 

One interesting observation: In July, there was a Facebook boycott called #StopHateForProfit where brands pulled their advertising from Facebook and demanded the network do more to combat bias, misinformation, harassment, and hate speech on the platform. This initiative was fantastic; however, it did not really hurt Facebook’s bottom line at all—advertisers came right back. Personally, what I found during that time was that advertisers reallocated their dollars. They would ask our team: “Is this the time to try Pinterest advertising? TikTok? What can we do that’s new?” The appetite is not to leave social media; it’s to find an opportunity that meets people where they are in a natural way.

Brands Need to Align with Consumers’ Values

There’s also a deep desire for brands to create content that is good for the world. A recent study from Accenture talked about how consumers want the brands they purchase from to care about the things they care about—including social and environmental issues. In fact, brands that don’t do this could see some big losses! 43 percent of consumers said they will walk away if they’re disappointed by a brands’ words or actions on a social issue—and 21 percent wouldn’t come back. This is new for many brands, and so using social media to lean into the good that they do is transitioning from a “nice-to-do” to a “must-do.”

So, I’m not worried about social media going away. I’m hopeful about it maturing and getting better. I’m not worried about advertisers going away. I’m focused on making sure they know about new networks, and keeping them educated on new platforms and on meeting people where they are. And I’m inspired by the amount of “good content” we will be able to put out into the world. Ultimately, I think that brands will have no choice but to do good—and that’s great.

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Social Media Is Dead, Right? Well… – Forbes

Published

 on


Recently, a friend approached me regarding the future of social media.

She was curious about things like The Social Dilemma, Twitter’s permanent suspension of Trump’s account, and many platforms’ new regulations—and the effect all of this may have on the industry as a whole. It is truly a fantastic question, and as the founder of a social media agency, these are all things that have been top of mind for a long while now.

Here’s how I responded.

Social Media Will Evolve, Not Go Away

Social media is absolutely addictive, and is built to be that way—so that part of The Social Dilemma is true. And this won’t change. Social media will always be addictive, for better or for worse. It is part of human behavior now. Networks will change. They’ll evolve. New ones will emerge. Older ones will die out. But consumer behavior—and the desire to connect and communicate online via networks—is forever here to stay. Users are not leaving social anytime soon. 

I do, however, believe that the recent comeuppance of the false narrative of Trump and his followers has forced the hand of networks to take stronger action to avoid the spread of false information. I strongly believe that this will happen—and it will both be good for the world and affect the stock of some of the networks.

Brands Will Have to Meet People Where They Are

For advertisers, it is imperative to meet people where they are. And if you look at the spends, there is no sign of stopping. The data will tell you this: A third of brands currently spend more on Facebook than any other platform, and 76 percent of brands plan to increase their ad spend in 2021. 44 percent have upped Twitter spending post–Trump removal, and 38 percent have increased on Instagram. If consumers are there, advertisers simply have to be there. 

One interesting observation: In July, there was a Facebook boycott called #StopHateForProfit where brands pulled their advertising from Facebook and demanded the network do more to combat bias, misinformation, harassment, and hate speech on the platform. This initiative was fantastic; however, it did not really hurt Facebook’s bottom line at all—advertisers came right back. Personally, what I found during that time was that advertisers reallocated their dollars. They would ask our team: “Is this the time to try Pinterest advertising? TikTok? What can we do that’s new?” The appetite is not to leave social media; it’s to find an opportunity that meets people where they are in a natural way.

Brands Need to Align with Consumers’ Values

There’s also a deep desire for brands to create content that is good for the world. A recent study from Accenture talked about how consumers want the brands they purchase from to care about the things they care about—including social and environmental issues. In fact, brands that don’t do this could see some big losses! 43 percent of consumers said they will walk away if they’re disappointed by a brands’ words or actions on a social issue—and 21 percent wouldn’t come back. This is new for many brands, and so using social media to lean into the good that they do is transitioning from a “nice-to-do” to a “must-do.”

So, I’m not worried about social media going away. I’m hopeful about it maturing and getting better. I’m not worried about advertisers going away. I’m focused on making sure they know about new networks, and keeping them educated on new platforms and on meeting people where they are. And I’m inspired by the amount of “good content” we will be able to put out into the world. Ultimately, I think that brands will have no choice but to do good—and that’s great.

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Different types of gambling, media converging for growth – 570 News

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ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — The many different types of gambling are quickly coming together with each other and with media outlets — and Wall Street is taking notice.

Casino gambling, internet gambling, sports betting and daily fantasy sports are no longer separate silos with unique audiences: Gambling companies are increasingly combining them and partnering with media companies to expand the reach of gambling.

This expansion is leading Wall Street analysts to predict fast-growing revenue in the U.S. over the next five to 10 years. Morgan Stanley sees a $15 billion sports betting and internet gambling market by 2025, and Macquarie Research says that same market could be $30 billion by 2030.

“The once disparate categories of online gaming, media and sports are joining teams to create powerful partnerships that we believe will grow viewership, increase overall fan engagement, and drive significantly higher market values for all those connected,” Macquarie wrote in a report issued Tuesday.

It cited numerous examples of deals between sports betting and media companies last year, including Bally’s and Sinclair Broadcasting; Flutter Entertainment and FOX; PointsBet and NBC; William Hill and CBS; DraftKings and Caesars Entertainment partnering with ESPN; Penn National and Barstool Sports; BetMGM and Yahoo; and Turner Sports’ deals with FanDuel and DraftKings.

David Schwartz, a gambling historian with the University of Nevada Las Vegas, said combinations like these “seem to be the wave of the future.”

“With geographic expansion nearly complete in the U.S. — Texas is the biggest unserved market still out there — casino companies are looking to grow their revenues by expanding into new forms of gambling, (and) online and sports betting are the most prominent,” he said. “Even daily fantasy sports is seen as a viable route, as seen by recent moves by Bally’s and Caesars. The media partners get more content and more eyes on their product.”

Bill Miller, president of the American Gaming Association, the gambling industry’s national trade association, said deals like these are “a logical extension” of the industry’s desire to keep pace with customer expectations.

“Responsibly growing these verticals will be essential to the industry’s continued success,” he said.

In a report last week, Morgan Stanley forecast a $15 billion market for sports betting and internet gambling by 2025, an increase of 27% over current levels. As much as $10 billion of that is likely to come from sports betting, the company said.

Most analysts expect at least half the country will have legal sports betting by the end of 2021, with continued expansion after that.

Morgan Stanley said sports betting and internet gambling revenue reached $3.1 billion in the U.S. last year, well outpacing its forecast of $2 billion. While some of the growth in online wagering was undoubtedly helped by months of casino closures during the coronavirus pandemic, Morgan Stanley says there’s a durable market taking shape in these industries.

“We see legalized U.S. sports betting and iGaming as a once-in-a-generation shift for what was a mature gaming industry,” Morgan Stanley wrote. “It is clear to us that Americans’ interest in sports and gambling should lead to higher revenue (per) adult than we previously expected.”

___

Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAC.

Wayne Parry, The Associated Press

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