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4 Takeaways From Ross Atkins' Latest Blue Jays Media Chat – Sports Illustrated

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DUNEDIN, Fla. — With Toronto Blue Jays hitters taking batting practice in the background and players boarding buses destined for a Clearwater spring training contest, GM Ross Atkins spoke to the media.

The Blue Jays leader gave an update on spring training logistics, talked about settling with arbitration-eligible players, and talked about Toronto’s roster construction ahead of the 2022 season. Read the top takeaways from Atkins’ media scrum below:

Arbitration Averted

With arbitration hearings delayed into the season and filing deadline pushed to March 22, Atkins and the Blue Jays managed to settle with all 11 arb eligible players on Tuesday.

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“There was a big part of us that was very hopeful that we could avoid [in-season arb hearings],” Atkins said. “But we still had to stay disciplined to a process and respect that fact that there was a possibility we could be in a room.”

Some of the key agreements came with Vladimir Guerrero Jr. ($7.9 million), Teoscar Hernández ($10.65 million), and a two-year deal for Matt Chapman, buying out both his remaining arb years for $25 million.

“I feel really fortunate that we had similar motivations,” Atkins said on Chapman.

How Blue Jays Will Use 28-Man Roster Expansion

New York Post’s Joel Sherman reported on Tuesday that the MLB and union agreed to a temporarily expanded roster, allowing 28 MLB players per roster until May 1.

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The Jays have already looked at different ways to use the new roster spots, Atkins said, but the GM pointed to health of the starting rotation as the biggest deciding factor on what they’ll do. 

One potential use of the extra spots is expanding the rotation to six pitchers, given limited workload buildups, Atkins discussed. Nate Pearson and Ross Stripling are two names Atkins brought up when talking about a six-man rotation, and both could also slot into long-man roles, too.

With Reese McGuire, Alejandro Kirk, and Danny Jansen all pushing for playing time behind the plate, Atkins also said the 28-man roster could allow the Jays to carry three catchers early in the season.

Confidence In Rebuilt Bullpen

If Pearson and Stripling aren’t in the rotation, they’ll likely be in the mix for Toronto’s 2022 bullpen, joining Jordan Romano, Tim Mayza, and others.

A clear weakness on the 2021 squad, Atkins expressed confidence in the bullpen group to continue solid play from the stretch run last season into 2022. With the fickle nature of a pen, though, Toronto’s arm barn will still be an area of focus this season.

“I think even the best bullpens in baseball, they’re not relaxing and thinking okay we’re fine,” Atkins said. “So finding ways to build depth internally and being prepared to do so externally is really important.”

Moreno, García Incoming

Reliever Yimi García and prospect Gabriel Moreno have not yet arrived in Blue Jays spring camp due to visa issues, but their presence is expected soon.

They’re incoming, Atkins said, and could arrive at camp on Thursday. García has been undergoing a disciplined pitching build-up, Atkins said, but the Blue Jays are still trying to piece together where Moreno is in his preseason routines.

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Why social media makes you feel bad

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Have you ever found yourself scrolling through social media and noticed you felt a bit down? Maybe a little envious? Why aren’t you on a yacht? Running a startup? Looking amazing 24/7?

The good news is you are not alone. Although social media has some benefits, it can also make us feel a little depressed.

Why does social media make us feel bad?

As humans we inherently compare ourselves to others to determine our self-worth. Psychologists call this social comparison theory.

We primarily make two types of comparisons: upward and downward comparisons.

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Upward comparisons occur when we compare ourselves to someone else (in real life or on social media) and feel they are better than us (an unfavourable comparison for us) in whatever domain we are assessing (such as status, beauty, abilities, success, and so on).

For example, comparing your day at work to your friend’s post from the ski fields (we’re looking at you Dave!) is likely to be an upward comparison. Another example is making appearance comparisons which can make you feel worse about yourself or your looks .

Although upward comparison can sometimes motivate you to do better, this depends on the change being achievable and on your esteem. Research suggests upward comparisons may be particularly damaging if you have low self-esteem.

In contrast, downward comparisons occur when we view ourselves more favourably than the other person – for example, by comparing yourself to someone less fortunate. Downward comparisons make us feel better about ourselves but are rare in social media because people don’t tend to post about the mundane realities of life.

 

Comparisons in social media

Social media showcases the best of people’s lives. It presents a carefully curated version of reality and presents it as fact. Sometimes, as with influencers, this is intentional but often it is unconscious bias. We are just naturally more likely to post when we are happy, on holiday or to share successes – and even then we choose the best version to share.

When we compare ourselves to what we see on social media, we typically make upward comparisons which make us feel worse. We compare ourselves on an average day to others on their best day. In fact, it’s not even their best day. It’s often a perfectly curated, photoshopped, produced, filter-applied moment. It’s not a fair comparison.

That’s not to say social media is all bad. It can help people feel supportedconnected, and get information. So don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. Instead, keep your social media use in check with these tips.

 

Concrete ways you can make yourself feel better about social media

Monitor your reactions. If social media is enjoyable, you may not need to change anything – but if it’s making you exhausted, depressed or anxious, or you are losing time to mindless scrolling, it’s time for change.

Avoid comparisons. Remind yourself that comparing your reality with a selected moment on social media is an unrealistic benchmark. This is especially the case with high-profile accounts who are paid to create perfect content.

Be selective. If you must compare, search for downward comparisons (with those who are worse off) or more equal comparisons to help you feel better. This might include unfollowing celebrities, focusing on real posts by friends, or using reality focused platforms like BeReal.

Redefine success. Influencers and celebrities make luxury seem like the norm. Most people don’t live in pristine homes and sip barista-made coffee in white sheets looking perfect. Consider what real success means to you and measure yourself against that instead.

Practise gratitude. Remind yourself of things that are great in your life, and celebrate your accomplishments (big and small!). Create a “happy me” folder of your favourite life moments, pics with friends, and great pictures of yourself, and look at this if you find yourself falling into the comparison trap.

Unplug. If needed, take a break, or cut down. Avoid mindless scrolling by moving tempting apps to the last page of your phone or use in-built focus features on your device. Alternatively, use an app to temporarily block yourself from social media.

Engage in real life. Sometimes social media makes people notice what is missing in their own lives, which can encourage growth. Get out with friends, start a new hobby, embrace life away from the screen.

Get amongst nature. Nature has health and mood benefits that combat screen time.

Be the change. Avoid only sharing the picture-perfect version of your life and share (in a safe setting) your real life. You’d be surprised how this will resonate with others. This will help you and them feel better.

Seek help. If you are feeling depressed or anxious over a period of time, get support. Talk to your friends, family or a GP about how you are feeling. Alternatively contact one of the support lines like LifelineKids Helpline, or 13Yarn.

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Social Media Buzz: Mt. Washington, Balloon, Adani, Kyrie Irving – Bloomberg

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Social Media Buzz: Mt. Washington, Balloon, Adani, Kyrie Irving  Bloomberg

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Canada adds Russian media personalities, companies in latest round of sanctions – CP24

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  1. Canada adds Russian media personalities, companies in latest round of sanctions  CP24
  2. Canada adds Russian media personalities, companies in latest round of sanctions  Halifax.CityNews.ca

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