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'50% Of Americans' Is Trending On Social Media – What It Says About Our Divided Nation – Forbes

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It has long been said that people either see a glass as half empty or half full – which is meant to suggest whether one is a pessimist or an optimist. In reality, 50% is always half, something that is perhaps lost to those on social media this week.

On Wednesday, a USA Today/Suffolk University poll found that 50% of Americans now predict that history will judge President Trump as a “failed” president. Most actual historians would say it is simply impossible to know how history will judge Trump as the lasting impact of his policies won’t be known.

History has generally been more favorable years after a president leaves the White House. Presidents Ford, Carter and both Bushes weren’t exactly seen in the most positive light immediately after their respective departures from the Oval Office, but all are now seen far more favorably.

Of course, it didn’t take long for the comments to fly on social media – and once again social media showed how divided the nation is, with many stating their contempt for the President, while others offered their continued support.

Some of the comments were downright hateful, and with comments such as those from @RepublicanSwine, “50% of Americans. I do know there are 74 million people who support an outright criminal and total degenerate as POTUS. Which means there are 74 million Americans I. want. nothing. to. do. with.”

Others saw it another way, including @SheepDogSociety, “Well, now we know that “50% of Americans” are totally brainwashed by the Left. And we all know that number is greatly inflated and their polls are fake!! Thank you @POTUS!!”

On that note, let the healing and unity begin!

How can there be any sort of healing if we continue to see such commentary spread across social media? The answer of course is that we’ll continue to see a divided country with outright contempt for the other half. It also highlights the fact that such polls are there just to throw gasoline on a wild fire, and to elicit such responses.

Mission accomplished.

At least a few took light of the findings of the poll. @AlbyWeiser was among those who suggested, “50% of Americans are just as f***** stupid as the other 50%”

@Crystal_Monroe suggested, “I don’t care how long Twitter makes 50% of Americans trend…. no one believes those fake Polls.”

The Other 50%

Once “50% of Americans” began trending it was of course picked up in ways that had nothing to do with President Trump or the election, but showed the contempt for politicians in general.

Ye4us (@ye4us), which is stated on Twitter to be the “Official Plug Kayne West Presidential Campaign,” may have summed up the situation best, “50% of Americans would be happy to never hear the words democrat or republican ever again”

@ThePoppedArts had a similar sentiment, “50% of Americans hate #congress. The other 50% despise them. #votethemallout #CongressIsAJoke”

And it wasn’t just politics that called out “50%” of the population.

MuslimMarine (@mansoortshams) took time to address another recent survey, “According to PEW over 50% of Americans say they’ve never met a Muslim. That’s crazy! PS: Here are some they should definitely meet. They are serving and protecting America.”

Investment strategist Charles Swope (@PFSinvesments) tweeted, “More than 50% of Americans gave themselves a personal finance grade of A or B in a recent survey. I sure hope you are making the grade, but in the same Equifax survey there were some disturbing facts.”

@qgenics shared news one wants to hear, “Less than 50% of Americans have waist, glucose, and blood pressure levels in the optimal range.”

And perhaps to put everyone in the Christmas spirit there was the tweet from @AdmiralOPG, “50% of Americans agree that It’s A Wonderful Life is a garbage movie and needs to go”

With exception of the actual Pew and Equifax surveys, most of these examples aren’t scientific. We don’t really know if half the country hates It’s A Wonderful Life or if it despises Congress. In the latter case, half the country probably gives the government too little thought.

However, all this shows yet again that more and more of the country are seeing the country and even the world as a glass that isn’t just half empty it is filled with something no one would drink anyway! Until some of the negative rhetoric is brought down we’re likely to stay so deeply divided.

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Social Media Is Dead, Right? Well… – Forbes

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Recently, a friend approached me regarding the future of social media.

She was curious about things like The Social Dilemma, Twitter’s permanent suspension of Trump’s account, and many platforms’ new regulations—and the effect all of this may have on the industry as a whole. It is truly a fantastic question, and as the founder of a social media agency, these are all things that have been top of mind for a long while now.

Here’s how I responded.

Social Media Will Evolve, Not Go Away

Social media is absolutely addictive, and is built to be that way—so that part of The Social Dilemma is true. And this won’t change. Social media will always be addictive, for better or for worse. It is part of human behavior now. Networks will change. They’ll evolve. New ones will emerge. Older ones will die out. But consumer behavior—and the desire to connect and communicate online via networks—is forever here to stay. Users are not leaving social anytime soon. 

I do, however, believe that the recent comeuppance of the false narrative of Trump and his followers has forced the hand of networks to take stronger action to avoid the spread of false information. I strongly believe that this will happen—and it will both be good for the world and affect the stock of some of the networks.

Brands Will Have to Meet People Where They Are

For advertisers, it is imperative to meet people where they are. And if you look at the spends, there is no sign of stopping. The data will tell you this: A third of brands currently spend more on Facebook than any other platform, and 76 percent of brands plan to increase their ad spend in 2021. 44 percent have upped Twitter spending post–Trump removal, and 38 percent have increased on Instagram. If consumers are there, advertisers simply have to be there. 

One interesting observation: In July, there was a Facebook boycott called #StopHateForProfit where brands pulled their advertising from Facebook and demanded the network do more to combat bias, misinformation, harassment, and hate speech on the platform. This initiative was fantastic; however, it did not really hurt Facebook’s bottom line at all—advertisers came right back. Personally, what I found during that time was that advertisers reallocated their dollars. They would ask our team: “Is this the time to try Pinterest advertising? TikTok? What can we do that’s new?” The appetite is not to leave social media; it’s to find an opportunity that meets people where they are in a natural way.

Brands Need to Align with Consumers’ Values

There’s also a deep desire for brands to create content that is good for the world. A recent study from Accenture talked about how consumers want the brands they purchase from to care about the things they care about—including social and environmental issues. In fact, brands that don’t do this could see some big losses! 43 percent of consumers said they will walk away if they’re disappointed by a brands’ words or actions on a social issue—and 21 percent wouldn’t come back. This is new for many brands, and so using social media to lean into the good that they do is transitioning from a “nice-to-do” to a “must-do.”

So, I’m not worried about social media going away. I’m hopeful about it maturing and getting better. I’m not worried about advertisers going away. I’m focused on making sure they know about new networks, and keeping them educated on new platforms and on meeting people where they are. And I’m inspired by the amount of “good content” we will be able to put out into the world. Ultimately, I think that brands will have no choice but to do good—and that’s great.

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Social Media Is Dead, Right? Well… – Forbes

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 on


Recently, a friend approached me regarding the future of social media.

She was curious about things like The Social Dilemma, Twitter’s permanent suspension of Trump’s account, and many platforms’ new regulations—and the effect all of this may have on the industry as a whole. It is truly a fantastic question, and as the founder of a social media agency, these are all things that have been top of mind for a long while now.

Here’s how I responded.

Social Media Will Evolve, Not Go Away

Social media is absolutely addictive, and is built to be that way—so that part of The Social Dilemma is true. And this won’t change. Social media will always be addictive, for better or for worse. It is part of human behavior now. Networks will change. They’ll evolve. New ones will emerge. Older ones will die out. But consumer behavior—and the desire to connect and communicate online via networks—is forever here to stay. Users are not leaving social anytime soon. 

I do, however, believe that the recent comeuppance of the false narrative of Trump and his followers has forced the hand of networks to take stronger action to avoid the spread of false information. I strongly believe that this will happen—and it will both be good for the world and affect the stock of some of the networks.

Brands Will Have to Meet People Where They Are

For advertisers, it is imperative to meet people where they are. And if you look at the spends, there is no sign of stopping. The data will tell you this: A third of brands currently spend more on Facebook than any other platform, and 76 percent of brands plan to increase their ad spend in 2021. 44 percent have upped Twitter spending post–Trump removal, and 38 percent have increased on Instagram. If consumers are there, advertisers simply have to be there. 

One interesting observation: In July, there was a Facebook boycott called #StopHateForProfit where brands pulled their advertising from Facebook and demanded the network do more to combat bias, misinformation, harassment, and hate speech on the platform. This initiative was fantastic; however, it did not really hurt Facebook’s bottom line at all—advertisers came right back. Personally, what I found during that time was that advertisers reallocated their dollars. They would ask our team: “Is this the time to try Pinterest advertising? TikTok? What can we do that’s new?” The appetite is not to leave social media; it’s to find an opportunity that meets people where they are in a natural way.

Brands Need to Align with Consumers’ Values

There’s also a deep desire for brands to create content that is good for the world. A recent study from Accenture talked about how consumers want the brands they purchase from to care about the things they care about—including social and environmental issues. In fact, brands that don’t do this could see some big losses! 43 percent of consumers said they will walk away if they’re disappointed by a brands’ words or actions on a social issue—and 21 percent wouldn’t come back. This is new for many brands, and so using social media to lean into the good that they do is transitioning from a “nice-to-do” to a “must-do.”

So, I’m not worried about social media going away. I’m hopeful about it maturing and getting better. I’m not worried about advertisers going away. I’m focused on making sure they know about new networks, and keeping them educated on new platforms and on meeting people where they are. And I’m inspired by the amount of “good content” we will be able to put out into the world. Ultimately, I think that brands will have no choice but to do good—and that’s great.

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Different types of gambling, media converging for growth – 570 News

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ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — The many different types of gambling are quickly coming together with each other and with media outlets — and Wall Street is taking notice.

Casino gambling, internet gambling, sports betting and daily fantasy sports are no longer separate silos with unique audiences: Gambling companies are increasingly combining them and partnering with media companies to expand the reach of gambling.

This expansion is leading Wall Street analysts to predict fast-growing revenue in the U.S. over the next five to 10 years. Morgan Stanley sees a $15 billion sports betting and internet gambling market by 2025, and Macquarie Research says that same market could be $30 billion by 2030.

“The once disparate categories of online gaming, media and sports are joining teams to create powerful partnerships that we believe will grow viewership, increase overall fan engagement, and drive significantly higher market values for all those connected,” Macquarie wrote in a report issued Tuesday.

It cited numerous examples of deals between sports betting and media companies last year, including Bally’s and Sinclair Broadcasting; Flutter Entertainment and FOX; PointsBet and NBC; William Hill and CBS; DraftKings and Caesars Entertainment partnering with ESPN; Penn National and Barstool Sports; BetMGM and Yahoo; and Turner Sports’ deals with FanDuel and DraftKings.

David Schwartz, a gambling historian with the University of Nevada Las Vegas, said combinations like these “seem to be the wave of the future.”

“With geographic expansion nearly complete in the U.S. — Texas is the biggest unserved market still out there — casino companies are looking to grow their revenues by expanding into new forms of gambling, (and) online and sports betting are the most prominent,” he said. “Even daily fantasy sports is seen as a viable route, as seen by recent moves by Bally’s and Caesars. The media partners get more content and more eyes on their product.”

Bill Miller, president of the American Gaming Association, the gambling industry’s national trade association, said deals like these are “a logical extension” of the industry’s desire to keep pace with customer expectations.

“Responsibly growing these verticals will be essential to the industry’s continued success,” he said.

In a report last week, Morgan Stanley forecast a $15 billion market for sports betting and internet gambling by 2025, an increase of 27% over current levels. As much as $10 billion of that is likely to come from sports betting, the company said.

Most analysts expect at least half the country will have legal sports betting by the end of 2021, with continued expansion after that.

Morgan Stanley said sports betting and internet gambling revenue reached $3.1 billion in the U.S. last year, well outpacing its forecast of $2 billion. While some of the growth in online wagering was undoubtedly helped by months of casino closures during the coronavirus pandemic, Morgan Stanley says there’s a durable market taking shape in these industries.

“We see legalized U.S. sports betting and iGaming as a once-in-a-generation shift for what was a mature gaming industry,” Morgan Stanley wrote. “It is clear to us that Americans’ interest in sports and gambling should lead to higher revenue (per) adult than we previously expected.”

___

Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAC.

Wayne Parry, The Associated Press

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