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7 Montrealers you need to follow on social media

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Here are some of the most in-touch, thoughtful and downright cool Montrealers you should be following on social media.

Former Bachelor star Vanessa Grimaldi is best known around Montreal for her contributions to special education programs across the city.

We’re living through generation social media — there’s no way around it, and while the benefits and pitfalls that come along with social media are constantly being debated, being mindful about who you choose to follow is one of the simplest ways to ensure you’re getting the most out of the platform.

Looking to freshen up your feed with a new curation of Montreal-based YouTubers and Instagrammers? Here are some of the most in-touch, thoughtful and downright cool Montrealers you should be following on social media. From high-end fashion influencers to uplifting and inspiring personalities, these local social media stars are sure to breathe some fresh air into your feed.

Vanessa Grimaldi

@vanessagrimaldi30

Former Bachelor star Vanessa Grimaldi is best known around Montreal for her contributions to special education programs across the city. As the founder of No Better You, an organization that provides the necessary tools to help give students in the special needs community a voice, Grimaldi’s personal Instagram offers an insider’s glimpse into the happenings around the city with a distinctly positive and uplifting lens.

Nalie Agustin

@nalieagustin

Documenting her life online since 2013 when she was received a cancer diagnosis in her early 20s, speaker and wellness advocate Nalie Agustin offers an unfiltered look into what it really means to be a cancer thriver and twentysomething in Montreal. Whether it’s a glamorous speaking event abroad or a visit to the doctor’s office, Agustin’s refreshing honesty and positive approach to life will inspire you to live every day with gratitude — no matter what the universe may throw your way.

Audrey Rivet

@audreyrivet

While Instagram is increasingly becoming a spot to share longer, more meaningful blog-style captions rather than just esthetically pleasing images, Audrey Rivet seamlessly integrates the two. Her “beige-tinted” Instagram feed is a visual feast of destinations in and around Montreal while her honest captions and stories — including topics surrounding mental health, body image and social justice issues — provide a welcome dose of depth and realness.

Josiane Konaté

@petiteandbold

A self-proclaimed “skin care enthusiast and visual storyteller,” Josiane Konaté is the founder of Maison Petite & Bold, a curated online marketplace that offers head wraps, home decor and various other lifestyle items made in West Africa. Aside from her role as owner and curator at Maison Petite & Bold, Konaté’s colourful and bilingual feed is full of timeless fashion inspiration, parenting realness and happenings around the city.

Tiffany Lai

@lai_tiffany

At first glance, Tiffany Lai’s Instagram feed appears to be an artfully arranged curation of interior decor, fashion and travel highlights — but look beyond the esthetics and you’ll quickly find the YouTuber and Instagrammer’s musings centre just as much on mental health, self-care and educating her followers on what it means to be anti-racist (particularly when it comes to promoting awareness around cultural appropriation in the restaurant industry).

Grece Ghanem

@greceghanem

Born and raised in Lebanon, Grece Ghanem has lived many lives, to say the least. The microbiologist-turned-personal trainer and Instagram style icon has been profiled everywhere from Vogue to Harper’s Bazaar — and for good reason. The fiftysomething content creator is redefining what it means to be a style icon in the digital age by way of an artful blend of enviable style, joie de vivre and self-confidence.

Katie DiCaprio

@mtlkatie

Katie DiCaprio is a marketer, podcast host and entrepreneur with a penchant for keeping it real on Instagram. Known as @mtlkatie on social media, DiCaprio has garnered attention for her unfiltered take on the greater influencer and marketing world; specifically for her ability to pull back the veil on little-known industry terms, feed esthetics and strategies that the average social media user should be aware of when they’re considering who to follow and what content to consume.

Source: – County Weekly News

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Global Environment Media (GEM) Announces the First-of-its-Kind Digital Media Network Dedicated to Positive Environmental Solutions – Canada NewsWire

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MONACO and WASHINGTON, Oct. 23, 2020 /CNW/ — Nonprofit, civic and corporate leaders from around the world have come together to launch Global Environment Media (GEM), a content platform designed to educate, engage, and empower audiences to tell positive stories of progress about our planet. The announcement was made today by its distinguished co-founders surrounding the 75th anniversary of the United Nations. Press kit and Sizzle Video.

Seeing the need for positive solutions that address the current environmental crises, this founding team of Christian Moore, Vincent Roger, Dennis Kucinich, Michael Clemente, Elizabeth Kucinich, Marc Scarpa and Doug Scott joined forces to build a media company with the support of the non-profit organization, GEMA, that together will lead current and future generations to a healthier, more sustainable planet. The founders share a vision to curate, produce and distribute inspiring environmental stories with positive solutions.

Moore, the Managing Partner of GEM and president of the foundation, Global Environment Movement Association (GEMA) said, “GEM embodies that mindset that people must fall in love with the natural world first in order to then be engaged and excited enough to save it. This was why we launched GEM as the first-of-its kind media network.”

Added Roger, the Managing Partner GEM, and treasurer of GEMA, “We believe in positivity and wanted to create a destination where people can explore stories of innovators who are impacting the world. We know that governments can only go so far and together with GEM, individuals, businesses and NGOs, can take action and catalyze the change needed to heal our planet.”

GEM-TV.com will be divided into four primary sections: 1) Live TV, 2)Topics – an expansive VOD library – “solution-oriented” videos covering nine environmental topics: Energy, Climate Change, People on Earth, Forests, The Ocean, Biodiversity, Food, Sustainable Living and Water 3) Research – an education section rich with infographics, academic papers, a portal to global environmental courses and 4) Kids – a special learning section for kids.

With its powerful mission, GEM has already partnered with 50 institutions, foundations, NGOs, and nearly 40 global advisory members. To read the full list go here.

GEM is proud to have the support of Hamid Guedroudj, social and environmental philanthropist.

For more information, please visit Gem-TV.com.

Follow on Social: @TheGEMPlatform

Logo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1319153/GEM_TV_Logo.jpg

Media Contacts
Liz Stein, Communications Director
[email protected]

SOURCE Global Environment Media

For further information: +1.240.461.3053, https://gem-tv.com/

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Nunavut MLA ousted from cabinet after social media post criticizing Black women for abortions – CBC.ca

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Nunavut MLA Patterk Netser has been removed from cabinet after a 14-3 vote by his fellow MLAs in the legislature on Friday morning.

“I sometimes have to make difficult decisions in the best interest of our territory. This is one of those times. There can be no tolerance for disrespectful hurtful actions,” said Premier Joe Savikataaq. 

Savikataaq introduced a motion on Wednesday — the first day of the fall sitting — to remove Netser from the executive council. Savikataaq accused Netser of making comments “based in racism and gender violence.”

Netser’s demotion follows a recent Facebook post in which the MLA criticized Black women for having abortions. In the same post, Netser also stated “all lives matter,” a phrase largely seen as a criticism of the Black Lives Matter movement because it discounts the disproportionate racism that Black people face.

A post apparently made by Netser refers to “all lives matter,” a slogan which undermines the Black Lives Matter message by discounting the disproportionate racism that Black people face. His post then goes on to question how many Black women undergo abortion. (Patiq Netser/Facebook)

Two weeks ago, the premier stripped Netser of his ministerial portfolios. The Aivilik MLA was minister responsible for the Nunavut Housing Corporation and the Nunavut Arctic College.

In a statement on Friday morning in the legislature, Netser denied the premier’s claim that his words were racist or gender violent. 

“I never raised any issues on ethnic groups. I spoke out about unborn babies that have been aborted,” he said, in his response to the motion.

“My reference to ‘all lives matter’ was not stated in that context and I would not have used those words if I knew they could be used to negate the struggles of my Black brothers and sisters,” he said.  

‘We cannot say whatever we want’

Iqaluit Manirajak MLA Adam Arreak Lightstone seconded the motion to oust Netser. 

MLAs Tony Akoak, Emiliano Qirngnuq and Netser opposed. MLA David Qamaniq abstained from voting while three others, Minister Elisapee Sheutiapik, MLAs Cathy Towtongie and Margaret Nakashuk were not present in the house for the vote.

Qirngnuq said he was uncomfortable with the motion because the statements by Netser were made outside of the assembly. He asked for deep reflection on the severity of government reaction. 

Jeannie Ehaloak, minister of Justice and responsible for Human Rights Tribunal, supported the vote to oust Netser from cabinet.

Justice minister Jeannie Ehaloak says saying ‘whatever we want to’ puts the credibility of government at risk. (Jordan Konek/CBC)

“We can believe whatever we want to. But we cannot say whatever we want when those statements have a negative impact on the rights and dignity of others,” Ehaloak said.

“This is particularly true for those of us in office.”

Doing so puts the credibility of government at risk, she added.

“We have a code of conduct, when you’re elected to MLA you are held to a higher standard than the general public. When you’re elected to the executive council you are held to an even higher level, you are speaking on behalf of the government,” premier Savikataaq said to media following the vote. 

Savikataaq said Wednesday that he expected MLAs to support his motion to take the next step and remove Netser from cabinet. The premier wanted MLAs to vote on his motion on Wednesday, but Netser voted to delay it until Friday.

The ousted minister also spoke out on Wednesday, making no apologies for his social media posts. In a member’s statement, he said he was being punished “because of my Christian principles and values.”

Now out of cabinet, Netser told reporters on Friday that he will continue as an MLA.

To his constituents he said, “This is what happened, we can’t do anything about it, we will be OK.”  

 The cabinet vacancy has triggered a leadership forum to be held to elect another MLA to fill the spot. The date for the forum has yet to be determined.   

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To Recognize Misinformation in Media, Teach a Generation While It’s Young – The New York Times

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The Instagram post looked strange to Amulya Panakam, a 16-year-old high school student who lives near Atlanta. In February, a friend showed her a sensational headline on her phone that declared,Kim Jong Un is personally killing soldiers who have Covid-19!” Of course, the news wasn’t real. “I was immediately suspicious,” Ms. Panakam said. She searched online and found no media outlets reporting the fake story. But her friends had already shared it on social media.

Ms. Panakam was startled by how often students “grossly handle and spread misinformation without knowing it,” she said. Yet media literacy is not part of her school’s curriculum.

So Ms. Panakam ­­contacted Media Literacy Now, a nonprofit organization based near Boston that works to spread media literacy education. With its help, she wrote to her state and local representatives to discuss introducing media literacy in schools.

The subject was hardly new. Well before the internet, many scholars analyzed media influence on society. In recent decades, colleges have offered media studies to examine advertising, propaganda, biases, how people are portrayed in films and more.

But in a digital age, media literacy also includes understanding how websites profit from fictional news, how algorithms and bots work, and how to scrutinize suspicious websites that mimic real news outlets.

Now, during the global Covid-19 crisis, identifying reliable health information can be a matter of life or death. And as racial tensions run high in America, hostile actors can harness social media to sow discord and spread disinformation and false voting information, as they did in the 2016 elections and may well be repeating in the current elections.

Indeed, Facebook and Twitter recently shut down fake accounts linked to the Internet Research Agency, backed by Russia. Twitter said this month that it suspended nearly 1,600 accounts, including some in Iran that “amplified conversations on politically sensitive topics” like race and social justice.

Online misinformation might seem like an incurable virus, but social media companies, policymakers and nonprofits are beginning to address the problem more directly. In March, big internet companies like Facebook and Twitter started removing misleading Covid-19 posts. And many policymakers are pushing for tighter regulations about harmful content.

What still needs more attention, however, is more and earlier education. Teaching media literacy skills to teenagers and younger students can protect readers and listeners from misinformation, just as teaching good hygiene reduces disease.

A RAND report last year said research showed signs that media literacy increases “resiliency to disinformation.”

Erin McNeill, the founder of Media Literacy Now, grew concerned when her young sons were exposed to sexist female stereotypes on television and in video games. She raised the issue to her son’s fifth grade teacher, who voluntarily created a media literacy unit that included analyzing those messages.

Going further, she said, “we need policy so it’s embedded in the education system,” and in 2011 she wrote to Massachusetts politicians and eventually got support from some, notably a state senator, Katherine Clark, who is now a representative in Congress.

Two years later Ms. McNeill founded Media Literacy Now, to help people in other states lobby policymakers. The organization’s online tool kit included templates for emailing to elected officials, alongside samples of policy documents, research papers and videos. Changes were already happening before Media Literacy Now was founded. Since 2008, 14 states have passed legislation supporting some form of media literacy in schools, potentially affecting tens of millions of students.

And media literacy is getting more support. Last year, Senator Amy Klobuchar, Democrat of Minnesota, introduced a bill calling for $20 million to fund media literacy education.

While that federal bill has little chance of passing, momentum has grown at the state level, and 15 states were considering media literacy bills this year. Media Literacy Now has influenced nearly 30 bills in 18 states since its founding.

In Connecticut, for example, it guided a group of African-American social workers who had founded a company named Welcome 2 Reality to seek new state laws that passed in 2015 and 2017. The state now requires schools to teach safe use of social media and also formed an advisory council on media literacy education that is drafting a baseline report.

Marcus Stallworth, a founder of the social workers’ group who has taught an elective titled “Social Media: The Good, Bad, and the Ugly” at the University of Bridgeport, saw how deeply media affected students. “Social media — anyone can say anything,” he tells them. He also asks them to consider who is disseminating information and what their intent might be. For example, are posts coming from an official source like the governor, or from a potential scammer?

After connecting with Media Literacy Now, the social workers realized that state education policies could have wider impact. Qur-an Webb, a member of Welcome 2 Reality who saw that ordinary citizens could influence lawmakers, concluded that “these are people we vote for — they should meet with us.”

There is no silver bullet for disarming misinformation. But states’ media literacy education policies typically include first steps, like creating expert committees to advise education departments or develop media literacy standards. Next come recommending curriculums, training educators, funding school media centers and specialists, monitoring and evaluation.

States set guidelines for education departments, although local districts often have final control of curriculums.

Even without legislation, teachers can incorporate media literacy concepts into existing classes or offer electives. At Andover High School in Massachusetts, Mary Robb has taught the subject for 19 years. As part of Media Literacy Now’s advocacy, she and her students testified at a Massachusetts State House hearing in 2013.

Ms. Robb now includes media literacy in civics classes, where students might analyze war propaganda and assess the credibility of websites. “‘Fake news’ is not news that you disagree with,” she emphasized.

At Swampscott High School in Massachusetts, Tom Reid has taught media literacy for 15 years and testified at the State House. He pointed out that lessons should focus on critical thinking, rather than being “too focused on simply trying to get students to reduce their screen time.”

Teaching resources already exist. News Literacy Project, for example, has a free 13-lesson online curriculum. Its lessons also cover topics like “deep fake” videos and the role of journalism in a democracy.

Other resources include Ground News, which compares reportage; Adfontes Media, which assesses the reliability of news sources; and Media Education Foundation, which makes documentaries about media’s impact.

Establishing policies is one important step, but Media Literacy Now does not track how they are carried out. “Just passing one bill does not necessarily mean the lessons are being taught,” Ms. McNeill said. “Advocacy still needs to be done.”

Many young people say media literacy is invaluable. Mr. Stallworth’s students said they wished they had learned about the subject earlier.

“Why are we waiting until they get to college?” Mr. Stallworth asked. “It makes more sense to introduce them much earlier.”

Ms. Yee is a journalist who has written about solutions to social problems in the United States, Africa, Asia, Australia and Europe.

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