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A Florida woman was attacked by a 10-foot alligator while trimming trees – CNN

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The 27-year-old woman was trimming by the edge of a lake near a country club in Fort Myers on September 10 when the alligator bit her.
She was taken to Lee Memorial Hospital and treated for injuries to both legs, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC).
The alligator was later caught by a contracted nuisance alligator trapper and taken to an alligator farm, according to the commission
The FWC said it is are still investigating the incident.
A few days later on September 13, a man suffered injuries to his leg when he was bitten by an alligator while walking his dog along a residential canal in Port St. Lucie, FWC said. The 8-foot, 3-inch alligator that bit him was removed and transferred to an alligator farm.
CNN affiliate WPTV reported that Mark Johnson, 61, said the alligator clamped onto his leg and was trying to drag him under water. When Johnson poked the alligator in the eye, the reptile let go, he said.
“I kind of slide and my foot is stuck in the mud, and the next thing I know, I see the lunge,” Johnson told WPTV. “He starts clamping down pretty tight and he started to pull, and the next thing I do, I instantly, here’s my fingers, I poke through the eye.”
Johnson received 62 stitches and his dog was unhurt, WPTV reported.
Alligator bites are serious, but injuries caused by the massive reptiles are rare in Florida, according to the FWC.
“FWC places the highest priority on public safety and administers a Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program (SNAP),” FWC said in a statement to CNN. “The goal of SNAP is to proactively address alligator threats in developed areas, while conserving alligators in areas where they naturally occur.”
SNAP uses contracted nuisance alligator trappers across Florida to find and remove alligators who may pose a threat to people or pets.

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B.C. Halloween forecast: Frightfully chilly under a spooky full moon – Vancouver Sun

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Article content

While the weather is expected to be frightfully cold in much of B.C. this Halloween, those who venture outdoors may be in for a treat.

A rare full “blue” moon is expected Saturday night, the second full moon this month.

The last time trick-or-treaters went out under a full moon in B.C. was in 2001, but the last Halloween full moon in all time zones was in 1944, according to the Farmer’s Almanac.

© Gideon Knight_Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Young Grand title young winner Featuring: The moon and the crow. Photo by CB2/ZOB /Gideon Knight/Wildlife Photograp

As for the weather, if you’re in Metro Vancouver it’s likely going to be clear and sunny during the day with a high of 11 C, and then partly cloudy at night with a low of 5 C, according to Environment and Climate Change Canada.

Elsewhere in B.C., the Prince George and Williams Lake areas should see a mix of sun and cloud with a high of around 4 or 5 C and an overnight low of 2 C, while in the Okanagan it will likely be overcast and 10 C, dipping down to 4 C overnight with a slight chance of showers.

In the northern region of Dease Lake, the forecast looks for sunny during the day and freezing at night, plunging to minus 7 C overnight.

In the central B.C. region, some communities may have snow Saturday. The agency is forecasting a good chance of flurries in Smithers during the day but showers overnight.

ticrawford@postmedia.com

More to come …

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Elusive and extremely rare catshark captured in amazing video – CNET

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This short-tail catshark (Parmaturus bigus), seen at the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia, is a rare sight.


Schmidt Ocean video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

Great whites might be the jumbo stars of the shark world, but there are some equally fascinating members on the other side of the size spectrum. The crew of the research vessel Falkor experienced the wonders of the deep when it spotted “one of the rarest species of sharks in the world” during a recent Schmidt Ocean Institute mission.

Shark expert Will White with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia’s national science research agency, identified the short-tail catshark Parmaturus bigus from footage captured during an exploration of the Great Barrier Reef on Oct. 17. Falkor’s remotely operated submersible SuBastian got a good look at the big-eyed creature. 

Though you can chill out and enjoy the hours of underwater footage and scientific commentary, the shark appears a little over two hours into this video. “It’s a shark!” the scientists comment as they zoom in.

Researchers have collected only one specimen of Parmaturus bigus, which is held in the Australian National Fish Collection. The one spotted lounging on the sand was a male estimated to be around 20 inches (50 cm) long. The remotely operated vehicle was able to follow it as it swam off.

Even better, the ocean researchers discovered they had filmed another specimen during a dive back in May but hadn’t identified it at the time. The team also found footage of an egg case from the short-tail catshark, giving scientists a wealth of new information about the species and its habitat.

“Through the efforts of the Falkor team, we now have three more records of one of the world’s rarest sharks,” Schmidt Ocean said in a statement Monday, including “the first footage of a living specimen.”

Schmidt Ocean expeditions have gifted us some extraordinary views of the marvels of the deep in recent years, from a stunningly bizarre siphonophore to a wild “benthic tornado.” The catshark fits in beautifully with this impressive track record of discovery.

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'One of the rarest species of shark in the world' captured in amazing video – CNET

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 on


This short-tail catshark (Parmaturus bigus), seen at the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia, is a rare sight.


Schmidt Ocean video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

Great whites might be the jumbo stars of the shark world, but there are some equally fascinating members on the other side of the size spectrum. The crew of the research vessel Falkor experienced the wonders of the deep when it spotted “one of the rarest species of sharks in the world” during a recent Schmidt Ocean Institute mission.

Shark expert Will White with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia’s national science research agency, identified the short-tail catshark Parmaturus bigus from footage captured during an exploration of the Great Barrier Reef on Oct. 17. Falkor’s remotely operated submersible SuBastian got a good look at the big-eyed creature. 

Though you can chill out and enjoy the hours of underwater footage and scientific commentary, the shark appears a little over two hours into this video. “It’s a shark!” the scientists comment as they zoom in.

Researchers have collected only one specimen of Parmaturus bigus, which is held in the Australian National Fish Collection. The one spotted lounging on the sand was a male estimated to be around 20 inches (50 cm) long. The remotely operated vehicle was able to follow it as it swam off.

Even better, the ocean researchers discovered they had filmed another specimen during a dive back in May but hadn’t identified it at the time. The team also found footage of an egg case from the short-tail catshark, giving scientists a wealth of new information about the species and its habitat.

“Through the efforts of the Falkor team, we now have three more records of one of the world’s rarest sharks,” Schmidt Ocean said in a statement Monday, including “the first footage of a living specimen.”

Schmidt Ocean expeditions have gifted us some extraordinary views of the marvels of the deep in recent years, from a stunningly bizarre siphonophore to a wild “benthic tornado.” The catshark fits in beautifully with this impressive track record of discovery.

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