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A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Friday, Feb. 12, 2021 – Weyburn Review

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The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 10:30 p.m. ET on Friday, Feb. 12, 2021.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 35,449 new vaccinations administered for a total of 1,221,539 doses given. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 3,223.12 per 100,000.

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There were 3,510 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 1,313,225 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 93.02 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Please note that Newfoundland, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.

Newfoundland is reporting 2,091 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 14,687 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 28.048 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland for a total of 19,975 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.8 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 73.53 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 802 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 9,139 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 57.612 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 10,200 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 6.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 89.6 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 5,048 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 22,343 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 22.895 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 34,800 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.6 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 64.2 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 1,366 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 18,643 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 23.90 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 25,850 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 72.12 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 8,280 new vaccinations administered for a total of 280,612 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 32.795 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 310,425 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.6 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 90.4 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 15,605 new vaccinations administered for a total of 442,441 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 30.12 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 437,975 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.0 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 101 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting 1,408 new vaccinations administered for a total of 52,664 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 38.245 per 1,000. There were 3,510 new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 69,600 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 5.1 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 75.67 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 525 new vaccinations administered for a total of 46,788 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 39.679 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 44,575 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.8 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 105 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 4,814 new vaccinations administered for a total of 140,389 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 31.892 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 132,475 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.0 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 106 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting 3,095 new vaccinations administered for a total of 162,982 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 31.761 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 186,550 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.6 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 87.37 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting 80 new vaccinations administered for a total of 11,514 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 275.91 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 14,400 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 35 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 79.96 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 13,132 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 291.053 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 14,400 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 32 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 91.19 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting 20 new vaccinations administered for a total of 6,205 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 160.228 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 12,000 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 31 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 51.71 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions. In some cases the number of doses administered may appear to exceed the number of doses distributed as some provinces have been drawing extra doses per vial.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published Feb. 12, 2021.

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Newfoundland and Labrador reports four new COVID-19 cases, first hospital outbreak – Bowen Island Undercurrent

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ST. JOHN’S, N.L. — Newfoundland and Labrador health authorities reported four new cases of COVID-19 Friday, as well as the first outbreak at a hospital in the province since the start of the pandemic.

Officials said there were 287 active reported COVID-19 infections in the province, and all but five were in the eastern health region, where authorities have been battling an outbreak in the St. John’s area. The outbreak was caused by the B.1.1.7 COVID-19 variant, which was first detected in the United Kingdom.

The Health Department said 11 people were in hospital because of COVID-19 and six more admitted for other reasons had tested positive for the disease. Five COVID-19 patients are in intensive care.

“It’s concerning,” chief medical officer of health Dr. Janice Fitzgerald told reporters Friday. “There have been reports that this variant can cause more severe disease and looking at our hospitalizations and ICU admissions, we are seeing them a little earlier than expected.”

Earlier Friday, the regional health authority’s chief executive officer said his team was battling an outbreak in a surgical unit at St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital in St. John’s. David Diamond would not provide exact numbers but said fewer than 10 people were affected by the outbreak. All of the hospital’s staff and patients were being tested for COVID-19, he added.

The entire province has been in lockdown since Feb. 12, when officials first announced the St. John’s outbreak was fuelled by the B.1.1.7 mutation. 

The outbreak hasn’t spread beyond the eastern region of Newfoundland and Labrador and Fitzgerald on Friday said the rest of the province outside the Avalon Peninsula could move to a lower pandemic-alert level. She said people outside the peninsula could expand their close contacts, adding that “Bubbles need to remain small, exclusive and you should only include other people if it is necessary to keep you and them safe and healthy.”

The Avalon region, including St. John’s, will remain under lockdown for at least the next two weeks, Fitzgerald said.

Like the rest of Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador has experienced shipment delays of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, but Fitzgerald said those hiccups are likely over. Accordingly, she revealed the second and third phase of the province’s vaccination plan on Friday. 

“If our supply remains as it is, I think, the outlook is good that we’ll be able to start Phase 2 in April,” she said.

The second phase of the plan prioritizes adults over 60 years old, beginning with those over 80, as well as Indigenous adults, first responders, rotational workers and adults in marginalized populations, such as those experiencing homelessness, Fitzgerald said. 

Adults between 16 and 59 years old will be vaccinated in the third phase of the rollout, which is expected to begin this summer, Fitzgerald said. “Every Newfoundlander and Labradorian who can get vaccinated should get vaccinated,” she said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 26, 2021.

Sarah Smellie, The Canadian Press

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What are the differences between Canada’s approved COVID-19 vaccines? Here’s what we know – Global News

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Now that the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine has been approved for use in Canada, three different jabs are on the menu for Canadians hoping to protect themselves against the coronavirus.

However, while all the vaccines have the same goal — to inoculate the recipient against COVID-19 — the vaccines are by no means identical.

Read more:
Canada approves AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine

And while Canada’s contracts secure enough doses from the three manufacturers to vaccinate everyone in the country by September, not everyone will be getting the same kind of jab.

Global News has broken down the key details of the three vaccines to help you understand which dose is going into your arm.

What kinds of COVID-19 vaccines are available?

  • Pfizer: mRNA
  • Moderna: mRNA
  • AstraZeneca: adenovirus-based

All of these vaccines use fairly new vaccine technologies, but they don’t all use the same kind.

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Pfizer and Moderna’s vaccines use mRNA technology, which delivers genetic instructions for our cells to make viral proteins themselves. The body then begins to train itself to fight these proteins, building its immunity to the same protein found in COVID-19.


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The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine works differently. It was built using a kind of virus called an adenovirus, which causes colds in chimpanzees. These adenovirus-based vaccines represent a newly approved method of vaccination that has been studied for decades. The adenovirus is altered to carry a gene for the coronavirus protein, which can then train a person’s immune system to recognize the actual coronavirus if it ever enters the body.

How effective are the COVID-19 vaccines?

  • Pfizer: 95 per cent
  • Moderna: 94.1 per cent
  • AstraZeneca: 62 per cent

Each of the vaccines has been found to be effective in combatting the coronavirus. However, they don’t all offer the same amount of protection.

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Pfizer and Moderna have a photo-finish for first place in terms of effectiveness. Clinical trials found Pfizer’s vaccine was 95 per cent effective, while Moderna’s vaccine nipped at Pfizer’s heels with an effectiveness of 94.1 per cent.

The distant bronze goes to the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, which was found to be 62 per cent effective in a two-dose clinical trial.


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However, researchers accidentally gave a sub-group of participants a half-dose on their first jab of the Oxford-AstraZeneca jab, followed up by a full second dose. This group saw a leap in the vaccine’s ability to shield them from the virus, with the outcome proving to be 90 per cent effective.

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Because this was just a sub-group within the clinical trial, the vaccine was only approved for use in its full, two-dose iteration — which is over 30 per cent less effective than Pfizer and Moderna’s vaccines.

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Still, at the end of the day, Canadians should feel confident that any one of the three approved vaccines will cut off COVID-19’s claws and protect them from the worst outcomes of the virus.

“If there is a vaccine and it’s been authorized by Health Canada, it means that it’s met standards,” said Dr. Supriya Sharma, chief medical advisor with the regulatory branch of Health Canada, said on Friday.

She explained that in clinical trials, all the vaccines were found to quash the worst outcomes in coronavirus patients.

“The number of cases of people that died from COVID-19 that got vaccine was zero. The number of people that were hospitalized because their COVID-19 disease was so severe was zero. The number of people that died because of an adverse event or an effect of the vaccine was zero,” Sharma said.

“So in the areas where we’re really looking to prevent serious illness, prevent hospitalizations and of course prevent death, all of these vaccines are good.”

How are the COVID-19 vaccines stored?

  • Pfizer: -70°C
  • Moderna: -25°C to -15°C
  • AstraZeneca: 2°C to 8°C

Just like people, some of these vaccines are pickier than others about the temperature they like to hang around in.

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Of the three vaccines, Pfizer is the most particular — and it likes things chilly. This vaccine requires ultra-cold storage, meaning it has to be transported and stored at -70 C. This makes the vaccine tricky to ship to remote regions, where the appropriate infrastructure is far more difficult to set up.


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Enter the Moderna vaccine, which is a little less discerning. While this vaccine still likes the cold, it isn’t quite as particular as the Pfizer jab. The Moderna doses can be stored in a freezer between -25 C and -15 C. That’s why the territories have been guaranteed priority access to this particular vaccine, as it’s much easier to safely transport and store.

This category is also where AstraZeneca’s vaccine truly shines. The doses can be stored at normal fridge temperature — meaning the doses are much easier to both ship and keep.

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How many doses of each COVID-19 vaccine are required?

  • Pfizer: two
  • Moderna: two
  • AstraZeneca: two

Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca’s vaccines are all two-dose shots — leaving little room for relief for those Canadians who get sweaty palms at the very thought of needles.

Some, including the head of Ontario’s vaccine rollout Gen. Rick Hillier, have pushed for Moderna to be approved as a single-dose vaccine, as the jab has proven to be about 80 per cent effective after the first injection.

However, no clinical trials have been conducted to prove whether that inoculation lasts long-term — and Moderna hasn’t shown any interest in conducting further trials to determine if less effective, one-time vaccine is a safe and effective option.

Who can take the COVID-19 vaccine?

  • Pfizer: 16+
  • Moderna: 18+
  • AstraZeneca: 18+

While Canada is on track to have tens of millions of doses available to Canadians this year, not everyone who may want the vaccine will be able to take it.

Pfizer’s clinical trials were only conducted on those over the age of 16, which means that until further studies are completed in younger age groups, anyone under 16 years old is ineligible for the jab. The same issue comes into play for both Moderna and AstraZeneca, which only conducted their clinical trials on Canadians over the age of 18.

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When will kids be able to get the COVID-19 vaccine? Experts weigh in – Jan 26, 2021

Moderna is currently conducting additional studies in children over 12 years old, so teens may be able to access the jabs once that work is done.

However, age isn’t the only limitation those hoping to be vaccinated may face. Anyone who is allergic to the ingredients in the vaccines is not allowed to receive the injections, and pregnant or breastfeeding mothers have been asked to consult their doctors before moving ahead with their vaccinations.

Finally, if you have COVID-19, you can’t get the vaccine until you’re better.

How many doses is Canada getting?

  • Pfizer: 40 million doses
  • Moderna: 40 million doses
  • AstraZeneca: 20 million doses

Out of the three approved vaccines, individual Canadians are most likely to wind up receiving the Moderna vaccine. Canada’s agreement with Moderna is for 40 million doses — although the feds have the option of purchasing another 16 million in addition to that. The 40 million doses are enough to inoculate 20 million Canadians, over half of the population.

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Meanwhile, Canada has 40 million Pfizer doses secured in its agreement with the manufacturer. That’s enough to inoculate another 20 million Canadians, which means that between Pfizer and Moderna alone, Canada has enough doses to vaccine every Canadian and then some.


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As for the agreement with AstraZeneca, Canada has purchased 20 million doses — enough to vaccine another 10 million Canadians. That means that between the three agreements, Canada has enough doses to inoculate 40 million people, which is more than the entire population, within the year.

Should Canada opt to purchase more of any of the vaccines, there’s no guarantee they’d arrive any faster than the initial 80 million doses. Any additional doses would be entirely dependent on the manufacturer’s production capacity, which is under serious strain as every country battles to get the vaccines.

Either way, Canada’s current vaccine agreements point in an optimistic direction: every Canadian who wants a vaccine should be able to access one in 2021.

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© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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COVID-19 Ontario: Province logs more than 1,200 new cases, 28 deaths – CTV Toronto

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TORONTO —
Ontario is recording more than 1,200 new COVID-19 infections, marking the fourth straight day of case counts increasing.

On Friday, provincial health officials logged 1,258 infections of the novel coronavirus, as well as 28 more deaths linked to the disease.

Before that, the province recorded 1,138 new cases on Thursday, 1,054 on Wednesday and 975 on Tuesday.

Daily case counts have hovered slightly above or below the 1,000 mark for much of the past few weeks.

The province’s seven-day average for number of cases recorded is now 1,114, down from 1,206 one week ago.

Of the new cases logged Friday, 362 are in Toronto, 274 are in Peel Region and 104 are in York Region.

York Region moved back into Ontario’s colour-coded reopening framework on Monday, allowing gyms and restaurants to reopen with strict public health measures in place.

Toronto and Peel Region remain under a stay-at-home order until at least March 8.

There were 64,049 COVID-19 tests completed in Ontario in the last-recorded 24-hour period. The test positivity rate now stands at about 2.3 per cent, according to the Ministry of Health.

Friday’s count brings the total number of lab-confirmed cases in Ontario 298,569, including deaths and recoveries.

With the 28 new deaths confirmed by health officials on Friday, the province’s death toll is now 6,944. None of the new deaths included residents of the province’s long-term care system.

According to the province, there are at least 683 patients infected with the novel coronavirus in Ontario hospitals as of Friday. Of those patients, 284 are in the intensive care unit (ICU) and 193 of those 284 patients are breathing with the assistance of a ventilator.

At this time last week, there were 689 hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Ontario, 269 of which were in the ICU and 190 were on a ventilator.

On Friday, health officials deemed 1,007 more cases of the disease to be resolved, bringing Ontario’s number of recovered patients up to 281,331.

There are currently 10,294 active cases of COVID-19 in Ontario, down from 10,550 one week ago.

Variants of concern in Ontario

Health officials confirmed Friday that 28 more cases of the U.K. variant, also known as B.1.1.7, have been found in Ontario, bringing the province’s total count to 477.

There is now a total of 14 confirmed cases of the South African variant, known as B.1.351, in Ontario after three new cases were logged by officials on Friday.

No new cases of the Brazilian variant, known as P.1, were recorded Friday, keeping the province’s total infection count at two.

Modelling data released by the province on Thursday suggested that the highly-contagious COVID-19 variants are expected to make up about 40 per cent of all Ontario cases by the second week of March, leading to a likely increase in daily infections and hospitalizations.

Vaccinations across the province

Meanwhile, 643,765 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Ontario thus far, including 21,805 administered in the previous day. The vaccine requires two doses. In Ontario, 258,014 total vaccinations have been completed as of Friday.

Backstory:

NOTE: The numbers used in this story are found in the Ontario Ministry of Health’s COVID-19 Daily Epidemiologic Summary. The number of cases for any city or region may differ slightly from what is reported by the province, because local units report figures at different times.

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