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A massive repudiation of Trump’s racist politics is building – The Washington Post

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Those words seem prescient today, after four years of President Trump’s racism, from the “very fine people” marching with neo-Nazis in Charlottesville to, in just the past week, a “white power” retweet and a threat to veto defense spending to protect the names of Confederate generals; after a pandemic disproportionately ravaged African American communities while an indifferent president tried to move on; after Trump-allied demonstrators, some carrying firearms and Confederate flags, tried to “liberate” themselves from public health restrictions; after the video of George Floyd’s killing showed the world blatant police brutality; after Trump used federal firepower against peaceful civil rights demonstrators of all colors.

The reckoning Parker foresaw is now upon us. White women, disgusted by Trump’s cruelty, are abandoning him in large number. White liberals, stunned by the brazen racism, have taken to the streets. And signs point to African American turnout in November that will rival the record level of 2012, when Obama was on the ballot. This, by itself, would flip Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin to Democrats, an analysis by the liberal Center for American Progress shows.

Surprisingly high Democratic turnout in recent contests in Wisconsin, Georgia, Kentucky and Colorado points to the possibility of a building wave. The various measures of Democratic enthusiasm suggest “turnout beyond anything we’ve seen since 1960,” University of North Carolina political scientist Marc Hetherington predicts. If so, that would mean a historic repudiation of Trump, who knows his hope of reelection depends on low turnout. He has warned that mail-in ballots and other attempts to encourage more voting would mean “you’d never have a Republican elected in this country again.”

That may not be wrong. Trump has accelerated a decades-old trend toward parties redefining themselves by race and racial attitudes. Racial resentment is now the single most important factor driving Republicans and Republican-leaning movers, according to extensive research, most recently by Nicholas Valentino and Kirill Zhirkov at the University of Michigan — more than religion, culture, class or ideology. An ongoing study by University of North Carolina researchers finds that racial resentment even drives hostility toward mask-wearing and social distancing. Conversely, racial liberalism now drives Democrats of all colors more than any other factor.

Consider just one yardstick, a standard question of racial attitudes in which people are asked to agree or disagree with this statement: “It’s really a matter of some people not trying hard enough; if blacks would only try harder they could be just as well off as whites.”

In 2012, 56 percent of white Republicans agreed with that statement, according to the American National Election Studies. The number grew in 2016 with Trump’s rise, to 59 percent. Last month, an astonishing 71 percent of white Republicans agreed, according to a YouGov poll written by Parker and conducted by GQR (where my wife is a partner).

The opposite movement among white Democrats is even more striking. In 2012, 38 percent agreed that African Americans didn’t try hard enough. In 2016, that dropped to 27 percent. And now? Just 13 percent.

To the extent Trump’s racist provocation is a strategy (rather than simply an instinct), it is a miscalculation. The electorate was more than 90 percent white when Richard Nixon deployed his Southern strategy; the proportion is now 70 percent white and shrinking. But more than that, Trump’s racism has alienated a large number of white people.

“For many white Americans, the things Trump is saying and getting away with, they just didn’t think they lived in a world where that could happen,” says Vincent Hutchings, a political scientist specializing in public opinion at the University of Michigan. Racist appeals in particular alienate white, college-educated women, and even some women without college degrees, he has found: “One of the best ways to exacerbate the gender gap isn’t to talk about gender but to talk about race.”

Trump’s racism has also emboldened white Democrats, who have often been on the losing end of racial politics since George H.W. Bush deployed Willie Horton against Michael Dukakis in 1988. “They’re embracing the racial issues they used to cower on in decades past,” Hetherington says.

This is what Parker had in mind when he wrote in 2016 that Trump could be “good for the United States.” The backlash Trump provoked among whites and nonwhites alike “could kick off a second Reconstruction,” Parker now thinks. “I know it sounds crazy, especially coming from a black man,” he says, but “I think Trump actually is one of the best things that’s happened in this country.”

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Black Lives Matter: Should sports and politics mix? – Al Jazeera English

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LeBron James was told to “shut up and dribble” by a Fox News anchor in 2018 in response to the three-time NBA champion’s comments on racism and being Black in the United States.

Colin Kaepernick was driven out of the NFL after the 2016 season and blasted by Donald Trump for taking a knee during the national anthem – protesting racism, police brutality and racial inequality.

In 1968, Americans Tommie Smith and John Carlos, two Black medal-winning athletes, were booed before being expelled from the Olympics for their podium protest against racism.

Earlier this year, tennis star Noami Osaka was trolled online and faced a backlash after joining the Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests on social media and in Minneapolis and Los Angeles.

Osaka said what she felt because she believed “being silent is never the answer”.

“Everyone should have a voice in the matter and use it,” Osaka said before rubbishing calls that forbid athletes from speaking out on politics, human rights and social issues.

“I hate when random people say athletes shouldn’t get involved with politics and just entertain. What gives you more right to speak than me?”

Osaka is not the only athlete who spoke out following the death of George Floyd in May.

The United Kingdom’s Formula One world champion Lewis Hamilton attended a BLM protest in London and said he was “extremely positive that change will come”.

Coco Gauff, 16-year-old tennis sensation, addressed a protest in Florida, saying: “I was eight when Trayvon Martin was killed. So why am I here at 16 still demanding change?”

But what happens when athletes, with their enormous following, take a stance and are told to “shut up” as they are “not qualified enough” to be discussing matters off the field?

“It’s infuriating. We need the world to know that we’re not just players, we’re individuals with families, rights and feelings,” Hafsa Kamara, a Black American track athlete, told Al Jazeera.

“We are a voice of someone who lives in the same world as others. We need to be heard. People make us feel like we’re only paid to dribble balls and run fast. That’s taking away our rights,” added Kamara, who represented Sierra Leone at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf refused to stand for the national anthem before basketball games in 1996.

US footballer Megan Rapinoe has campaigned for equal pay for women footballers.

Former Afghanistan captain Khalida Popal chose football as a tool to “stand for my rights, and to help other women stand for their rights”.

Marcus Rashford used the coronavirus-enforced break in the English Premier League (EPL) to force the British government to continue providing free school meals for vulnerable children outside term time.

Former Pakistan cricket captain Shahid Afridi regularly spoke about the human rights violations in Indian-occupied Kashmir.

Arsenal and Germany footballer Mesut Ozil spoke out against the persecution of the Uighurs in China.

Rob Koehler, director-general of Global Athlete, a pressure group, said, “Freedom of expression is a fundamental human right”.

“To say an athlete can’t use their platform when they’re unpaid workers coming to the games, bringing all the revenues in, and they can’t use their voice to express about a cause that is important to them, is outdated and out of touch,” Koehler told the AFP news agency. 

In 2016, San Francisco 49ers’ Colin Kaepernick, centre, Eli Harold, left, and Eric Reid took a knee during the US national anthem before an NFL game. [John G Mabanglo/EPA]

While athletes using sport and the field as a platform to highlight societal issues is not new, the backlash and the hostility, even from fervent followers, continues to be loud and dismissive.

Some have even opted to stay clear, most notably when Michael Jordan refused to endorse African American Democrat Harvey Gantt against Republican Jesse Helms, a notorious racist, in the 1990 Senate race.

But the recent global anti-racism protests have made it clear: Sport cannot stay out of politics.

“Athletes are humans like the rest of us, and they have a right to speak out like the rest of us,” Douglas Hartmann, professor and chair of sociology at the University of Minnesota, told Al Jazeera.

“What makes that difficult is the social construction we have of sport being separate from politics. This separation, in many ways, is a constructed and fictitious one,” added Hartmann, who is also author of Midnight Basketball: Race, Sports, and Neoliberal Social Policy.

The convergence of sports and celebrity can have a powerful influence on everyday politics, according to a research paper published last year.

But the courage and the act of speaking out does not come without fear of being reprimanded, rebuked and punished.

Smith and Carlos had their careers ended by the podium protests in 1968.

Gwen Berry and Race Imboden were reprimanded for protesting on the medal stand at the 2019 Pan-Am Games.

In 2018, Manchester City football club’s manager Pep Guardiola was fined for wearing a yellow ribbon in solidarity with the independence movement in Catalonia.

Earlier this year, the International Olympic Committee handed out guidelines banning participants in the now-postponed 2020 Tokyo Olympics from kneeling, fist-raising or “any political messaging”.

People make us feel like we’re paid only to dribble balls and run fast. That’s taking away our rights

Hafsa Kamara

But following the recent surge in voices calling for equality and inclusiveness – and their reach, influence and intensity – sport bodies and organisations have taken unprecedented steps.

The West Indies cricket team was given the all-clear to wear a BLM emblem on their collar during their upcoming Test series in England.

Footballers playing in the EPL had “Black Lives Matter” displayed on their jerseys and were allowed to kneel at the start of the games.

For the league, it seems that all of a sudden, Black lives did matter. But it was quick to clarify the move was “not endorsement of political movement”, and there is a worry among many that it will be temporary – and what happens when players take on the next issue.

“Premier League clubs might have BLM on their shirts, but there are still hardly any Black coaches, for example,” Danyel Reiche, associate professor for Comparative Politics at American University of Beirut, told Al Jazeera.

“It remains to be seen how sports associations react if athletes raise their voices on other issues which are considered as more sensitive, such as the discrimination of Palestinian football players by Israel.

“This also violates the inclusive nature of sport, and I believe such protest should be also accepted,” added Reiche, whose research interests include sport policy and politics.

The EPL also admitted that the display by Rashford and other footballers could set “uncomfortable precedents”.

As a result, Olympian Kamara is not entirely convinced by the genuineness of the associations’ involvement in the protests.

“I feel right now there is the branding and marketing; it’s an opportunity to get into the trends and be part of the hashtags,” Kamara said.

Hartmann also does not feel that the NFL owners “had a big change of heart”.

“They realised who their workers are. It’s far more about where the consumer base is, how dependent the industry is on the celebrity athletes and their voices. They (the owners) have to acknowledge them and allow them the power to do that.”

But in addition to what some athletes term “temporary” gestures by the authorities, there is also still concern about the longevity and lastingness of the movement that has recently seemed to gain momentum.

While Hartmann believes the recent movement has “opened a door” and led to a “significant shift in public perception”, Kamara has reminded her fellow athletes the onus was on them to not “let up” and be a greater and longer part of the conversation despite the criticism.

“If we continue to keep at it, wear the armbands, take a knee and speak up, we’ll let people know it wasn’t a one-off, but it’s our lives we’re talking about – on and off the court.

“We understand that we live a very privileged life. We have a following, and we need to use it to its extreme. We have to keep our word and stand our ground.”

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Coun. Lorelei Nicoll announces end to 12-year municipal politics career in Halifax – Globalnews.ca

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Another Halifax municipal district will have a new councillor by the end of the year.

Coun. Lorelei Nicoll of Cole Harbour Westphal announced on Monday that she will not be seeking re-election in the 2020 municipal election.

Read more:
Halifax Coun. Bill Karsten will not run for re-election in upcoming municipal vote

The decision will bring an end to Nicoll’s 12-year stint in municipal politics.

“In my twelve years in this role, I have worked hard to ensure the communities of Cole Harbour, Westphal, Lake Loon and Cherry Brook have the recognition they deserve,” Nicoll said in a press release.

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Nicoll has served as chair, vice-chair and member of multiple committees, including audit and finance, transportation, community planning and economic development and environment and sustainability.

She also served as deputy mayor, only the second woman to hold the one-year position since amalgamation in 1996.

“I consider my most significant contribution to be the creation of the Women’s Advisory Committee of Halifax,” Nicoll said.

“This committee will oversee municipal issues to improve the quality of life for women in the HRM. This is my legacy to supporting diverse representation and working toward equality for all.”

She concludes her statement by saying that she hoped to have made a difference and by thanking those who allowed her to serve them on Halifax Regional Council.






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Mayor Savage talks reopening and #BlackLivesMatter


Mayor Savage talks reopening and #BlackLivesMatter

Nicoll joins a growing list of councillors who have decided to not re-offer this fall.

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Coun. Bill Karsten of Dartmouth South-Eastern Passage announced in May he’d be stepping aside after four terms in council.

Coun. Stephen Adams of Spryfield-Sambro Loop-Prospect Road announced last year that he would not run for re-election.

Adams had served as a municipal councillor since 1991.

Coun. Matt Whitman of Hammonds Plains-St. Margarets will also not be running for his seat again.

READ MORE: Matt Whitman announces he’s running for mayor

Instead, he will attempt to challenge incumbent Mayor Mike Savage, who has confirmed he will be running for a third four-year term.

That means at least four of the 16 seats on Halifax Regional Council will have a new councillor after the upcoming municipal election.

As of Monday, Coun. Sam Austin, Coun. Waye Mason, Coun. Shawn Cleary and Coun. Richard Zurawski are the only incumbent councillors to have officially declared the candidacy.

The 2020 municipal election is set for Oct. 17.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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China Lays Groundwork to Crackdown Further on Political Threats – BNN

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(Bloomberg) — The Chinese government took steps to boost political policing as a slew of international spats risk sowing domestic unrest, potentially undermining support for the Communist Party.

A special working group on political security was added to a law enforcement task force first established in April to defuse any social unrest stemming from the government’s response to the virus, according to a report from the official Legal Daily.

Lei Dongsheng, vice secretary-general of the Communist Party Central Committee’s Commission for Political and Legal Affairs, is leading the group and “recently” convened its first meeting in Beijing, the article said.

China Plans Tighter Control to Counter Social Unrest Over Virus

At the gathering, it was emphasized that “protecting the safety of the political system” and “safeguarding the regime’s security” should be the first priority. Officials also vowed to take strict precautions against and crackdown on activities including infiltration, subversion, terrorism, ethnic secession and extreme religious activities.

President Xi Jinping warned early in the Covid-19 crisis that the epidemic posed a threat to “social stability” and since then his country has faced criticism from nations including the U.S. and Australia over its handling of the initial outbreak. Xi’s government has repeatedly expressed suspicions that foreign nations are spreading disinformation and attempting to foment unrest within China.

Led by Guo Shengkun, one of the 25 most powerful CCP members, the task force initially set up two working groups: one to maintain social order and the other to contain risks at the city level. The rising international tensions in recent months appear to have added another focus — stemming the influence of international actors on the country’s populace.

The CCP’s Politics and Law Commission said on its official WeChat account on Monday that the new working group’s meeting came as safeguarding political security becomes a top priority “amid a changing global situation.” It cited examples including U.S. politicians “deflecting blame” to China over its failure to contain the pandemic, “intervention” by the U.S., Taiwan, and Australia over national security legislation in Hong Kong and the deadly border conflict with India.

The list of international disputes continues to grow as China asserts its power on the world stage and defends its record on the virus. In recent months, it has also stepped up fighter jet exercises near Taiwan, clashed over territory in the South China Sea, charged two Canadians it detained under murky circumstances, sparred with Australia over an investigation into the virus’s origins and quarreled with the European Union over a range of issues.

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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