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A Second Wind for the Quebec and Canadian Economy Français – Canada NewsWire

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To ensure the fulfillment of this major mandate, AAA Canada has invested more than $450,000 in infrastructure required for the development of sub-assembly lines at affiliate company sites located respectively in Laval and Mirabel. The contract, won by AAA Canada, allows it not only to recall a large number of its workers whom were temporarily laid off following the crisis that affected the aerospace industry as a whole, but also to proceed with the creation of several temporary positions. An invaluable mandate at a time when the economy is faltering, and businesses are running out of steam.

“The health crisis has stifled the Quebec and Canadian economy. The production of the CAE Air1 gave it an unexpected second wind. Thanks to the government’s unwavering support, CAE’s ingenuity and the great responsiveness and flexibility of our workers, we will be able to maintain and create nearly 250 temporary jobs, while helping to save lives. We are very grateful to CAE for this wonderful opportunity and I am extremely proud to witness, once again, AAA Canada’s great determination to dare and innovate,” said Avit Lévesque, General Manager of AAA Canada.

“This is a substantial subsidy as it is equal to the threat this second wave presents to the public health and to the overcrowding of hospitals nationwide. We are proud to have AAA Canada among the Canadian suppliers involved in this collective effort to fight COVID-19. We thank them for their excellent support, expertise and agility,” added Stéphane Roche, Vice President Global Procurement Sourcing and Real Estate at CAE.

About AAA Canada (www.aaa-canada.ca/home)
AAA Canada, an affiliate of DRAKKAR Aerospace & Ground Transportation, is a specialized subcontracting and technical assistance services company related to industrialization and production processes, operating in the aerospace, ground transportation, energy and now health sectors. AAA Canada has a team of passionate workers and draws its strength from the AAA European Group located in the 4 corners of the globe. Supported by AAA Group’s international expertise, we provide a proven intervention method to deliver a high-quality finished product to our customers. Our approach to productivity, timeliness, quality and efficiency gives us a place of choice within our clients’ facilities and operations.

About CAE (www.cae.com)
CAE is a high technology company, at the leading edge of digital immersion, providing solutions to make the world a safer place. Backed by a record of more than 70 years of industry firsts, we continue to reimagine the customer experience and revolutionize training and operational support solutions in civil aviation, defence and security, and healthcare. We are the partner of choice to customers worldwide who operate in complex, high-stakes and largely regulated environments, where successful outcomes are critical. Testament to our customers’ ongoing needs for our solutions, over 60 percent of CAE’s revenue is recurring in nature. We have the broadest global presence in our industry, with approximately 10,000 employees, 160 sites and training locations in over 35 countries. www.cae.com 

SOURCE AAA Canada

For further information: Contact Person: AAA Canada, Rosalie Côté, Senior Director – Communication & Marketing, [email protected], 514-806-0798

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Economy

Charting the Global Economy: Recession Recovery Is Wildly Uneven – BNN

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The world’s economic recovery is wildly uneven — and that again was on display this week.

U.S. data on the eve of the Thanksgiving holiday offered signs of both strain and strength, while Germany’s resilience was again on display in European PMI numbers — even amid new lockdown measures that have knocked the economy back.

No matter where in the world you are, the economic consequences of the pandemic are falling disproportionately on the young. Though if you could chose where to weather the crisis, a new scorecard suggests New Zealand should be high on the list.

Here are some of the charts that appeared on Bloomberg this week on the latest developments in the global economy:

U.S.

U.S. business activity is powering ahead and housing market remains red hot. The annualized rate of new-home sales has averaged 1 million from August through October, the strongest demand since 2006, and a increase in builder backlogs suggest residential construction will remain robust through at least the end of the year.

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Still, some of the ground looks shaky. Americans’ income declined more than forecast in October, the number of people applying for state unemployment benefits unexpectedly increased in consecutive weeks for the first time since July, and consumer sentiment dipped to a three-month low.

Europe

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European economies are contracting again as the latest coronavirus restrictions take a massive toll on services. The Purchasing Managers Index for the euro area slipped back into contraction in November, as did the U.K. Germany, however, is coping with the latest restrictions relatively well.

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U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak sought to balance more jobs support with controversial spending cuts this week to get control of the government’s pandemic debts. According to Bloomberg Economics, the U.K. will struggle to avoid economic scarring, though the hit will probably be smaller than from previous recessions. That’s in part because of the scale of the policy response.

Asia

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Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is trying to break a standoff with China that has stalled delivery of more than US$500 million worth of coal from the world’s biggest exporter as tensions between the two trading partners mount.

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China’s economic recovery stabilized in November, underpinned by solid global demand for exports ahead of the Christmas period and the stock market’s gain to its highest since 2015.

Emerging Markets

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Consumer prices in Latin America’s two largest economies diverged in early November, complicating Brazil’s plans to hold its benchmark interest rate at a record low while suddenly giving Mexico space to cut.

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Bloomberg Economics doesn’t expect Nigeria’s recovery to gain momentum until next year, when the deep oil production cuts agreed in 2020 are eased and the emergence of a vaccine lifts global demand.

World

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In 2019, the U.S.-China trade war blew a hole in global growth, in 2020, the pandemic caused a historic crash, but 2021 could be the year when U.S.-China ties stabilize and a vaccine draws a long-awaited line under the Covid crisis, according to Bloomberg Economics.

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While the people at greatest risk of suffering severe cases of Covid-19 are of retirement age, the economic fallout has been greatest on the young. A look at unemployment rates across Group of Seven economies shows how severely the crisis has hurt 15-24 year olds.

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Bloomberg crunched the numbers to determine the best places to be in the coronavirus era. New Zealand had the highest score. Japan, at No. 2, was the only G-7 country to make the top 10.

–With assistance from Dan Hanson (Economist), Tom Orlik (Economist), Björn van Roye (Economist), Catherine Bosley, Sophie Caronello, Rachel Chang, Eileen Gbagbo, Max de Haldevang, Mario Sergio Lima, Alex Morales, Jason Scott and Kevin Varley.

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Province reports lower deficit, touts recovering economy in mid-year report – CBC.ca

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The provincial government released its mid-year report today and projected a deficit almost $400 million lower than expected. 

Earlier this year, the provincial government forecasted a $2.4 billion deficit but today’s report showed that to be sitting around $2 billion, an improvement of $381.5 million from this year’s budget.

Revenue projections also saw an increase, to the tune of $503.5 million, or 3.7 per cent from the provincial budget announcement.

“The increase from budget is due to higher federal transfers, higher government business enterprise net income and higher non-renewable resource revenue,” a statement from the Ministry of Finance said. 

Tax revenues were projected to decrease by $41.2 million as a reduction in the small business tax rate was factored in. Other tax and own-source revenue forecasts were unchanged from the budget.

Expenses were forecasted to be $16.2 billion, an increase of $122 million, or 0.8 per cent. The increase covered money for the health, education, municipal and tourism sectors and was partly offset by lower-than-budgeted pension expenses and crop insurance claims expenses.

The mid-year forecast included the impacts of the government’s election commitments, totalling $91.7 million.

Finance Minister Donna Harpauer said $260 million was set aside as contingency, which she said is a substantial cushion that’s built in for the remaining six months of the year. She said data from the first six months of the year will help guide the province through the remainder of the year. 

She noted that the contingencies are set aside to protect the healthcare system and said the province will do “whatever it takes” to ensure the system is supported through the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“There is no way to say what the magic number will be … compensation salaries is going to be a big part of that, and that is something that we couldn’t pre-pay,” Harpauer said on Friday. 

“At 160 million, that will deal with quite a bit of that pressure for the next few months.” 

In reflecting on the numbers, Harpauer said she was pleased to see the provincial economic indicators were stronger than what was initially anticipated. 

She said she’s concerned because the province is reliant on two items in particular: consumer confidence and trade. Consumer confidence is affected by COVID-19 numbers, she said, and because the province is trade-dependant, Saskatchewan is heavily affected by what happens in other jurisdictions in Canada and around the world. 

“I will always have a nervousness for those two factors because they will affect this budget in a big way,” Harpauer said. 

Drop in public and net debt

The ministry said public and net debt are both down compared to the budget’s forecasts.

Estimates showed Saskatchewan’s net debt-to-GDP ratio, as of March 31, 2021, would be at 19.6 per cent, one of the lowest in the country, and the ministry touted Saskatchewan’s credit rating as the second-highest in Canada.

“Saskatchewan’s economy has performed better than originally anticipated in the June 2020 budget,” Harpauer said in the provncial release.  

“Real GDP is forecast to decline 5.0 per cent, compared to a decline of 6.3 per cent forecast at budget. Saskatchewan’s unemployment rate was the lowest in Canada in October and total employment, on an unadjusted basis, is nearing pre-pandemic levels.  As a result, our planned path to balance in 2024-25 is unchanged.”

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Bank of Canada says vaccine could cause economy to rebound faster than expected – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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By Julie Gordon and David Ljunggren

OTTAWA (Reuters) – Canada’s economy could rebound faster than expected if consumer spending jumps in the wake of a successful coronavirus vaccination effort, Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem said on Thursday.

On the other hand, if the economy weakens amid a second wave of infections, Macklem indicated the central bank could if necessary cut already record low interest rates.

In late October, the bank said it assumed a vaccine would not be widely available until mid-2022. Since then, several manufacturers have announced potential vaccines that could be distributed starting early next year.

“It is possible, especially when there is a vaccine, that households will decide to spend more than we have forecast and if that happens the economy will rebound more quickly,” Macklem said in response to questions from the House of Commons finance committee. He described the news about vaccines as promising.

In late October, the bank forecast the economy would not fully recover until some time in 2023, a forecast Macklem repeated in his opening remarks.

The path to recovery still faced risks, he said. Earlier this year the bank slashed its key interest rate to 0.25%.

“We could potentially lower the effective lower bound, even without going negative. It’s at 25 basis points, it could be a little bit lower,” Macklem said, repeating that negative interest rates would not be helpful.

The U.S. Federal Reserve has a target for its key rate of 0 to 0.25%. The Reserve Bank of Australia this month cut its policy rate to 0.1%.

Some other central banks also have benchmark rate that are less than 0.25%, such as the European Central Bank and the Bank of England.

“We want to be very clear – Canadians can be confident that borrowing costs are going to remain very low for a long time,” Macklem said.

(With additional reporting by Fergal Smith in Toronto; Editing by Rosalba O’Brien, Tom Brown and Aurora Ellis)

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