Connect with us

Art

‘Aggie’ Review: Portrait of an Art Collector by Her Daughter – The New York Times

Published

 on


Early in the documentary “Aggie,” the director, Catherine Gund, asks her mother and subject, the philanthropist and art collector Agnes Gund, about her expectations for the movie.

“I hope that the film will not be seen by too many people,” replies Agnes — known as Aggie. Stay after the credits for a similar moment in which she appears almost oblivious to the project.

“Aggie” recounts her career and good works. She was president of the Museum of Modern Art from 1991 to 2002, and her projects include founding a program to promote arts education in New York City schools; recognizing and championing a diverse range of artists; and selling a $165 million Roy Lichtenstein from her personal collection to start a fund for criminal justice reform.

The mother-daughter dynamic might have given “Aggie” a perspective distinct from other adulatory profiles of Gund. But it’s not clear that the filmmaker had the distance needed to separate interesting material from banal reminiscence. However great Gund’s influence on other collectors and philanthropists has been, and however progressive and righteous her advocacy for racial justice, “Aggie” doesn’t match her originality with an accordingly innovative approach.

There are a few endearing stories, of, for instance, the time someone nearly tossed a trashlike sculpture by Christo and Jeanne-Claude, and some insights into Gund’s collecting philosophy. (She prefers acquiring work by living artists and watching them develop.) The overall impression is that Gund’s contributions to the art world, to schools and to fighting mass incarceration will last. But the film still may not be seen by many people.

Aggie
Not Rated. Running time: 1 hour 32 minutes. Watch on Film Forum’s virtual cinema.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

First virtual Carmichael Art History Lecture 'absolutely fabulous' – OrilliaMatters

Published

 on


NEWS RELEASE
ORILLIA MUSEUM OF ART & HISTORY (HISTORY COMMITTEE)
********************
“Absolutely Fabulous.” “A wonderful presentation, truly exceptional experience of art and land.” “A true labour of love.”

These were some of the online comments about Jim and Sue Waddington and their presentation, “In the Footsteps of the Group of Seven and Tom Thomson.”

The Waddingtons appeared live via Zoom at the first ever virtual Carmichael Art History lecture hosted by the Orillia Museum of Art & History (OMAH) on Oct. 21. 

When the OMAH History Committee, who coordinates this annual OMAH fundraiser, confirmed with the Waddingtons that the lecture planned for May would have to be cancelled, Jim and Sue rose to the occasion.

“Would you be interested in holding the lecture virtually?”

They were keen to help OMAH with their fundraising efforts by sharing their story this way.

Forced to step outside their comfort zone, OMAH and the History Committee partnered with the Waddingtons to make this virtual event a huge success.

Through their rich narration Jim and Sue shared with viewers a snapshot of their 43-year quest to find the over 800 actual sites where the Group of Seven and Tom Thomson painted, exhibiting their stunning photographs of the locations that mirrored each particular sketch or painting.

Special for the Orillia audience, they included many details about the Orillia-born Franklin Carmichael. 

The audience was also treated to a “reveal” of the location where Carmichael painted Old Barns, Miner’s Bay, the painting OMAH hopes to purchase, which is in the la Cloche region of Ontario, not in the Minden area as was first thought.

It was a wonderful evening. Thanks go to the Waddingtons and to the community for supporting this event.

OMAH will be sending out a general survey regarding future virtual programming. In addition, a survey will be sent specifically to attendees at the virtual Carmichael Art History Lecture. We want to hear about what is in important to you so we can develop rich online experiences that meets your needs and interests.

OMAH is committed to find ways to stay connected to the community both at the museum and virtually. Stay tuned for more virtual programming in the future.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Qaumajuq_new name of Winnipeg Art Gallery's Inuit art centre, an act of decolonization – Turtle Island News

Published

 on


By Adam Laskaris

Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

WINNIPEG, MAN-The Winnipeg Art Gallery’s Inuit Art Centre has a new name.

Qaumajuq Street View Day Rendering. Photo Michael Maltzan Architecture

In a ceremony on Oct. 28, the gallery, known as WAG, announced the centre would be renamed Qaumajuq  1/8HOW-ma-yourq 3/8, an Inuktitut word meaning “It is bright, it is lit”.

Qaumajuq is set to open in February 2021 after construction began in March 2018 on a new 40,000-square-foot-building designed by Michael Maltzan Architecture with Cibinel Architecture. It’s home to the largest public collection of contemporary Inuit art in the world.

The WAG building itself was given a name in Anishinaabemowin,Biindigin Biwaasaeyaah  1/8BEEN- deh-gen Bi-WAH-say-yah 3/8, meaning “Come on in, the dawn of light is here” or “the dawn of light is coming.”

The naming ceremony was hosted by Dr. Stephen Borys, director and CEO of WAG. The ceremony occurred with a small gathering of Borys and Julia Lafreniere, WAG manager of Indigenous Initiatives. A Qulliq lighting ceremony was conducted by Elder Martha Peet, with virtual appearances from Theresie Tungilik and Elder Dr. Mary Courchene. The latter two formally announced the new names in Inuktitut and Anishinaabemowin respectively.

Tungilik, an Inuk artist from Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, said “Qaumajuq will be a place where all walks of life will experience, through the creation of Inuit art, our survival, hardships and resilience.”

Courchene, who comes from the Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba, said the Biindigin Biwaasaeyaah name was created to “include all the Indigenous populations of Manitoba, the First Nations, the Metis, and the Inuit populations.”

“The language keepers and Elders came together in a powerful moment of cross-cultural reflection and relationship-building,”

Borys said. “This initiative is an act of decolonization, supporting reconciliation and Indigenous knowledge transmission for generations to come in an effort to ensure WAG-Qaumajuq will be a home where Indigenous communities feel welcome. Where everyone feels welcome.”

In addition to the new name of Qaumajuq, which will serve as the primary name for the space, various areas within the WAG will also have new names in Inuvialuktun (Inuit), Nehiyawewin (Cree), Dakota, and Michif (Metis) that were given by Indigenous language keepers.

“Indigenous-focused and Indigenous-led initiatives will be at the heart of this new space and giving the spaces Indigenous names is just the start,” reads the WAG’s website where pronunciations and audio clips for the new names are available.

“We are thrilled to share the names of the spaces in the seven Indigenous languages of Manitoba and Inuit Nunangat,” said Dr.

Heather Igloliorte and Dr. Julie Nagam, co-chairs of the Indigenous Advisory Circle for Winnipeg Art Gallery, in a joint statement.

“The Circle demonstrates the breadth of knowledge that represents the relationship to the collection and the buildings and it has been an incredible experience for all Circle members. We are so honoured to gift the institution with these new names that point to a new path forward for galleries and museums in this country,” the statement continued.

The WAG also states that the “historic naming responds to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Article 13 and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Call to Action 14i, both of which reference the importance of Indigenous languages.”

Article 13 reads:

Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literatures, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places and persons.

TRC Call to Action 14i states: Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them.

A press release issued by WAG states that Qaumajuq “will innovate the art museum, taking art from object to full sensory experience with Inuit-led programming.” One of these features includes the three-storey tall column called the `visible vault’ that is filled with thousands of Inuit carvings and immediately viewable upon entry into Qaumajuq.

“This is a place that amplifies and uplifts Inuit stories, connecting Canada’s North and South. This is a site for reconciliation… We can’t wait to unveil this new cultural landmark in the heart of the country with these new names honouring Indigenous voices and languages,” Borys said.

Adam Laskaris is a Local Journalism Initiative reporter who works out of Windspeaker. com. The Local Journalism Initiative is funded by the Government of Canada. 

Add Your Voice

Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Contribute your voice on our contribute page.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Pay Phones Turned Into Public Art, in “Titan” – The New Yorker

Published

 on


Photograph by Chris Maggio for The New Yorker

New York City’s pay phones are obsolete, and, by early next year, they will also be history—removed to make way for Wi-Fi kiosks. Through Jan. 3, a dozen artists (including Glenn Ligon, Patti Smith, and Jimmie Durham, whose contribution is pictured above) are making creative use of phone booths along Sixth Avenue, from Fifty-first to Fifty-sixth Streets. The project, called “Titan,” was co-curated by Damián Ortega and Bree Zucker, in collaboration with the Kurimanzutto gallery.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending