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AI can spot breast cancer better than humans, study finds – Global News

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Artificial intelligence programs can help to predict breast cancer better than humans, according to a new study.

Researchers used an AI program to retrospectively examine thousands of mammograms from U.S. and U.K. breast cancer screening programs and compared the computer’s results to what human experts were able to find.

According to the results, published in the journal Nature, the AI reduced false positives by 5.7 per cent in the U.S. and 1.2 per cent in the U.K. datasets.

It also reduced false negatives by 9.4 per cent in the U.S. and 2.7 per cent in the U.K., meaning it picked up on cancers that humans had missed.


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“This is a huge advance in the potential for early cancer detection,” said Dr. Mozziyar Etemadi, one of the study’s co-authors and a research assistant professor of anesthesiology and biomedical engineering at Northwestern University.

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“Breast cancer is one of the highest causes of cancer mortality in women. Finding cancer earlier means it can be smaller and easier to treat. We hope this will ultimately save a lot of lives.”






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A.I. fuels unprecedented growth in health and science


A.I. fuels unprecedented growth in health and science

The difference between the U.K. and U.S. results likely has to do with the datasets the authors were examining and differences between how breast cancer screening programs work in the two countries. In the U.K., each image is analyzed by two clinical experts, whereas in the U.S., it’s only one.

But while this study is an interesting piece of work and an advancement in the field, AI likely won’t be used to analyze your mammograms anytime soon, said Dr. Alejandro Berlin, a radiation oncologist and medical director of data science, outcomes and smart cancer care at Toronto’s Princess Margaret Cancer Care Centre.


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Research like this has been done retrospectively: taking results we already know and running them through the computer program to see how AI compares, he said, but clinical trials are still ongoing to see how this kind of software works in the real world.

“What AI does, fundamentally, in my view, is predicting things,” he said. A computer program can quickly and cheaply analyze a massive amount of information — more than a person can process — and “find connections and data that were invisible to the human eye.”

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Predicting Alzheimer’s disease with artificial intelligence


Predicting Alzheimer’s disease with artificial intelligence

AI programs are also more consistent than people, he said, in that they don’t have a bad day or come into work overtired and make mistakes. So, they will likely produce more consistent results than a group of people, some of whom might be more talented than others.


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But one of the big questions for Berlin is what do you do with those results?

“You can have an algorithm that performs beautifully in the lab that predicts the likelihood of you having appendicitis,” he said.

“Are you willing to go into the OR just based on that? Or would you like your clinician to take a look at your belly and say: ‘Yes, based on my experience, I think you have appendicitis and we’re going to go through the risks of the surgery together.’”






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How artificial intelligence is being used to improve humans’ lives


How artificial intelligence is being used to improve humans’ lives

AI can help to identify a problem, he said, but deciding what to do about the problem — like treatment options that are best suited to a particular patient — is still better done by a human being, he said.

“Machines lack common sense.”

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Researchers like him are studying how to integrate AI into clinical practice, but there are a lot of unanswered questions, he said, about how much patients will want to trust a computer program and what kinds of questions AI programs are best suited to answer.

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“I think the message is there’s due diligence to be done,” he said. “I think now the burden is on that evaluation piece: what is acceptable for the people affected by cancer and where the maximal value should come if we were to take actions based on these machine learning tools.”

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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KFL&A reports 34 new COVID-19 cases, 304 active – Globalnews.ca

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The Kingston region is once again over the 300 active cases mark, as Wednesday’s 34 new cases bring the daily active case count to 304.

Of the new cases, 10 are in the five-to-11 age group.

Nineteen people remain in hospital, with 11 of those cases are in the intensive care unit. Six people are on ventilators.

Read more:

COVID-19 — Influx of cases causing strain on Kingston hospitals

The cases per 100,000 over the past week is up slightly to 104.7, from 102.8 Tuesday.

The rise in cases locally has also forced the postponing of at least one local event. The Marine Museum of the Great Lakes was scheduled to have its grand opening on Dec. 5 from 2 to 4 p.m.

“As the coronavirus pandemic continues to have significant impacts throughout our communities, the Marine Museum of the Great Lakes at Kingston is committed to supporting the community through this time of heightened risk and uncertainty,” the Marine Museum said in a statement Wednesday.

“We consider the safety of our staff, volunteers and visitors paramount.”


Click to play video: 'As Covid-19 cases rise in the Kingston region the community reacts'



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As Covid-19 cases rise in the Kingston region the community reacts


As Covid-19 cases rise in the Kingston region the community reacts

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Roussin takes aim at HIV stigma – Brandon Sun

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Wednesday was World AIDS Day and the province is getting behind the message to end the stigma of the disease.

There were 117 new cases of HIV identified in the province in 2020, slightly fewer than in 2019.

“Even though there are fewer cases, there was also significantly less testing,” Dr. Brent Roussin, the province’s chief public health officer, said Wednesday.

“Around 25 per cent of people with HIV are unaware they have it, and that can contribute to the spread.”

The stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS continues to be a significant public health issue in the province. Roussin said the populations most at risk are also facing problems of accessibility caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Roussin urged people who may be at risk to get regular testing and speak to their health-care providers regarding prevention, testing and treatment options.

All these services are confidential and free of charge.

Those living with HIV are also encouraged to stay connected to care and treatments.

Roussin said it is considered a chronic infection and there are effective treatments for HIV, with many being able to get the virus level down to undetectable levels and minimizing risk of transmitting it to other people.

» The Brandon Sun

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COVID-19 vaccines: 18% of Ottawa kids 5-11 have 1st doses – Globalnews.ca

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Nearly 14,000 Ottawa kids have gotten their first COVID-19 vaccine shots in their first week of eligibility, according to the local health unit.

Ottawa Public Health’s COVID-19 dashboard reports that 13,887 kids aged five to 11, representing 18 per cent of the total age group in the city, have their initial shots as of Wednesday morning.

Dr. Vera Etches, Ottawa’s medical officer of health, said earlier this week that 40 per cent of local kids in this youngest eligible demographic have appointments booked through the provincial vaccination system. This doesn’t account for shots booked at pharmacies or doctors’ offices.

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No need for new restrictions yet in Ottawa amid Omicron cases, Dr. Etches says

City-wide, 86 per cent of the population aged five and older now have at least one dose.

Meanwhile, OPH reported 50 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, surpassing the 32,000-case mark since the start of the pandemic.

The number of active infections held relatively steady at 329 in the latest report.

There are now 11 people in hospital with COVID-19 in Ottawa, two of whom are in the intensive care unit.


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COVID-19: Proof of vaccine now needed to fly in Canada


COVID-19: Proof of vaccine now needed to fly in Canada

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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