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Alberta logs second consecutive 100-case day, adds 2 more COVID-19 deaths – CTV News

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EDMONTON —
Alberta added more than 100 cases of COVID-19 for the second day in a row Friday.

The province reported 105 cases of the coronavirus, bringing the active-case count to 859.

Hospitals across the province are treating 68 patients with COVID-19, with 13 of them receiving care in ICUs.

Two more Albertans died as a result of the virus since Thursday’s update.

Calgary has 338 active infections, while Edmonton has 182.

There are currently nine regions in the province’s watch category: Edmonton-Duggan, Calgary-Centre, Calgary -lbow, Mackenzie County, County of Stettler No. 6, Wheatland County, Municipal District of Willow Creek No. 26, Municipal District of Pincher Creek No. 9 and Cardston County.

Alberta has reported 9,219 cases of COVID-19, 8,193 recoveries and 167 deaths.

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Hundreds of Calgarians protest against mandatory COVID-19 restrictions – Global News

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The same day Alberta recorded its highest number of daily COVID-19 cases, a rally was held in downtown Calgary to protest government restrictions.

Hundreds of people participated in the protest Saturday afternoon as the province announced 1,731 COVID-19 cases and five new deaths connected to the virus had been reported over the past 24 hours.

Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Postmedia/Jim Wells

Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Postmedia/Jim Wells

Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Postmedia/Jim Wells

Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Postmedia/Jim Wells

READ MORE: Anti-mask rallies draw crowds in Calgary and Edmonton amid coronavirus pandemic

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The “Walk for Freedom” march started at city hall and continued on Stephen Avenue. Many of those in attendance could be seen not wearing masks.

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The demonstration went against new measures announced last Tuesday, including limiting outdoor gatherings to 10 people.

Organizers of the protest said they want fewer government restrictions.

Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Postmedia/Jim Wells

Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Postmedia/Jim Wells

Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Postmedia/Jim Wells

Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Hundreds of people gather in downtown Calgary to protest mandatory COVID-19 restrictions, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.


Postmedia/Jim Wells

The measures will be in effect for three weeks then re-evaluated.

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“These mandatory measures will place new restrictions on social gatherings, worship services, businesses, schools and all Albertans,” Premier Jason Kenney said Tuesday.

“We believe these are the minimum restrictions needed right now to safeguard our health-care system, while avoiding widespread damage to peoples’ livelihood.”

READ MORE: Hundreds protest COVID-19 social restrictions at Alberta legislature grounds

Calgary police said officers were on location monitoring the event and participants “are being investigated.”

“Our ticketing is strategic and will take into consideration a number of factors,” Calgary police said in a statement released Sunday.

“Although citizens may not witness the summons at the time, that does not necessarily mean we are not exploring those options.

“We know this is a difficult time right now and we will use discretion as we do in many aspects of our job.”

Calgary police is responsible for enforcing mandatory COVID-19 restrictions. The service said its public health compliance team is focusing on mass gatherings, self-isolation and quarantine and businesses who are not complying to the restrictions.


Click to play video 'O’Toole says ‘there is no plan for the economy’ if Canada doesn’t have rapid COVID-19 testing, vaccines'



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O’Toole says ‘there is no plan for the economy’ if Canada doesn’t have rapid COVID-19 testing, vaccines


O’Toole says ‘there is no plan for the economy’ if Canada doesn’t have rapid COVID-19 testing, vaccines

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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62 cases of COVID-19 linked to outbreak at window factory in Vaughan – CP24 Toronto's Breaking News

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York Region Public Health says 62 confirmed cases of COVID-19 have been linked to an outbreak at a window manufacturing and installation facility in Vaughan.

In a public notice posted on Sunday, public health officials said they were notified of the first case at State Window Corporation located on Hunter’s Valley Road, just east of Highway 50, on Nov. 10.

Since then, 61 other cases have been identified, prompting York Region Public Health to declare an outbreak on Nov. 20.

“York Region Public Health continues to investigate this workplace outbreak and conduct case management and contact tracing. As the workplace is not open to the general public, the risk is considered low to York Region residents,” officials said.

Also, there are five probable cases and one case under investigation.

Of the 62 individuals, 28 are from Peel Region, 22 are from Toronto, seven are from York Region, and five are from Simcoe-Muskoka.

“Public Health conducted an on-site inspection and continues to work with the employer to identify additional cases and identify close contacts associated with the confirmed cases,” officials said.

York Region said this is the second outbreak at the facility. A total of 17 cases were reported during the initial outbreak that was declared on May 17 and lasted until July 6.

York Region said the outbreak is showing signs of improvement after prevention measures were taken.

The employer has also taken some actions, York Region said. They include providing face shields, hand sanitizers and disinfecting wipes to workers, increasing monitoring of adherence to physical distancing, clearing of lunchroom tables after every use, and introducing multi-lingual screeners to address language barriers.

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N.S. reports 11 new COVID-19 cases; active cases rise to 126 – CTV News Atlantic

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HALIFAX —
Nova Scotia reported 11 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, bringing the total number of active cases to 126.

Ten of the cases are in the Central Zone, one case is in the Western Zone.

With new COVID-19 restrictions having come into effect on Thursday, Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil says it’s crucial that residents make a collective effort.

“By following the new restrictions in the greater Halifax area, we are working together to contain the spread of the virus,” said McNeil in a press release on Sunday. “And wherever you live in the province, we all have a role to play, by limiting non-essential travel and following all the protocols – limit social contacts, practise social distancing, wear a mask and wash your hands. This is how we will flatten the curve.”

“No matter where you live in Nova Scotia, it is important to follow all public health measures,” said Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Robert Strang. “While the majority of the cases are in the Central Zone, COVID-19 can easily find its way into other parts of the province. We must all remain vigilant and continue working to limit spread within, and beyond, Halifax.”

NEW SCHOOL-BASED CASE

On Sunday evening, the province noted an additional case was identified. The case is connected to the Northeast Kings Education Centre in Canning, N.S., located in the Western Zone.

Northeast Kings Education Centre has been closed since its first case of COVID-19 was announced on Tuesday. The province says a public health investigation in the coming days will determine whether the latest case was a close contact of the first confirmed case. The province notes that given the school has been closed, the new case is not believed to have been in school while infectious.

To allow for completion of contact tracing and testing, and out of an abundance of caution, Northeast Kings Education Centre will remain closed for the week and students will be supported while they learn at home.

As with any positive COVID-19 case, public health will be in touch with any close contacts of the case and advise them on next steps. Everyone who is a close contact will be notified, tested and asked to self-isolate for 14 days.

CASE BREAKDOWN

On Saturday, Nova Scotia Health Authority’s labs completed 2,254 Nova Scotia tests.

Since October 1, Nova Scotia has had 44,909 negative test results and 201 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Of those cases, 75 cases are considered resolved and no one has died as a result of the novel coronavirus, leaving 126 active cases in the province.

There is no one in hospital due to COVID-19.

The province’s confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 70.

There are cases confirmed across the province, but most have been identified in the Central Zone, which contains the Halifax Regional Municipality.

The provincial government says cumulative cases by zone may change as data is updated in Panorama, the province’s electronic information system. On Sunday, the province noted the website would not be updated on that day due to technical difficulties.

RAPID TESTING

On Saturday, 540 tests were administered at a rapid-testing pop-up site in Dartmouth with one positive result. The individual was directed to self-isolate and has been referred for a standard test.

Despite seeing only one positive result during Saturday’s rapid testing and lower new case numbers, Microbiology expert, Dr. Todd Hatchett, continues to urge caution.

“There is usually a two-week lag from a peak,” says Hatchett, who was present at a rapid testing event at the Woodlawn Public Library in Dartmouth on Sunday. “We are not past that point where we can say those people who had contacts cannot spread those infections.”

Hatchett says a lot of the success in fighting COVID-19 is happening on the front lines of community-based rapid testing sites.

At rapid testing sites, volunteers ask individuals a series of questions, including questions about the COVID-19 status of their close contacts and family. After being questioned, individuals take a rapid test.

“I think it’s wonderful that they put this together,” says resident Ruby Blois. “It’s a lot of amazing volunteers. I’ll give them full marks for a great effort.”

Rapid testing site volunteer Patrick LeClair – who has no medical science background – signed up to help as a form of community service. He notes training for volunteers is thorough.

“Every time I come in, they run us through the training,” says LeClair. “This is a great opportunity to be a part of this; this is a great opportunity and a historic moment here in Nova Scotia and across the world.”

Dr. Lisa Barrett says the sites are staffed and managed by doctors and trained medical professionals; however, to be successful, they rely on volunteers.

“We asked for volunteers from the community, and we have got them, overwhelmingly,” says Barrett.

Volunteer duties include asking screening questions, processing results, and administering the actual COVID-19 test.

“A week ago, if you told me I would be swabbing people for COVID-19, I would not have believed that,” says LeClair. “It’s great to be here to help people through the process.”

Barrett notes volunteers range from younger people to older people from diverse career backgrounds – all appreciated for their efforts.

“People learn very quickly, and they are good at it,” says Barrett. “There is no one who has trained to be a swabber or tester who has actually not performed really, really well.”

Meanwhile, rapid testing sites are planned at various locations throughout the HRM in the coming weeks, as well as select parts of Nova Scotia outside of the city.

COVID ALERT APP

Canada’s COVID-19 Alert app is available in Nova Scotia.

The app, which can be downloaded through the Apple App Store or Google Play, notifies users if they may have been exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19.

LIST OF SYMPTOMS

Anyone who experiences a fever or new or worsening cough, or two or more of the following new or worsening symptoms, is encouraged to take an online test or call 811 to determine if they need to be tested for COVID-19:

  • Sore throat
  • Headache
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose/nasal congestion

SELF-ISOLATION AND MANDATORY MASKS

Anyone who tests positive for COVID-19 is required to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who travels to Nova Scotia from outside the Atlantic region for non-essential reasons is required to self-isolate for 14 days and must fill out a self-declaration form before coming to the province. Travellers must self-isolate alone, away from others. If they cannot self-isolate alone, their entire household must also self-isolate for 14 days.

Residents of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador are not required to self-isolate when travelling to Nova Scotia, but they must be prepared to provide proof of their place of residency at provincial borders.

Visitors from outside the Atlantic region who have already self-isolated in another Atlantic province for 14 days may travel to Nova Scotia without having to self-isolate again.

It is mandatory to wear a face mask in indoor public spaces in Nova Scotia.

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