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Alberta study shows DNA may not actually be good predictor of disease, health – Global News

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A new study conducted at the University of Alberta suggests that genes have less to do with developing diseases than previously thought.

The study, which involved scientists examining two decades of data, concluded that DNA contribution to disease development is only about five to 10 per cent.

The data they examined looked at the relationship between common gene mutations (also known as single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs) and different diseases.


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“Simply put, DNA is not your destiny, and SNPs are duds for disease prediction,” said David Wishart, a professor of biological science and computing science at the U of A.

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Throughout the study, the U of A team put the data through simulations and modelling systems, looking for correlations in genes and disease.

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“We looked at around 220 different diseases and about 590 different studies, and tried to put all that information together and determine just how much do your genes, or these SNPs, effect your likelihood or risk of getting a disease,” Wishart said.


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The study did highlight some exceptions: Crohn’s disease, celiac disease and macular degeneration have a genetic contribution of approximately 40 to 50 per cent.

“Despite these rare exceptions, it is becoming increasingly clear that the risk for getting most diseases arise from your metabolism, your environment, your lifestyle, or your exposure to various kinds of nutrients, chemicals, bacteria or viruses,” Wishart said.

“You can’t change your genes. But you can change what you eat, you can change your exercise and lifestyle.”

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Wishart said that he believes that genetic testing companies like 23andMe and AncestryDNA are still reliable for finding out ancestry but that they aren’t reliable for disease risks.

“[Disease prediction] has to be taken very lightly,” Wishart said. “Our data tells us that these [DNA factors] are not important risk factors. The projected risk that they’re arguing or suggesting is often highly inflated.”






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DNA test connected 10 siblings but how reliable are tests?


DNA test connected 10 siblings but how reliable are tests?

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Trying to control your waistline? Add whole grains to your diet – The Globe and Mail

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Repeated studies have linked higher whole grain intakes to protection against heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

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If you don’t eat whole grain foods on a daily basis, consider rethinking your menu.

According to researchers from Tufts University in Boston, doing so can help you manage your waist size, blood sugar (glucose) and blood pressure as you age. And it doesn’t take a lot. The sweet spot, it seems, is three whole grain servings each day.

Repeated studies have linked higher whole grain intakes to protection against heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

The latest findings, published earlier this month in the Journal of Nutrition, suggest that whole grains guard against chronic disease by reducing increases in risk factors that occur over time.

What are whole grains?

All grains – such as wheat, rye, barley, spelt, oats – start out as whole grain kernels made up of three layers: The outer bran layer, which contains nearly all the fibre; the inner germ layer, which is rich in nutrients, antioxidants and healthy fats; and the starchy endosperm.

Eating whole grains and 100-per-cent whole grain foods means that you’re getting all parts of the grain kernel.

When whole grains are processed into refined flour, the bran and germ layers are removed, resulting in a loss of most of the fibre, one-quarter of the grain’s protein and a substantial amount of at least 17 nutrients.

About the new study

The researchers compared how whole grain and refined grain intake affected changes in five risk factors for heart disease and stroke: waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, blood pressure, blood triglycerides (fats) and HDL (“good”) blood cholesterol.

They did so by assessing the diets and health of 3,121 middle-aged and older adults, every four years, over a span of 18 years. Participants were, on average, 55 years old at the start of data collection.

People who ate at least three daily servings of whole grains (versus one-half or less) experienced smaller increases in waist circumference. Over each four-year period, waist circumference increased one inch among those who ate few whole grains compared to one-half inch among those who ate more whole grains. The protective effect of whole grains on waist size was strongest in women.

Whole grain eaters also had smaller increases in fasting blood glucose and blood pressure over time.

With respect to refined grains (such as white bread, white pasta and white rice), the results revealed that people who ate four or more servings per day (versus fewer than two) experienced greater increases in waist circumference and smaller declines in blood triglycerides over the study period.

Benefits of whole grains

Eating fibre-rich whole grains can help you feel satiated and prevent overeating. The soluble fibre in whole grains can also help prevent spikes in blood sugar and insulin after eating. This may, in turn, favour fat-burning rather than fat storage.

Whole grains are also good sources of magnesium and potassium, minerals used to regulate blood sugar and blood pressure. And many whole grains contain prebiotic carbohydrates, which fuel beneficial gut microbes.

How to increase your whole-grain intake

One serving of whole grain is equivalent to one slice of 100-per-cent whole grain bread or one-half cup of cooked whole grain pasta or cooked whole grain (including oats, brown rice, farro, millet and hulled barley).

Read labels on packages of whole grain breads, crackers and breakfast cereals. If you don’t see “100-per-cent whole grain” listed, scan the ingredient list to make sure the product doesn’t contain refined grains (for example, wheat flour).

When buying rye bread look for ingredients that indicate whole grain such as whole rye flour, rye meal, rye kernels and rye flakes.

Don’t be fooled by claims of added fibre. Wonder White + Fibre bread, for example, isn’t a whole grain bread. Nor is Catelli’s Smart Pasta. Both are refined grain products with added oat hull fibre (and inulin in the pasta).

If you avoid wheat, rye and barley because they contain gluten, include gluten-free whole grains in your daily diet such as brown rice, quinoa, millet, teff, sorghum, buckwheat, amaranth and gluten-free oats.

Batch cook whole grains so that you have them ready to add to meals. Toss cooked quinoa, bulgur or farro into green salads; add barley, red rice or spelt berries to soups, stews and chilis; or make whole grain bowls with freekeh or brown rice.

Leslie Beck, a Toronto-based private practice dietitian, is director of food and nutrition at Medcan. Follow her on Twitter @LeslieBeckRD

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Jordan to vaccinate children aged 12 years and older against COVID-19 – The Daily Star

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What to know about COVID in Durham on July 25: 61 active cases in home isolation – Toronto Star

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COVID-19 vaccine stock image.

– The Durham Region Health Department reported seven new COVID-19 cases on Sunday. There are 61 active cases in home isolation and zero people in Durham hospitalized with the virus. Durham continues to have no active outbreaks in institutions or workplaces and one active outbreak in a childcare setting.

– Ontario reported 172 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday and two deaths. There are 88 people in the province hospitalized with the virus including 81 patients in an intensive care unit on a ventilator due to COVID-related critical illness. The new cases reported on Sunday include 48 in Toronto, 23 in Peel and 11 in Hamilton.

– International passengers arriving at Pearson airport in Toronto may now be split into different customs lines based on their vaccination status.

 

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