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Alex Kerfoot, Jared McCann, and Travis Dermott left exposed as Maple Leafs protect Justin Holl under 8+1 expansion-draft protection scheme | Maple Leafs Hotstove – Maple Leafs Hot Stove

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Photo by Mark Blinch/NHLI via Getty Images

Many of us wondered if yesterday’s Jared McCann trade was going to change the Maple Leafs’ expansion draft protection list calculations, which had long been assumed to follow the 8+1 protection scheme in order to shield the following names from the selection process:

  • Auston Matthews
  • John Tavares
  • Mitch Marner
  • William Nylander
  • TJ Brodie
  • Morgan Rielly
  • Jake Muzzin
  • Justin Holl
  • Jack Campbell

In the end, the plan remained the same, only now with both Alex Kerfoot and McCann exposed.

What is unclear and won’t be known until Wednesday night during the expansion draft: whether the Leafs have any deals in place to steer Seattle towards a certain player, or if they’re accepting that they’ll lose one of Kerfoot or McCann — with some chance it is Travis Dermott — and are not going to overthink it by giving up an additional asset(s).

Kevin Papetti made an important point in this morning’s breakdown of the McCann trade: if Kyle Dubas knew Kraken GM Ron Francis may well be keen on McCann, losing Filip Hallander and a seventh-round pick to the expansion draft would pretty much be a shoulder shrug in terms of the assets lost to Seattle.

That won’t mean that the decision to go with eight skaters and a goalie in order to keep Justin Holl protected over Kerfoot, McCann, and Dermott won’t be hotly debated in Leafs circles.

What is definitely working in Holl’s favour: he’s paid $2 million for two more seasons, and he has established himself as a reasonably effective complement to Jake Muzzin on a capable shutdown pairing inside the Leafs’ top four. It’s going to be really difficult to find right-handed defensemen who can give the team solid minutes in this role who would be paid at a comparable rate for the next two seasons.

The counterargument is that Jake Muzzin can carry many partners who, in other contexts, may not necessarily be true top-four defensemen, which the 29-year-old Holl may well not be (perhaps more of a #5), and Holl did slow down in terms of his on-ice results at both ends as the season progressed after a good start to 2020-21.

Kerfoot, meanwhile, is paid $3.5 million for two more years, and while his stepping up in the playoff series vs. Montreal after John Tavares went down should not be lost on anyone, he played to 33-point pace last season over 82 games after 28 points in 65 games in his first year with the Leafs in 2019-20. He hasn’t been strictly limited to a bottom-six role, either, as he has received a number of stints up the lineup on the wing next to Tavares. For most of the regular season, Kerfoot felt essentially like “a guy taking shifts” in the Leafs‘ lineup, rarely leaping off of the page or making much of an impact game to game.

To be fair, Kerfoot has provided the Leafs with some value on the penalty kill and earned the trust of Sheldon Keefe in key defensive situations late in games. That said, if Kyle Dubas is doing his job well, the Leafs can probably find better value for their $3.5 million cap dollars if Kerfoot is indeed the Kraken’s selection — which has been the rumour for some time, albeit this was the assumption prior to the McCann acquisition.

The Holl vs. Kerfoot decision, for me, is pretty cut and dry. Holl is a right-handed defenseman who makes $2 million through 2022-23 and has given you reliable shifts inside the top four under tough assignments. You protect him over Kerfoot, and if Kerfoot goes, you look to squeeze more out of the $3.5 million in cap space in terms of scoring depth and overall utility than the Leafs have received out of Kerfoot.

The McCann trade yesterday means the Leafs already have a replacement who is more productive for over $500k less on the cap.

Now, the possibility of losing McCann makes the debate a little more interesting. Just 25 years old, he looks to be a pretty useful and efficient piece in terms of all of what he can provide for $2.95 million next season — he’s played both wings, down the middle, and consistently produced better than .5 points per game, including playing to a 61-point pace last season. That said, he’s not completely cost-controlled beyond 2021-22, after which he’ll be an arbitration-eligible RFA.

Again, if Dubas is doing his job well, I can see the logic for the Leafs going out and finding comparable production out of another forward (or two) with McCann’s $3 million this season if need be as opposed to protecting McCann and potentially needing to go out and replace Holl on the right side of their defense with cap space currently so tight.

All of this said, we won’t have the full picture until any trades with Seattle are known, and, really, until the full offseason puzzle of moves comes into view. What does appear reasonably safe to assume at this point is that Kyle Dubas quite enjoyed having an above-average top-four on the blue line last season and doesn’t have much of an appetite for shuffling any of its pieces.

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Belarus Olympian describes Tokyo ordeal after arriving in Poland – Al Jazeera English

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Belarusian Olympian Krystsina Tsimanouskaya has said she showed the police in Tokyo a translated plea for help on her phone as she sought to avoid being forced on a plane back home amid fears for her safety.

The 24-year-old sprinter refused to board a flight headed for Minsk via Istanbul on Sunday after being hustled to the Japanese capital’s Haneda airport against her wishes because she had publicly criticised her Olympic team’s management.

After seeking protection from the Japanese police, she flew to Poland instead of Belarus on Wednesday.

Poland, which has long been critical of Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko and harboured many activists from Belarus, has granted Tsimanouskaya and her husband humanitarian visas.

Describing her ordeal publicly for the first time, the athlete told Reuters news agency on Thursday that her family feared she would be sent to a psychiatric ward if she went back to Belarus, and that her grandmother had called her to tell her not to return.

“Grandmother called me when they were already driving me to the airport,” Tsimanouskaya said. “I had some 10 seconds. She called me, all that she told me was, ‘Please do not come back to Belarus, it’s not safe.’”

‘I am not afraid’

Sunday’s standoff began after Tsimanouskaya publicly complained that she had been registered by her coaches to participate in a race she had never competed in: the 4×400 metres relay.

She said she was then barred from competing in the 200 metres scheduled to take place on Monday and withdrawn from the Tokyo Games altogether by her team’s officials.

Tsimanouskaya said she had told her coach on Sunday that she was ready to run in the 200 metres, but he then went to make a call.

“And in [a] couple of hours the head coach came to me with the team representative and they said there was a decision made to send me home, we are not the ones who made the decision, we are only executing it. You have 40 minutes. You have to pack your things and go to the airport,” she added.

The decision, she added, came from “high up”.

The Belarus National Olympic Committee had said coaches withdrew Tsimanouskaya from the games on doctors’ advice about her emotional and psychological state.

At the airport in Tokyo, the coaches were taken by surprise, the athlete said.

“They did not expect that in the airport I can approach the police. They think that we are scared to make a move, that we are afraid to speak, afraid to tell the truth to the whole world. But I am not afraid,” Tsimanouskaya said.

The International Olympic Committee has started an investigation into Tsimanouskaya’s case and said it was set to hear from the two Belarusian officials allegedly involved.

Crackdown

Before going to Tokyo, Tsimanouskaya was not among the few Belarusian Olympians who publicly voiced support for the opposition to Lukashenko, who is under Western sanctions after a crackdown on opponents since last year.

Opposition figures have been prosecuted, jailed or fled since mass protests against his rule erupted following an August 2020 election that handed Lukashenko a sixth presidential term, but observers and Belarus’s political opposition denounced it as rigged.

“I have always been far from politics, I didn’t sign any letters or go to any protests, I didn’t say anything against the Belarusian government,” Tsimanouskaya said.

“It may sound cruel because of all the terrible things that happened in Belarus last summer but I was trying to keep away from it … all I have wanted is to go to the Olympics and do my best,” she said.

Sports play a high-profile role in Belarusian politics under Lukashenko, who headed the Belarus Olympic Committee until he was replaced by his son this year.

Tsimanouskaya said she hoped to be able to continue her sporting career in the future and eventually return to Belarus.

“I love my country. I did not betray it,” she said.

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Canada's Damian Warner extends decathlon lead with another Olympic best – CBC.ca

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Canada’s Damian Warner picked up right where he left off in the decathlon. Now, he’s two events away from a gold medal.

The London, Ont., native recorded an Olympic best — his third through eight events in Tokyo — with a time of 13.46 seconds in the 110-metre hurdles on Thursday in Japan. He then posted the third-farthest discus throw in the field at 48.67 metres and cleared a personal-best 4.90 metres in pole vault to maintain his spot atop the decathlon standings.

Warner now sits at 7,490 points, comfortably ahead of 21-year-old Australian Ashley Moloney in second (7,269).

“You go through the whole battle of the decathlon and when you finally finish and you get the result you’re looking for, there’s no greater feeling. If I finish this off, this is a dream come true,” Warner said.

The Canadian said he was particularly pleased with his pole vault, giving credit to his coaches for helping him improve one of his weaker events.

“They’ve been persistent and stuck with me, and I think there’s a lot more bars in my future, but I’m really happy with how today went and it’s time to finish this thing off,” Warner said.

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Find live streams, must-watch video highlights, breaking news and more in one perfect Olympic Games package. Following Team Canada has never been easier or more exciting.

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WATCH | Warner clears personal-best 4.90 metres in pole vault:

London, Ont., native Damian Warner stays in first place after 8 events in the decathlon with a personal best 4.90m in pole vault. Pierce LePage of Whitby, Ont., holds on to third place with a vault of 5.00m. 4:32

Fellow Canadian Pierce LePage, a 25-year-old making his Olympic debut, was fifth in Warner’s hurdles heat, seventh overall in discus and eighth in pole vault, but still managed to hold on to his third-place standing entering the day.

LePage’s 7,175 points put him just ahead of decathlon world-record holder and reigning silver medallist Kevin Mayer of France, who is sitting fourth at 7,129.

“If you’re doing not bad in most of your decathlon then you know something good is going to happen at the end,” LePage, of Whitby, Ont., said.

WATCH | Warner wins 110m hurdles:

Damian Warner of London, Ont., won the 110m hurdles portion of the decathlon by running to an Olympic best time of 13.46 seconds. After six events Warner sits in first place, with fellow Canadian Pierce LePage of Whitby, Ont., in third place. 5:39

In hurdles, Warner sped to the front of the pack quickly and never relinquished his lead, despite knocking a gate over in the process. He waved and said hi to partner Jen Cotten, their son Theo and his mom after he crossed the finish line.

Despite the Olympic best, Warner himself has done better, setting the world-best of 13.36 seconds at the Hypo-Meeting in Austria in May. That time helped the Canadian set a national record of 8,995 points overall — the fourth best in history.

LePage, of Whitby, Ont., posted a time of 14.39 seconds in the hurdles. His personal best is 14.05. He threw 47.14 metres in discus, also well off his personal best of 50.28.

Warner also fell short of both his career best (50.26) and season best (48.74) in discus, with his first throw standing as his top result.

Pole vault has previously caused Warner problems, like at the 2019 Commonwealth Games when he failed to record a height. But the 31-year-old persevered after missing his first two attempts at 4.90 metres to clear his third. Moloney, who cleared five metres, only gained 30 points on the Canadian in the event.

LePage, who said the heat in Tokyo was more excruciating for the pole vault because of the length of the event, also cleared five metres.

“Want to do better in all three [events] but they weren’t too off where I wanted to be. That pole vault was something I’ve never experienced before — really hot out there. But nothing you can do besides look forward to the next two events and make up those points,” he said.

Javelin,1,500m still to come

The decathlon wraps up with javelin and the 1,500-metre beginning Thursday at 6:15 a.m. ET.

Thursday’s results extended Warner’s lead in the competition where the top-ranked decathlete is eyeing his first Olympic gold medal. Warner earned bronze at the 2016 Rio Games.

Warner is coming off an extraordinary winter that saw him train in an empty, unheated hockey arena that his coaches converted to a multi-events facility after COVID-19 shut down the University of Western Ontario fieldhouse. He and his coaches built a long jump pit, brought in a pole jump pit, built a throwing circle and laid down a 40-metre section of track.

On Wednesday in Tokyo, Warner tied his decathlon world-best in the 100-metre, then put down a long jump of 8.24 metres, 0.04 off his world best and an Olympic record in the sport.

WATCH | Warner ties 100m world best:

Damian Warner of London, Ont., matched his world decathlon best time of 10.12 seconds in the 100-metre portion of the Olympic men’s decathlon. Fellow Canadian Pierce LePage of Whitby, Ont., finished third overall with a time of 10.43. 4:43

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Canada's Vincent-Lapointe wins silver in C-1 200m – Yahoo Canada Sports

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TOKYO — Laurence Vincent-Lapointe’s long, winding road to the Tokyo Olympics has led her to the podium. 

The Canadian canoeist won silver in the final of the women’s C-1 200-metre race at a sweltering Sea Forest Waterway on Wednesday. 

The 29-year-old paddler from Trois-Rivières, Que., finished the sprint in a time of 46.786 seconds. 

“I pushed until the end,” Vincent-Lapointe said. “No matter how many people I thought were catching up to me, I was just like, ‘No, no, no. You cannot drop, you cannot let go. Just push until the end.’

“It’s just crazy. I have 13 world championships, but this silver at the Games is so different.”

Nevin Harrison (45.932) of the United States took the gold, while Ukraine’s Liudmyla Luzan (47.034) claimed bronze in temperatures that felt like a staggering 44 C with the humidity on a windy Tokyo Bay. 

Katie Vincent of Mississauga, Ont., finished 8th with a time of 47.834 seconds. 

“We push each other a lot, especially on the water,” said 25-year-old. “That teamwork goes a long way on a day like today. I’m disappointed I can’t be on the podium.

“But to see a Canadian flag rise today is a huge plus and something I think all Canadians in the paddling community will remember.” 

A dominant canoeing force for more than a decade, Vincent-Lapointe had to wait for the sport’s international federation and the International Olympic Committee to make room for women to race at the Olympics. 

That finally happened in Japan. 

She had won a combined six world titles in C-1 and C-2 500 metres by the time women’s canoe was added to the Olympics in 2017 ahead of the Tokyo Games, and went on to win five more by the end of 2018. 

But then her life and career descended into controversy. 

Vincent-Lapointe had an “adverse analytical finding” in July 2019 during an out-of-competition drug test. She was suspended and missed the 2019 world championship, but battled for reinstatement. 

The International Canoe Federation cleared her to compete in January 2020, accepting that Vincent-Lapointe was the victim of third-party contamination of a banned substance. 

The ICU believed her assertion that a trace amount of ligandrol was transferred to her via her ex-boyfriend’s body fluids. 

“I had the feeling I would make (the Olympics),” Vincent-Lapointe said. “In my head … I was like probably, ‘Fake it ’til you make it.’ In my head I was trying to convince myself, ‘You’re going to be at the Games, you’re going to be at the Games.’

“Even the darkest moments I just clung to it, to that feeling. It was so relieving when I finally got my spot in. It was just like, ‘All right, I had the right to believe in myself that I would make it to the Games.’ But once I came here I was like, ‘All right, you made it to the Games, now do your best.'” 

And while COVID-19 was a devastating gut-punch to sports and society around the world, it gave Vincent-Lapointe an opportunity to get back in the groove. 

Missing the 2019 worlds, however, meant she still had to qualify for Tokyo, and the global pandemic didn’t allow her to travel to North American qualifying events. 

Vincent-Lapointe also lost to Vincent in the women’s C-1 200 metres at March’s national trials in Burnaby, B.C. 

Canoe Kayak Canada declined to send paddlers to international World Cups this spring because of the pandemic, but ultimately awarded Vincent-Lapointe an Olympic quota spot following a performance review. 

Next up for Vincent-Lapointe and Vincent is the women’s C-2, where they are medal contenders, on Friday and Saturday. 

In other races involving Canadians on Thursday, kayakers Brian Malfesi of Maple Ridge, B.C., and Vincent Jourdenais Ste-Basile-le-Grand, Que., were sixth in the ‘B’ final of the men’s K-2 1,000 metres, while Toronto’s Nicholas Matveev was sixth in the ‘B’ final of the men’s K-1 200 metres. 

But the day — clearly — belonged to Vincent-Lapointe.

“Going through all I had to go through the last two years, if you’d ask me if I’d do it again, even knowing a silver medal comes at the end of this, I’m not sure I would say yes,” she said in French. “It was extremely difficult. 

“Everybody told me this week that with all I went through, I must be mentally the strongest here.”

Now she has a silver medal to prove it.

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