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Eat This, Not That!

I’m a Doctor and Warn You Never Take this Vitamin

Vitamins are essential for our health. Our bodies just cannot function without them. Although most of our vitamins are obtained from our diet, one-third of adults, and more than 50% of those over age 55, report taking daily vitamin supplements.  People generally believe that vitamins must be safe, and that even if they don’t result in any benefit, they are unlikely to cause harm. It’s an unfortunate fact that this does not seem to be true. As a doctor, I am often asked:Which vitamins are recommended? Is it safe to take vitamins?Which vitamins might be dangerous?What are the side effects of taking vitamins?Are there any special points about taking vitamins safely?Read on, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus.  1 Which Vitamins are Recommended? The truth of the matter is that most people get all the vitamins they need from their diet. If your body has enough vitamins on board, if you take extra vitamins, you will simply excrete them in your urine and feces.There is generally no need to take vitamin supplements. However, there are a few exceptions:Folic acid – Pregnant women are advised to take 400 mcg folic acid per day. This is to help prevent the baby from developing neural tube defects (e.g. spina bifida).Vitamin D  – The current recommendation is for UK adults, at least, is to take 10 mcg (400 IU) per day of vitamin D. This is because low levels of vitamin D are very common. This advice was issued in April at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic because vitamin D is made in the skin in sunlight, and people were only advised to go outside to exercise for 1 hour per day. As the winter is now approaching and the days are becoming shorter, it may be wise to top up vitamin D levels, because all respiratory infections are more common in the winter months, and vitamin D plays an important role in our immune defense. 2 Is it Safe to Take Vitamins? A 2016 review in the Advanced Pharmaceutical Bulletin reviewed all the good quality randomized controlled trials on the use of vitamins between 1993 -2015. The authors concluded that taking high doses of vitamins A, E, D, C, and folic acid did not always help prevent disease, and in some situations could be harmful. They proposed that vitamins should be only issued under the control of a trained pharmacist. 3 Which Vitamins Might be Dangerous—and When? Vitamin E – Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants are important molecules as they have many anti-cancer effects in the body. However, their effect is complex and too many can be harmful.In many studies where vitamin E has been given to patients to try to reduce the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular disease, or death, there has been no significant benefit.Some studies have looked at the effect of vitamin E to prevent prostate cancer, or lung cancer, have even found this led to a small increase in risk. It seems that there are risks associated with taking vitamin E at high doses.Vitamin C – Vitamin C is also a potent antioxidant with many properties, highly beneficial for health. However, many large studies have failed to show that taking vitamin C supplements has any effect on reducing cardiovascular disease, cancer, or death.Many people believe high dose vitamin C can prevent upper respiratory infections.  However, this does not appear to be the case. A 2013 Cochrane data review including 29 trials, and 11, 306 participants failed to show that taking vitamin C supplements prevented the common cold.Vitamin C supplements may even be harmful. In one 2004 study, vitamin C supplements in diabetic women lead to an increase in the mortality from cardiovascular disease.Adverse effects from vitamin C are only seen in those taking supplements. They are not seen when large amounts of vitamin C are ingested in food. Vitamin A – Vitamin A—also known as retinol—is largely derived from beta-carotene, the red/orange pigment in many vegetables such as carrots. Vitamin A is another powerful antioxidant. Studies have shown that by having a good dietary intake of vitamin A, the risk of cancer of the lung, breast, pancreas, and bladder, is reduced. However, taking vitamin A supplements does not seem to have the same effects.For example, in the Beta Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET), 18,000 current or recent smokers, and asbestos workers, were randomly assigned to vitamin A or placebo and followed up. After 6 years there was a 28% increase in lung cancer and a 17% increase in mortality in the vitamin A group.In pregnant women, high doses of vitamin A have been shown to increase the risk of neural tube defects by a factor of 3.5. Vitamin A is now regarded as teratogenic.Although vitamin A is known to be important for bone growth, taking excess vitamin A is not necessarily beneficial. Vitamin A deficiency is associated with poor bone growth, but excess vitamin A results in increased bone resorption (bone clearance) with fragile bones and an increased risk of fracture.Folic acid – This is a water-soluble B vitamin. Folate deficiency increases the risk of developing a new cancer, but excess folate also increases cancer risk, by increasing the rate of cancer cell growth.In one 2009 Norwegian study, 6837 patients with cardiovascular disease were randomly assigned to either folic acid supplements or a placebo and followed up for 9 years. The folic acid group showed a significant increase in cancer outcomes and mortality compared to those on the placebos.Vitamin D – At one time, experts believed that vitamin D supplements could reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and bowel polyps. However, a large, 2006, randomized trial of 36,282 postmenopausal women who took calcium and vitamin D supplements for 7 years, did not show any reduction in colonic cancer incidence.In the UK, calcium and vitamin D supplementation is recommended for perimenopausal or postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis, as it has been shown to improve bone mineral density and prevent fracture. 4 What are the Side Effects of Taking Vitamins? Although most vitamins are well tolerated, side effects are possible with any types of medication. Always check with your healthcare provider if you have chronic medical conditions or take any other regular medication, before you start taking any new tablets, including vitamin supplements.If you have any signs of an acute allergic reaction—acute anaphylaxis—after swallowing a vitamin tablet, you must seek urgent help immediately.Vitamin E – Side effects are rare. These include headaches, dizziness, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, tiredness, and skin rashes. Rarely, vitamin E can cause bleeding problems with nosebleeds, or bleeding gums.Vitamin C – Side effects are rare. These include headaches, flushing, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and migraine at high doses. High doses of vitamin C may increase uric acid levels leading to kidney stones. Vitamin C may raise blood sugars in diabetic patients.Vitamin A –  Side effects are rare. These include headache, fatigue, lethargy, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, and vomiting. Vitamin A can also cause skin drying and cracking, loss of skin (desquamation) and hair loss. At high doses, vitamin A can cause liver toxicity – you should not drink alcohol when taking any vitamin, A supplements.  This list is not exhaustive – always consult your doctor.Folic acid – Side effects are rare. These include – fatigue,  nausea, bloating, passing wind, malaise, and skin rashes. An increase in epileptic seizures has been reported. Some people complain of a bitter taste in the mouth. There may be an association with insomnia.Vitamin D – Side effects are rare. These include nausea, vomiting and skin rashes. Taking too much vitamin D may result in high levels of calcium – hypercalcemia – which is a serious medical condition, associated with confusion, muscle weakness and bone pain. Take your vitamin D supplements exactly as directed and do not be tempted to take too much. 5 Special Points About Taking Vitamins Beware of the fat-soluble vitamins, A, D, E, and K, which can potentially accumulate in the body and are more likely to cause toxicity. Although vitamins K1 and K2 are safe, synthetic vitamin K3 is known to be highly toxic.Water-soluble vitamins, such as most of the B vitamins, are easily excreted from the body every day in the urine. These vitamins are not stored in the same way and are less likely to ever cause toxicity.RELATED: The Unhealthiest Supplements You Shouldn’t Take 6 Can you take too many vitamin supplements? The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) – is the amount of vitamin you need every day to stay healthy.The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) is the maximum amount you should take before you are at risk of an overdose or serious side effects.The UL is not stated on the product label. You can find out the RDA and UL online.The RDA is much lower than the UL. If you stick to the RDA you should not run into problems.Most nutritionists feel that taking a multivitamin is unnecessary if you are eating a healthy diet, but there may be a benefit to certain vitamins in certain situations. A good example is the current UK advice to take additional vitamin D during the current pandemic.It’s important to note that some vitamins should be taken together, and some at sperate times.For example, calcium and vitamin D are taken at the same time, but calcium prevents the absorption of iron from the gut, so calcium and iron should be taken at separate times. 7 Final Thoughts from the Doctor We all need to think carefully about our health right now, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, reaching for a bottle of vitamins will never be as good for you as eating a nutritious balanced diet. Your body is designed to absorb vitamins and minerals from food, not from supplements. These are less well absorbed and do not have the same effects as nutrients from natural food sources. If you are thinking about vitamins, why not concentrate of improving your diet instead? Far more delicious, safer, and much more interesting! And to further protect yourself, and get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don’t miss these 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch COVID. Dr. Deborah Lee is a medical writer for Dr Fox Online Pharmacy.

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Facebook Confirms Its Working On 'Facial Recognition' Technology – Baystreet.ca

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Social media giant Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) has confirmed media reports that the company is planning to incorporate facial recognition technology into its upcoming smart glasses device.

Facebook’s head of hardware, Andrew Bosworth, confirmed the facial recognition technology, saying “We’re looking at it.

“It’s really a debate we need to have with the public,” Bosworth added. “If people don’t want this technology, we don’t have to supply it. The product is going to be fine either way. There are some nice use cases out there, if it’s something people are comfortable with.”

Facebook has been apparently debating the legal implications of facial recognition technology internally for some time now. The company has said it is on track to release its smart glasses product in partnership with Luxottica, the maker of Ray-Ban sunglasses, later this year.

Civil liberties advocates have cautioned against using facial recognition technology, warning that it could further erode people’s personal privacy and lead to the profiling of citizens.

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Nvidia starts boosting frame rates by up to 10 percent on 30-series GPUs – The Verge

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Nvidia has started to roll out support for Resizable BAR, a feature of PCI Express that can boost frame rates in certain games by up to 10 percent. The new RTX 3060 graphics card is the first to include Resizable BAR, which allows certain CPUs to access the full graphics frame buffer, instead of being limited to reading just 256MB blocks. Support for other 30-series GPUs will be available in late March.

You’ll need the right CPU, motherboard, and graphics card to utilize this new feature, and Nvidia is working with both AMD and Intel to provide chipset support. AMD’s Zen 3 CPUs are supported, alongside Intel’s 10th Gen processors and the company’s upcoming 11th Gen S chips.

Much like AMD’s Smart Access Memory, Resizable BAR on Nvidia GPUs can boost frame rates in certain games by up to 10 percent. The boost is really game dependent, and resolution can also impact how much performance will increase. “In our testing, we’ve found some titles benefit from a few percent, up to 10 percent,” says Nvidia. “However, there are also titles that see a decrease in performance.”

Nvidia is pre-testing titles and using special game profiles to enable Resizable BAR only where the performance increases. The following games are currently supported:

  • Assassin’s Creed Valhalla
  • Battlefield V
  • Borderlands 3
  • Forza Horizon 4
  • Gears 5
  • Metro Exodus
  • Red Dead Redemption 2
  • Watch Dogs: Legion

Additional games will be supported in late March, when Nvidia launches VIOS updates for the rest of its 30-series GPUs. Nvidia will supply VBIOS updates for all Founders Edition 30-series cards, and board partners will also release their own updates. You’ll also need a motherboard update that includes the necessary CPU support, and Nvidia says Asus, Asrock, Colorful, Evga, Gigabyte, and MSI have all started supporting Resizable BAR on select motherboards.

Resizable BAR support on the AMD side has been tested widely, and TechSpot found that some games making use of Smart Access Memory could see nearly a 20 percent boost at 1440p and 4K.

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'Final Fantasy VII Remake' soundtrack comes to streaming services today – Yahoo Movies Canada

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GlobeNewswire

Global Food Amino Acid Market (2021 to 2027) – Size, Share, COVID Impact Analysis and Forecast

Dublin, Feb. 26, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “2021 Food Amino Acid Market – Size, Share, COVID Impact Analysis and Forecast to 2027” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering. This report provides comprehensive research with in-depth data and contemporary analysis of Food Amino Acid Market at a global, regional and key country level, split by different sub-segments of the industry.Food Amino Acid Market is quickly reaching its pre-COVID levels and a healthy growth rate is expected over the forecast period driven by the V-shaped recovery in most of the developing nations.Key strategies of companies operating in Food Amino Acid Market Industry are identified as showcasing their contactless manufacturing and delivery methods, highlighting USP statements, focus on product packaging, and increased the presence of products on online platforms.The food industry is set to experience a few changes in 2021 due to the increased consciousness of consumers in selecting food. This inclination towards sustainable, regenerative, plant-based food and demand for foods and beverages with immunity-boosting ingredients is driving the demand for these products and their constituents. Do It Yourself (DIY) trend has seen huge momentum during Corona times and is expected to continue in 2021.Considering the rapidly changing market landscape, companies are changing their perspectives on expanding beyond traditional markets. In addition to focusing on widening applications, introducing new product portfolios, most food and beverage companies are planning to capture domestic and international markets.Fast pace recovery of developing economies leading to increased disposable income will support the Food Amino Acid Market demand between 2021 and 2027.Lockdowns across the globe in 2020 and continuing restrictions in 2021 disrupted the supply chain posing challenges for manufactures in the Food Amino Acid Market. Intense competition, pricing issues, and shifting consumer preferences will continue to put pressure on vendors’ profit margins.The report presents growth projections in the Food Amino Acid Market between 2021 and 2027 for companies operating across different types, applications, and end-user verticals.Short-term and long-term trends affecting the market landscape are included in the research. Further, market drivers, restraints, and potential opportunities are also provided in the report.The Food Amino Acid report computes the 2020 market value in revenue terms based on the average Food Amino Acid prices and sales/revenue models of key companies operating in the Food Amino Acid Market Industry. The study forecasts the market size to 2027 for different types of Food Amino Acid and provides respective market share and growth rates.The study discusses technological innovations and the potential shift in demand among various products in the Food Amino Acid Market, over the forecast period. The leading five companies in the Food Amino Acid Market Industry together with their products, key strategies, and comparisons are provided.The Food Amino Acid Market size, share, and outlook across different types and applications are provided at geographic levels of North America, Asia Pacific, Europe, Middle East Africa, South and Central America. Further, country-level Food Amino Acid Market value is also provided.Scope of the Report Global Food Amino Acid Market Industry size, 2020-2027Market trends, drivers, restraints, and opportunitiesPorter’s Five forces analysisTypes of Food Amino Acid, 2020-2027Food Amino Acid applications and end-user verticals market size, 2020-2027Food Amino Acid Market size across countries, 2020-20275 leading companies in the industry – overview, key strategies, financials, and productsLatest market news and developments Key Topics Covered: 1. Table of Contents1.1 List of Tables1.2 List of Figures2. Food Amino Acid Market Latest Trends, Drivers and Challenges, 2020 -20272.1 Food Amino Acid Market Overview2.2 Post COVID Strategies of Leading Food Amino Acid Companies2.3 Food Amino Acid Market Insights, 2021-20272.3.1 Leading Food Amino Acid types, 2021-20272.3.2 Leading Food Amino Acid End-User industries, 2021-20272.3.3 Fast-Growing countries for Food Amino Acid sales, 2021-20272.4 Food Amino Acid Market Drivers and Restraints2.4.1 Food Amino Acid Demand Drivers to 20272.4.2 Food Amino Acid Challenges to 20272.5 Food Amino Acid Market-Five Forces Analysis2.5.1 Food Amino Acid Industry Attractiveness Index, 20202.5.2 Threat of New Entrants2.5.3 Bargaining Power of Suppliers2.5.4 Bargaining Power of Buyers2.5.5 Intensity of Competitive Rivalry2.5.6 Threat of Substitutes3. Global Food Amino Acid Market Value, Market Share, and Forecast to 20273.1 Global Food Amino Acid Market Overview, 20203.2 Global Food Amino Acid Market Revenue and Forecast, 2021-2027 (US$ Million)3.3 Global Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Type, 2021-20273.4 Global Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by End-User, 2021-20273.5 Global Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Region, 2021-20274. Asia Pacific Food Amino Acid Market Value, Market Share and Forecast to 20274.1 Asia Pacific Food Amino Acid Market Overview, 20204.2 Asia Pacific Food Amino Acid Market Revenue and Forecast, 2021-2027 (US$ Million)4.3 Asia Pacific Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Type, 2021-20274.4 Asia Pacific Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by End-User, 2021-20274.5 Asia Pacific Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Country, 2021-20274.6 Key Companies in Asia Pacific Food Amino Acid Market5. Europe Food Amino Acid Market Value, Market Share, and Forecast to 20275.1 Europe Food Amino Acid Market Overview, 20205.2 Europe Food Amino Acid Market Revenue and Forecast, 2021-2027 (US$ Million)5.3 Europe Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Type, 2021-20275.4 Europe Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by End-User, 2021-20275.5 Europe Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Country, 2021-20275.6 Key Companies in Europe Food Amino Acid Market6. North America Food Amino Acid Market Value, Market Share and Forecast to 20276.1 North America Food Amino Acid Market Overview, 20206.2 North America Food Amino Acid Market Revenue and Forecast, 2021-2027 (US$ Million)6.3 North America Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Type, 2021-20276.4 North America Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by End-User, 2021-20276.5 North America Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Country, 2021-20276.6 Key Companies in North America Food Amino Acid Market7. South and Central America Food Amino Acid Market Value, Market Share and Forecast to 20277.1 South and Central America Food Amino Acid Market Overview, 20207.2 South and Central America Food Amino Acid Market Revenue and Forecast, 2021-2027 (US$ Million)7.3 South and Central America Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Type, 2021-20277.4 South and Central America Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by End-User, 2021-20277.5 South and Central America Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Country, 2021-20277.6 Key Companies in South and Central America Food Amino Acid Market8. Middle East Africa Food Amino Acid Market Value, Market Share and Forecast to 20278.1 Middle East Africa Food Amino Acid Market Overview, 20208.2 Middle East and Africa Food Amino Acid Market Revenue and Forecast, 2021-2027 (US$ Million)8.3 Middle East Africa Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Type, 2021-20278.4 Middle East Africa Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by End-User, 2021-20278.5 Middle East Africa Food Amino Acid Market Size and Share Outlook by Country, 2021-20278.6 Key Companies in Middle East Africa Food Amino Acid Market9. Food Amino Acid Market Structure9.1 Key Players 9.2 Food Amino Acid Companies – Key Strategies and Financial Analysis9.2.1 Snapshot9.2.3 Business Description9.2.4 Products and Services9.2.5 Financial Analysis10. Food Amino Acid Industry Recent Developments11 Appendix11.1 Publisher Expertise11.2 Research Methodology11.3 Annual Subscription Plans11.4 Contact InformationFor more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/gxye7j CONTACT: CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900

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