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Amazon halts all employee travel, Google adds new restrictions due to coronavirus – TechRepublic

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Amazon bans all nonessential employee travel in the US and internationally, and Google expands travel restrictions after an employee is stricken with coronavirus.

In an unexpected move, both Amazon and Google announced new restrictions Friday on employee travel due to concerns over coronavirus and COVID-19, the illness the virus causes.

Amazon has asked all of its 798,000 employees to stop all nonessential travel, both domestic and internationally, immediately, according to an Amazon spokesperon. This is after Amazon already restricted employee travel to China earlier this month.

The cancellations are due to fear of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). The CDC has now 64 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the US, including 47 cases among repatriated individuals. The latest two cases in the US are individuals in northern California and they both have contracted the disease from unknown sources, making them the first possible “community spread” instances of the disease in the US. So far, there have been 2,867 deaths from coronavirus around the world, and there are 83,861 cases globally. Hospitals in the US and the UK are preparing for a coronavirus outbreak.

Travel also restricted for Amazon employees on worldwide team 

The New York Times reported on Friday that Amazon employees on its worldwide operations team, which oversees technology and logistics, were told not to plan any meetings requiring travel until at least April, when the company hoped to have a better sense of the outbreak’s impact.

SEE: Coronavirus having major effect on tech industry beyond supply chain delays (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

Google expanding employee travel restrictions

Google has expanded its employee travel restrictions, now adding South Korea and Japan to the list of areas that already included China, Iran and two Italian regions of Lombardy and Veneto. This occurred after a Google employee tested positive for coronavirus, according to the company. 

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“We can confirm that one employee from our Zurich office has been diagnosed with the coronavirus,” a Google spokesperson said in a statement. “They were in the Zurich office for a limited time, before they had any symptoms. We have taken —- and will continue to take — all necessary precautionary measures, following the advice of public health officials, as we prioritize everyone’s health and safety.”

Google also announced that it is canceling its Google News Initiative Summit because of concerns over coronavirus. The conference had been scheduled for late April in Sunnyvale, Calif. 

“We regret that we have to cancel our global Google News Initiative summit but the health and well-being of our guests is our No. 1 priority,” Richard Gingras, vice president of news at Google, said in a statement.

Google has not yet announced any plans to cancel its own annual developer conference, Google I/O, scheduled for May 12-14 in Mountain View, Calif. 

Tech conferences around the world impacted

Meanwhile,
tech conferences around the globe
have been either cancelled, postponed, or have had significant exhibitors pull out for fear of coronavirus.

“The coronavirus has caused record-breaking event cancellations and postponements worldwide. Compared to last February, there is a 500% increase (and growing) in the cancellation or postponement of significant events. This past month (February 2020), we have seen more than 220 significant and major events between 5,000 to hundreds of thousands of attendees be cancelled or postponed. To give context, there were just 45 significant and major events canceled or postponed in February 2019. And, this is just the tip of the iceberg – we can all expect to see more global events cancelled in the coming months related to the coronavirus concerns,” said Campbell Brown, CEO and co-founder, PredictHQ.

Some of the major conferences cancelled in the past few weeks include Mobile World Congress, which PredictHQ’s data puts the event’s direct economic value at $5 million, Cisco Live Melbourne, Facebook’s annual marketing conference, DEF CON China and the Tokyo Marathon.

How to handle changing travel plans amid an outbreak

The quick-changing travel plans amid an outbreak like COVID-19 can make it difficult for companies to juggle employee travel plans and schedules.

In early February, before tech conferences began being canceled, and before companies started pulling out of events, companies were already limiting employee travel to China. At that time, Martin Ferguson, vice president of public affairs at American Express Global Business Travel, told TechRepublic’s Veronica Combs that he was seeing an increase in clients stopping all nonessential business travel to, from and within Wuhan and mainland China as well as areas surrounding mainland China. Some companies were also asking employees to work from home for two weeks after traveling to China as a precaution. 

With uncertainty affecting many of the decisions being made right now, companies need to keep employee travel plans flexible. For companies that are still allowing travel, request that employees book airline fares that can be canceled or rebooked without penalty, and hotel rooms that can be canceled without penalty. This way, if a conference or event is canceled, the company will not incur additional costs as a result of the employee canceling their trip.

Also, keep schedules flexible. For any upcoming conferences that have yet to be booked, wait. Watch the website for the conference daily to see if the main sponsors are still attending, and if any news is released about the event. Ask employees to wait as long as possible before booking airfare and hotel.

To encourage travel, some airlines are offering free flight cancellations or changes on all newly-booked flights. JetBlue is offering free flight cancellations or changes on all flights booked between February 27 and March 11, if the flight is completed by June 1, 2020, and the credit can be used for future travel. Alaska Airlines is also allowing new tickets booked from February 27 through March 12 for travel through June 1, 2020 to be cancelled or changed and the funds used for future travel. 

SEE: Policy pack: Guidelines for remote workers (TechRepublic Premium)

What to tell employees regarding travel and the coronavirus

As previously reported in TechRepublic, Emma Follansbee, an associate at The National Law Review, recommended what employers should do, and what they should avoid, when discussing travel and the coronavirus with employees:

  • Provide education and information on the virus  — Be brief and repeat what official sources have stated without adding information.The communication goal is to instill confidence in employees that the company is taking proactive steps as necessary
  • Reinforce sick leave policies — The flu season has been worse than usual in the US this season. This is a good time to reiterate sick leave policies. Follansbee also recommends training managers to send people home if they are sick.
  • Consider a temporary travel opt-out policy — Employers should consider temporarily suspending travel directly to a region with a high number of coronavirus cases. Follansbee also suggested that companies consider requiring employees traveling to or from the infected regions to refrain from reporting to work.
  • Don’t offer medical opinions and misinformation: Take a “less is more” approach.
  • Don’t institute employee medical examinations and quarantines: Employers that isolate or quarantine employees when public health agencies have not yet done could be violating protections under the Americans With Disability Act, medical privacy laws, and state wage and hour laws.                  
  • Don’t use selective enforcement of travel opt-outs: This policy must be applied equally across all employees. For example, employers cannot require pregnant or disabled employees to opt out of travel, while requiring other employees to continue traveling to a region. 

Also see 

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Amazon has halted all employee travel due to the coronavirus.

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Amazon has halted all employee travel due to the coronavirus.

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OnePlus confirms an April 2020 launch for the 8 series – Notebookcheck.net

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Please share our article, every link counts!

Deirdre O Donnell, 2020-03-30 (Update: 2020-03-30)

I became a professional writer and editor shortly after graduation. My degrees are in biomedical sciences; however, they led to some experience in the biotech area, which convinced me of its potential to revolutionize our health, environment and lives in general.
This developed into an all-consuming interest in more aspects of tech over time: I can never write enough on the latest electronics, gadgets and innovations. My other interests include imaging, astronomy, and streaming all the things. Oh, and coffee.

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Microsoft says Skype users surge amid coronavirus outbreak – Financial Post

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Microsoft Corp said on Monday its video calling platform Skype saw a 70% jump in usage in March from a month earlier, as more people shift to working from home amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The platform is being used by 40 million people, the company said in a blog post, adding that Skype-to-Skype calling minutes jumped 220% from a month earlier.

(Reporting by Ayanti Bera in Bengaluru; Editing by Aditya Soni)

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Resident Evil 3 Remake Review – CGMagazine

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Kojima Productions is the latest development studio to close their doors after a staff member was diagnosed with COVID-19. According to the site’s release, the employee was quarantined since March 20 while no other person in the office is affected.

“All other Kojima Productions employee was not in the office at the time of symptoms onset,” the team wrote. “Employees are not considered ‘close contacts’, meaning that it is not mandatory to close the office.”

Despite initial thoughts, the Death Stranding team shut its buildings down while following instructions from public health authorities.

The studio also stated it independently took measures to have the teamwork from home and sanitize all of its facilities. This also included keeping an eye on staff during the worldwide pandemic and COVID-19’s two week incubation period for symptoms.

Its safeguard notice was also tweeted out, with fans and other users wishing the team safe.

Kojima Productions on Twitter

Important notice: KOJIMA PRODUCTIONS EMPLOYEE DIAGNOSED WITH COVID-19, ENACTS SAFEGUARD PRECAUTIONS https://t.co/o1X2UukiDX https://t.co/K6FJtq5Tpx

The studio’s latest project includes porting Death Stranding for PC in a partnership with Steam.

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