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Android's yearly updates aren't for you anymore – Android Police

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This year’s big Android update has finally arrived, but there’s not quite the excitement around its release that was common just a few years ago. Given the current worldwide pandemic and Google’s shift to working from home, it’s impressive that Android 11 arrived even close to on time, but the upgrade seemingly crossed the finish line with little fanfare.

The upgrade process has long been a point of criticism for Android, so much so that Google has pulled most public information about how many devices are running the latest OS version. Apple can roll out iOS updates across its entire portfolio of phones and tablets at once, but Google is only a small cog in the Android upgrade machine — chipset makers have to update their hardware drivers, then device manufacturers add their own modifications on top of that, and finally carriers give the final sign-off (sometimes with even more changes, like custom VoIP implementations).

These more staggered updates often limit excitement around new Android versions to the platform’s most devoted fans. Over the years, enthusiasts have largely been responsible for getting others pumped about Android OS updates — folks on Reddit, writers at tech blogs, and of course, the fantastic readers of Android Police. However, as Android becomes a more mature software platform, even enthusiasts don’t have as much to talk about as they did in previous years.

Android 11 focuses almost exclusively on platform changes instead of new features.

Android 11, just like 10 and 9, focuses almost exclusively on underlying platform changes instead of shiny user-facing features. Scoped Storage and temporary permissions continue to rein in unruly behavior from third-party apps, 5G is better supported, apps can’t replace the system navigation anymore, and so on. As with Android 10 and 9, many of the new APIs are there to replace legacy implementations that aren’t as secure or manageable. For example, the new Bubbles feature largely exists to encourage developers to stop using screen overlays. Android updates have also focused on adapting to new form factors, with notch support in Android Pie and compatibility with foldable screens in Android 10.

Simply put, Android updates aren’t necessarily for you anymore. Android is no longer the consumer-focused product it once was, with highly-publicized announcements and tie-ins with candy brands. Android has become a software platform first and foremost, intended for manufacturers to build experiences with, rather than itself being the experience. When so much of the Android experience depends on the OEM or app updates delivered through the Play Store, the underlying version mostly only matters to developers.

It’s easy to look at this change from a cynical perspective. Part of me still sees Google’s lack of updated distribution data as an admission of defeat to the “Android is fragmented!” crowd, but the truth is that the average person wouldn’t notice much of a difference between Android Pie and Android 11. Most of the changes to Android in that time have been behind-the-scenes improvements to privacy and security, and all the core applications (Chrome, Google Photos, Gmail, etc.) have been updated through the Play Store for years. Project Mainline has accelerated this trend, by keeping even more components of Android updated without the need for full system upgrades.

The de-emphasis of features in the OS update cycle has also led to some proclaiming that Android updates are now overrated or don’t matter, which couldn’t be further from the truth. While manufacturers like Samsung and LG often ship features on their devices months or years before they appear in ‘stock’ Android, they can’t make drastic changes to security and APIs, or they would risk breaking compatibility with most apps. TikTok has dominated the news cycle for months over claims that it has been collecting too much personal data, which is exactly the behavior Google has been attempting to curtail with newer platform releases.

Android updates aren’t that exciting anymore, but they’re still as important as ever. Just like a decade ago, updates bring new APIs to developers, much-needed core changes, and new building blocks for manufacturers to use when creating new devices and form factors. The only difference is that most of the new features you and I care about aren’t usually attached to OS upgrades anymore.

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IPhone 12 teardowns look at Apple's latest phones – The Queens County Citizen

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New iPhone 12.

Screenshot / CNET

A IPhone 12 Teardown, released on Thursday, reveals all parts of Apple’s 5G device. Although the video is not in English, it compares the iPhone 12 to the iPhone 11 last year. Its OLED display is much thinner than the iPhone 11 display, 9To5Mac detected. The video also shows a 2,815 mAh battery capacity and Mag Safe System.

IPhone 12s New ceramic phone screen Is Harder than glass, According to Apple, and it will be the first IPhone with 5G.

Another teardown IFixit also examined the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro on FridayThe lack of “surprising” difference between the cameras, the LIDAR sensor and the two phones.

The The iPhone 12 goes on sale on October 23 at 99,799, However The iPhone 12 Pro will cost you 99 999.

Watch the iPhone 12 teardown video below.

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iPhone 12 teardown reveals how 5G has changed things – Engadget

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<a href=”https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+12+and+12+Pro+Teardown/137669″>iFixit iPhone 12 teardown</a>

iFixit

The first two models from Apple’s iPhone 12 have started shipping, and of course the folks at iFixit are busy taking them apart. As of this writing the detailed teardown is still incomplete, but they’ve exposed enough of the details to get a good look under those screens. The iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro are surprisingly similar inside, as iFixit points out that the cheaper model has a plastic spacer in the spot where the Pro puts its telephoto lens and LiDAR sensor.

They also have the same size battery, at 10.78 Wh, which is slightly smaller than the 11.91 and 11.67Wh batteries iFixit reported in last year’s iPhone 11 and 11 Pro. In our review we noted that battery life on the iPhone 12 doesn’t quite match its predecessor, and that could be your explanation.

Of course the teardown also mentions that the phones open on a different side this year, and have much larger logic boards. That’s likely because of the addition of 5G technology, which may be squeezing the battery size Apple can fit in there. iFixit already streamed a video teardown of the new iPhones, if any other interesting details are found in the devices then we’ll update this post to let you know.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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U Spy The Maybach Of Mercedes-Benz’s New S-Class – CarScoops

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The all-new and opulent Mercedes-Maybach S-Class is still in its testing phase, although its unveiling should take place in the coming months seen as how the brand new S-Class is already with us.

While there are different types of S-Class prototypes still out there, like the Mercedes-AMG S63 for example, we’re pretty confident that this particular vehicle, spotted by one of our readers in Germany, is the long-wheelbase Maybach flagship.

Read Also: 2021 Mercedes S-Class Goes Official: All Hail The New Luxury King (+250 Photos & Videos)

The biggest clue isn’t actually the size of the rear pillar, but the cutout of the rear door, which is straighter than on the regular S-Class, whose rear door curves around the rear wheel arch due to its smaller size. It also lacks the third rear-window that’s incorporated on the S-Class’ door.

Unlike its shorter wheelbase siblings, the Mercedes-Maybach S-Class might actually retain a V12 engine, although with a mild-hybrid system. The reason we say “might” is because the 2021 Maybach GLS is powered by a twin-turbo 4.0-liter V8 with 550 horses and 538 lb-ft (729 Nm) of torque, and it’s the GLS 600, not 500 or 550.

Powertrains aside, expect the Maybach saloon to feature all of the new S-Class’ driver assist functions, including its Level 3 automated driving capabilities. The carmaker’s Lidar-powered Drive Pilot system will debut next year and will work in both heavy traffic situations as well as on suitable motorways in Germany.

Related: 2021 Mercedes-Maybach GLS Starts At $160,500 – Costs Twice As Much As The GLS 450

Inside, it should boast a similar setup to the GLS, with two rear seats separated by a large console at the back and a 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster at the front, paired with a 12.8-inch OLED touchscreen display in the middle.

As for pricing, since the current Mercedes-Maybach S-class starts off from around $170,000, we expect more of the same from the all-new car. If the carmaker keeps doing two separate variants like before, then the flagship model will probably cost north of $200,000.

Thanks to Lars for sharing the pictures!

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