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Anti-vax Ottawa mother banned from giving teenage son COVID vaccine advice – Montreal Gazette

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The judge granted the boy’s father sole decision-making when it came to getting vaccinated

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An Ottawa mom has been legally banned from telling her 14-year-old son not to get the COVID-19 vaccines and prohibited by court order from showing him online information that calls into question the safety or efficacy of the vaccines.

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In her family court decision released Oct. 18, Ontario Superior Court Justice Jennifer Mackinnon granted the boy’s father sole parental decision-making authority regarding the vaccine. The judge said the boy was entitled to be vaccinated and sided with the father’s lawyer, Linda Hanson, who presented the court with supporting information from reputable organizations and doctors who recommend getting vaccinated.

The parents share custody of the boy and decision-making.

The boy’s father petitioned the court for sole decision-making authority when it came to getting his son vaccinated.

The mother opposed the motion and retained Dr. Mary E. O’Connor, who wrote a supporting letter saying the boy should not be vaccinated because he has asthma, the vaccine is experimental and there’s no evidence of benefits to children.

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The judge noted: “Dr. O’Connor does not refer to medical or scientific support for her conclusion that there is no evidence of any benefits to children from the vaccine other than she has heard of ill effects in her practice. This statement is too general to be given weight.”

The doctor, who has not yet responded to voice mails and text messages for comment, also wrote that the vaccines have many adverse effects, “including deaths.”

The Ottawa doctor finished off the letter, writing: “Anyone who administers such a vaccine will be held responsible and liable for any adverse effects that would occur immediately, or in the years to come.”

The judge decided that it was in the best interests of the boy to be vaccinated against COVID-19.

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The judge also noted that it seemed the boy had been influenced about his apparent position on not getting vaccinated.

“I find that the current views expressed by the child are not independent, rather are the result of influence by his mother and the doctor she retained to oppose the motion. The mother will be ordered … not to provide the child with any information directly or indirectly about COVID-19 vaccines contrary to what is provided by the Canadian, Ontario and Ottawa public health authorities.”

In a Sept. 18, 2021, letter filed in court, O’Connor wrote that she had already discussed the “concerns about the risks of this needle.” The doctor said the boy “definitely said that he does not want this vaccination.”

The judge decided otherwise and granted the boy’s father sole decision-making when it came to getting vaccinated.

This newspaper is not naming the parents in this case to protect the identity of the boy.

gdimmock@postmedia.com

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COVID-19: Children between five and 11 are eligible for vaccinations starting Monday – Vancouver Sun

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Health Canada approved the Pfizer vaccine for children aged five to 11 on Nov. 19. This vaccine uses a lower dose of 10 micrograms — one-third of the dose given to older children and adults

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Children in B.C. between five and 11 years old start receiving the first doses of their COVID-19 vaccines on Monday.

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More than 90,000 out of the 350,000 eligible children, or 26 per cent, in that age category were registered a week before the rollout, according to the B.C. government.

The government’s own surveys show that most parents support getting vaccines for their young children, but there are some whose views might keep the vaccination rate lower for this age category.

Of B.C. parents who responded, 58 per cent will register to vaccinate their children right away, while another 18 per cent planned to wait, and nearly 25 per cent said they are not sure they will do it, according to Penny Ballem, the executive lead for B.C.’s immunization efforts.

A parent or legal guardian has to give verbal consent ahead of a child being vaccinated, according to Ballem.

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Health Canada approved the Pfizer vaccine for children aged five to 11 on Nov. 19. This vaccine uses a lower dose of 10 micrograms that is one-third of the dose given to older children and adults.

COVID-19 information from the B.C. Centre for Disease Control from Nov. 25 shows that 80 per cent of British Columbians at the next age group up, aged 12 to 17, are now fully vaccinated and more than 87 per cent have a first dose.

There are varying rates in different health authorities, however. In Fraser, Vancouver Coastal and Vancouver Island, it is higher at 82 per cent, 89 per cent and 83 per cent, respectively. In Interior, it was 70 per cent and in Northern, it was 59 per cent.

Within authorities, there is also a wide spectrum. As of Nov. 23, Enderby and Kettle Creek in the Interior authority had only 38 per cent of 12- to 17-year-olds double vaccinated, while Kimberley posted 80 per cent. In Vancouver Coastal, Bella Coola Valley had 59 per cent of 12- to 17-year-olds double vaccinated, while North Vancouver was at 93 per cent.

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Between Oct. 27 to Nov. 25, the number of average daily cases per 100,000 people among the double vaccinated for this 12 to 17 age group across B.C. was 2.5. Among those who had one vaccination, the number of average daily cases per 100,000 people was 8.2. And for the unvaccinated, the figure was 46.8 per 100,000.

For that same period, in the category of 0-11 year olds, who are all unvaccinated, the number of average daily cases per 100,000 people was 16.8.

“I think the most important thing is that vaccinations be readily available for all children and families,” said Teri Mooring, president of the B.C. Teachers’ Federation.

“For families where it’s not convenient for them to book an appointment in a separate clinic or perhaps they work long hours or there are other various individual circumstances, we think there should be an option (for COVID-19 vaccination) in schools as well.”

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Mooring said that “it was a concern with the 12- to 17-year-olds as well and what we’re seeing in some parts of the province, where we have vaccine hesitancy, we are still those (vaccination) numbers lag behind. We don’t want that to be the case for the five to 11-year-olds.”

Youth aged 12 to 18 have to carry a B.C. Vaccine card, or have a trusted adult carry one for them, to go to restaurants and attend indoor, organized events. Unlike adults, they don’t have to also show government-issued identification. Children aged five to 11 are not be required to show proof of vaccination.

jlee-young@postmedia.com

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Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

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Tougher COVID-19 measures in Sudbury/Manitoulin districts – My Eespanola Now

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The Medical Officer of Health for Public Health Sudbury & Districts is reinstating work-from-home requirements.

Dr Penny Sutcliffe also says strong recommendations for COVID-19 protections are being issued to area schools, businesses, and organizations and stricter measures for the follow-up of contacts of cases of COVID-19 are being enacted.

Public Health is reissuing its call to everyone to continue to limit outings, work from home, get vaccinated, wear a mask and keep two metres distance from those outside your household.

They say continued high COVID19 rates mean that the Public Health Sudbury & Districts area is among the top three most affected jurisdictions in Ontario.

As of Friday, the agency had 288 active cases with Health Sciences North reporting 38 admitted patients with seven in intensive care.

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First children's vaccination clinic in Chatham fully booked – BlackburnNews.com

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First children’s vaccination clinic in Chatham fully booked

10-year-old Lucy Gillette from Chatham was the first to receive a COVID-19 vaccine at the Bradley Centre Clinic in Chatham on Saturday, November 27, 2021. (Photo courtesy of CKPHU)

Lucy Gillette, age 10, Chatham


Hundreds of Band-Aids were plastered onto the little arms of kids in Chatham-Kent who rolled up their sleeves for their first COVID-19 vaccine.

Chatham-Kent Public Health Unit (CKPHU) says 550 doses were administered to children aged five to 11 on Saturday for the first day of the municipality’s pediatric vaccination campaign.

“Things went really well and there has been a lot of excitement,” said Jeff Moco with Chatham-Kent Public Health Communications. “People seem to be excited to start this next phase of the vaccination campaign.”

Appointments for Pfizer-BioNTech’s pediatric vaccine at the Bradley Centre in Chatham opened on Tuesday, November 23.

The clinic has been transformed into a youth-friendly vaccination clinic with a “Super-Kid” theme that includes bright colours, balloons, and costumes.

“It has a different vibe, we have the balloons and the superhero theme,” said Moco. “It’s a lot of fun and lighthearted.”

The vaccination clinic at the Bradley Centre will run Tuesday to Saturday from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Moco said another clinic has been added this Monday, which has a lot of spaces still available.

There are also three vaccine clinics planned at schools beginning next month.

The school clinics will be at Blenheim District Secondary School on December 6, 2021, Wallaceburg District Secondary School on December 13, and Tilbury District Secondary School on December 20.

All school clinics run from 3 p.m. until 8 p.m. and everyone is welcome to get the shot at those clinics.

“I don’t think any kid likes getting a vaccination but what we have been hearing is that they see other people in their lives get vaccinated and feel left out,” said Moco. “Some of them have been interested in doing their part and it’s kind of neat seeing that mindset in young people.”

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