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AP journalist, other media workers return to Myanmar court – CTV News

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YANGON, MYANMAR —
Associated Press journalist Thein Zaw and several other members of the media who have been charged under a public order law while covering anti-coup protests in Myanmar are returning to court Wednesday.

It is the second round of hearings for the journalists, who were arrested on Feb. 27 and face up to three years behind bars. Thein Zaw’s lawyer, Tin Zar Oo, said after the first hearing on March 12 that she might be able to submit an application for bail on Wednesday.

About 40 members of the media have been detained since the coup, and roughly half of them remain in custody, according to Myanmar’s Assistance Association for Political Prisoners. Seven, including Thein Zaw, were arrested on Feb. 27.

Authorities also cancelled the licenses of five local outlets that had extensively covered the protests. Mizzima, Democratic Voice of Burma, Khit Thit Media, Myanmar Now and 7Day News have continued operating despite being barred from broadcasting or publishing on any media platform.

“Associated Press journalist Thein Zaw and all other journalists wrongly detained in Myanmar should be immediately and unconditionally released,” Shawn Crispin, senior representative for Southeast Asia of the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists said after the March 12 hearing. “The abuse of vague criminal charges to jail journalists is tantamount to making all news reporting a crime. Myanmar’s junta must stop detaining journalists and allow reporters to do their jobs without fear of reprisal.”

Thein Zaw and others are charged under Sub-Section 505(A) of the Penal Code, which criminalizes “any attempt to cause fear, spread false news, or agitate directly or indirectly a criminal offence against a government employee.”

Section 505 covers seditious activities, and was amended by the junta to include a broader range of offences and extend the maximum prison term from two years to three.

Thein Zaw was arrested as he was photographing police, some of them armed, charging at anti-coup protesters. A video shows that although he stepped to the side of the street to get out of their way, several police rushed over and surrounded him. One put him in a chokehold as he was handcuffed and then taken away.

Lawyer Tin Zar Oo said Wednesday’s hearing will take place at a special court in Insein Prison in northern Yangon, where Thein Zaw has been held since his arrest. The prison has been notorious for decades for holding political detainees, and hundreds of people arrested during the latest crackdown are jailed there.

At the previous hearing, Tin Zar Oo and one of Thein Zaw’s brothers were allowed into the courtroom to take part in the 10-minute videoconference, along with a representative from the U.S. Embassy and his translator.

Until then, Thein Zaw had not been seen by his lawyer or any of his family members since his arrest. Tin Zar Oo said visits at Insein Prison, where he is being held, were not allowed because of coronavirus concerns, so his family has been dropping off food and supplies for him at the gate.

Tin Zar Oo said that her client looked healthy at the March 12 hearing, but suffered from asthma at night. She said Thein Zaw’s brother commented that he had lost weight.

The Associated Press and many press freedom organizations have called for the release of Thein Zaw and the other detained journalists.

“Independent journalists must be allowed to freely and safely report the news without fear of retribution,” Ian Phillips, AP vice-president for international news, said after the arrest. “AP decries in the strongest terms the arbitrary detention of Thein Zaw.”

The U.S. government, in addition to criticizing the coup and the violence by Myanmar’s security forces, has been supportive of press freedom in the Southeast Asian nation.

“We condemn the attempted media blackout and efforts to silence the voices of the people by revoking the licenses of several local media organizations,” U.S. State Department spokesperson Ned Price said earlier this month. “We are deeply concerned about the increasing attacks on the freedom of expression, including for members of the press. We call for the release of journalists and for all others who have been unjustly detained.”

Even during deposed leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s time in office, journalists were often targeted for their reporting.

Two journalists working for the Reuters news agency were arrested in 2017 while working on a story about military violence directed at Myanmar’s Rohingya minority. They were accused of illegally possessing official documents and sentenced to seven years before being freed in 2019 in a mass presidential pardon.

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Media Advisory: Premier Furey, Minister Coady and Minister Haggie to Announce Mandatory Vaccination Policy – News Releases – Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

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The Honourable Andrew Furey, Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Honourable Siobhan Coady, Deputy Premier and President of Treasury Board, and the Honourable John Haggie, Minister of Health and Community Services, will announce the province’s mandatory vaccination policy today (Friday, October 15) at 1:00 p.m. at the Media Centre, East Block, Confederation Building.

The event will be live-streamed on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Facebook and YouTube accounts. Media covering the announcement will have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. Media planning to attend this event should register with Jillian Hood (jillianhood@gov.nl.ca) by 11:00 a.m.

Technical Briefing

Prior to the event, a technical briefing for media will be held at 12:00 p.m.

Media attending the briefing will have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. Media who wish to participate in the technical briefing should RSVP to Jillian Hood (jillianhood@gov.nl.ca), who will provide the details and the required information.

Media must join the teleconference at 11:45 a.m. (NST) to be included on the call. For sound quality purposes, registered media are asked to use a land line if at all possible.

-30-

Media contacts
Meghan McCabe
Office of the Premier
709-729-3960
meghanmccabe@gov.nl.ca

Victoria Barbour
Treasury Board Secretariat
709-729-4087
victoriabarbour@gov.nl.ca

Lesley Clarke
Health and Community Services
709-729-6986, 699-2910
lesleyclarke@gov.nl.ca

2021 10 15
9:11 am

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In 2022 Mobile Will Replace Direct Mail As The Top Local Media Advertising Platform – Forbes

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In yet another sign that marketers are allocating more of the ad budget to digital media. In 2022, BIA projects for the first time, in the local marketplace, more ad dollars will be allocated to mobile than any other medium including direct mail.

As the ad marketplace continues to recover post-pandemic, BIA forecasts local media ad spend to total $161.5 billion, a year-over-year increase of 10.1%. In 2022, BIA still expects more ad dollars will be spent on traditional media ($84.6billion) than will digital media ($76.8 billion). Although BIA forecasts local digital ad spend to exceed local traditional media in 2023. The digital duopoly of Google ($26.8 billion) and Facebook ($14.3 billion) is projected to account for slightly over half of all digital ad dollars spent locally next year. In addition, with mid-term elections set for November 2022, BIA expects $7.5 billion in total political ad spend. 

Next year local ad spend for mobile is expected to reach $34.0 billion, accounting for 21% of all ad dollars. Direct Mail, which had been the leader in local ad spend for many years, is expected to total $33.4 billion (20.7%) in ad spend. BIA ad spend forecast for PC/laptop is forecast at $27.5 billion (17.1%). Local advertisers are projected to allocate $21.0 billion in 2022 (13.0%) for television. Rounding out the top five will be local radio at $12.7 billion (7.9%).

When local television ad spend is broken out, BIA projects terrestrial TV to garner $19.3 billion in ad dollars next year and an additional $1.7 billion being allocated toward digital. Overall, local television ad revenue will have a strong year-over-year increase of 26.5%. Helping to drive the growth for local TV will be the political dollars. BIA estimates that local broadcast TV will total $3.4 billion next year in political ad dollars, making it the largest product category for the medium.

Similarly, for local radio, a large majority of ad dollars are expected to be allocated to over-the-air ($11.0 billion) with $1.7 billion going to digital. Radio, which doesn’t get the political ad dollars that television receives, will still benefit as more employees commute to and from work.

In a press release Rick Ducey, managing director of BIA Advisory Services, points to four reasons why mobile has surpassed direct mail and is expected to be the top advertising medium in 2022 and beyond:

·       COVID’s impact on consumer’s increased time spent with mobile and other digital media making digital the place to find and target consumers.

·       Digital’s overall momentum in winning more revenue share of media time from traditional media.

·       The rise of virtual consumer channels like delivery, curbside pickup and e-commerce in top categories like retail, restaurants, CPG where physical channels like retail store visits decline.

·       Greater consumer acceptance and use of virtual and e-commerce channels.

The growth in mobile ad spend has been driven by the change in media habits begun during the pandemic. eMarketer recently released a report that said mobile now accounts for one-third of all screen time every day. In 2021 daily time spent with mobile (non-voice) is expected to average 4 hours and 23 minutes, compared to 3 hours and 45 minutes in 2019. eMarketer expects mobile usage to increase by six minutes in both 2022 and 2023. In addition, time spent with mobile will account for over half (54.8%) of the nearly eight hours U.S. adults spend daily with digital media.

Within mobile, smartphone usage is the largest. The daily time spent with smartphones is expected to reach three hours and ten minutes in 2021, compared to 2 hours and 34 minutes in 2019. Smart phones usage now accounts for nearly one-quarter of total media time spent. Among the reasons cited for the leap in smartphone usage has been social media consumption led by TikTok, podcasting, gaming and shopping.

Among the results from Mary Meeker’s latest annual Internet Trends report is that mobile has become the first screen. Meeker also noted that nowadays three-quarters of web users regularly shop online with younger age groups more likely to use a mobile device for e-commerce.

Additionally, with the roll-out of the high-speed 5G, viewing to streaming video on mobile devices is expected to increase.

BIA expects mobile will continue to generate the most local ad dollars of any platform in the upcoming years.

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FSJ RCMP responds to social media post | Energeticcity.ca – Local news from Northeast BC – Energeticcity.ca

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Constable Chad Neustaeter, Media Relations Officer for Fort St. John RCMP, says it would be appropriate to describe what was actually occurring. He says this same individual has been arrested for Mischief, Loss of Enjoyment to Property after the property owner reported the individual for busking, panhandling and making customers feel uncomfortable in late September.

The business owner knew the man had a court condition not to attend the property, and knowing the individual was breaching conditions of his release, called police.

“In this instance, a new frontline police officer to Fort St John was given the opportunity to work through the investigation process and was conducting police checks to determine if there were in fact conditions and what those conditions were in order to make an educated decision that was in everyone’s best interest,” said Neustaeter.

The author of the social media post asked the question ‘what are we paying them for?’ Neustaeter says officers were conducting a full investigation on behalf of the complainant.

“During the investigation, the man was apologetic to police. The lead investigating officer exercised discretion and released the man who said he would leave. The business was updated accordingly and were satisfied with the actions of police.”

Neustaeter says there is often more than meets the eye of the public when it comes to policing.

“In this case, the public also did not get a chance to see the conclusion when the man walked away and the business owner was satisfied.”

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