Connect with us

Economy

AP VoteCast: Voters split on virus, economy, even football – The Outlook

Published

 on


WASHINGTON — As they chose a leader in a time of turmoil, supporters of President Donald Trump and former Vice-President Joe Biden found little common ground on the top crises facing the nation.

The divide between Republican and Democratic America cut across the economy, public health and racial justice, according to AP VoteCast, a national survey of the electorate.

article continues below

Among the few shared views in the two camps of voters: Trump has changed the way things work in Washington. Most Trump voters say he has changed Washington for the better; most Biden voters say he’s changed it for the worse.

Here’s a snapshot of who voted and what matters to them, based on preliminary results from AP VoteCast, a survey of more than 133,000 voters and nonvoters nationwide conducted for The Associated Press by NORC at the University of Chicago.

TWO DIFFERENT WORLDS

The differences between Trump and Biden supporters — on the virus, the economy, even on football — are stark.

As U.S. coronavirus cases rise, claiming more than 232,000 lives, a majority of Biden voters — about 6 in 10 — said the pandemic was the most important issue facing the country. And Biden voters overwhelmingly said the federal government should prioritize limiting the spread of the virus — even if that damages the economy.

But Trump voters were more focused on the economy. About half of Trump voters called the economy and jobs the top issue facing the nation, while only 1 in 10 Biden voters named it most important.

The two groups did not agree on the state of the economy, either. Trump voters remain adamant that the economy is in good shape: About three-quarters call national economic conditions excellent or good. About 8 in 10 Biden voters call them not so good or poor.

Partisanship even seemed to cloud views on football among voters in many states, including Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan and Ohio. When the coronavirus threatened the Big Ten’s college football season, Trump campaigned on ensuring the games would be played. Not surprisingly, across eight states, voters who approved of the Big Ten playing this year supported Trump over Biden. Those who saw it as a mistake were more likely to back Biden.

LOYAL TO TRUMP

Trump won four years ago with a message of disruption, promising to shake up the Washington establishment, roll back regulations and put America first — and his message still resonates with his supporters. They like what they’re seeing.

Trump voters overwhelmingly said their vote was an endorsement of him, not cast in opposition to Biden. And they were more likely than Biden voters to say they agreed with their candidate all or most of the time, 81% versus 74%.

An overwhelming majority of Trump voters continue to want to shake up the political system — even after four years of Trump’s leadership. But in a twist, a large majority of Democrats now agree — although they’d like a shake-up to oust Trump.

But both candidates’ voters expressed worries about Washington corruption, with an overwhelming majority saying they believe corruption would be a “major problem” in their opponent’s administration.

THE PANDEMIC’S PERSONAL IMPACT

Although a wide majority of voters said the coronavirus pandemic has affected them personally, there were deep racial and partisan disparities.

About 4 in 10 Black voters and about 3 in 10 Latino voters said they lost a family member or close friend to the virus, while just over 1 in 10 white voters said the same.

Latino and Black voters also were more likely to lose household income because of the pandemic: nearly half of Latino voters and about 4 in 10 Black voters, compared with about a third of white voters.

Voters in cities were more likely than those in other communities to say they have lost a close friend or family member. Urban voters also report income loss somewhat more than other voters.

All these groups of voters fall into Biden’s column, meaning his voters were somewhat more likely than Trump voters to say they’ve felt the impact in at least one of the ways the survey asked about, 73% to 62%.

VOTING

Voters did not stay on the sidelines, with experts predicting total votes will exceed the 139 million cast in 2016. About 101 million people voted ahead of Election Day.

About three-quarters said they’ve known all along who they were supporting in this election.

Voters were measured in their confidence that the vote count would be accurate — despite Trump seeking to sow doubts about the integrity of the vote count.

About a quarter of voters said they are very confident that the votes in the election will be counted accurately, while just under half were somewhat confident. Roughly 3 in 10 said they are not confident in an accurate vote count.

RACIAL UNREST

A summer of protests and sometimes-violent clashes over racial inequality in policing exposed sharply divergent views on racism.

An overwhelming majority of Black voters said racism in the U.S. is a “very serious” problem, but fewer than half of white voters said it is.

Nearly two-thirds of Black voters and about 4 in 10 Latino voters said police are too tough on crime. But among white voters, only about a quarter said police are too tough and roughly as many said police are not tough enough.

Those divisions translate into partisan splits. Biden voters almost universally said racism is a serious problem in U.S. society and in policing, including about 7 in 10 who called it “very” serious. A slim majority of Trump voters — who are overwhelming white — called racism a serious problem in U.S. society, and just under half said it was a serious problem in policing.

But compared with the pandemic and the economy, relatively few voters deemed racism or law enforcement the country’s top issue: 7% said racism was most important and just 4% said law enforcement was.

___

Webber reported from Fenton, Michigan.

___

AP VoteCast is a survey of the American electorate conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago for Fox News, NPR, PBS NewsHour, Univision News, USA Today Network, The Wall Street Journal and The Associated Press. The survey of 110,482 voters was conducted for eight days, concluding as polls closed. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish. The survey combines a random sample of registered voters drawn from state voter files; self-identified registered voters using NORC’s probability basedAmeriSpeak panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population; and self-identified registered voters selected from nonprobability online panels. The margin of sampling error for voters is estimated to be plus or minus 0.4 percentage points. Find more details about AP VoteCast’s methodology at https://ap.org/votecast.

___

Online:

For AP’s complete coverage of the U.S. presidential elections: https://apnews.com/hub/election-2020

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

As economy struggles, Fed weighs boosting bond purchases – Investment Executive

Published

 on


The Fed since June has been buying $120 billion in bonds each month to keep downward pressure on long-term interest rates as a way of giving the economy a boost as it struggles to emerge from a deep recession.

The purchases have included $80 billion a month in Treasury bonds and $40 billion in mortgage-backed securities.

With the economy showing signs of slowing in the face a resurgence in coronavirus cases and a return to shutdowns in some areas, there has been market speculation that the Fed could decide to boost the size of its monthly purchases.

The minutes show that while no decision was taken on what to do or when, Fed officials were keeping their options open. Some analysts believe the Fed will make an announcement on boosting the bond purchase program at its next meeting on Dec. 15-16, especially if there has been no movement by Congress to provide more economic relief to individuals and businesses.

The minutes said that many Fed officials “judged that asset purchases helped provide insurance against risks that might reemerge in financial markets in an environment of high uncertainty.”

Concern has been growing among economists that the economy is slowing after an initial rebound this summer and could even topple into a double-dip recession in the early part of 2021 if Congress does not replenish expiring support programs.

At the White House Wednesday, Peter Navarro, one of President Donald Trump’s economic advisers, told reporters that a “sober” reading of the economic recovery shows “we are facing … a chasm ahead for millions of Americans unless there can be a bipartisan” deal to provide further economic relief.

The minutes released Wednesday covered the Fed’s Nov. 4-5 meeting, held just after the November elections, and were released with the customary lag of three weeks.

At the meeting, the central bank kept its benchmark interest rate at a record low near zero and signalled that it was prepared to do more if needed to support the economy.

A multitrillion-dollar stimulus effort enacted in the spring has helped support millions of Americans who have been thrown out of work and provided further assistance to struggling individuals and businesses.

But many of those programs have expired and jobless benefits are due to run out for millions of Americans by the end of this year.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell had said at a news conference following the two-day meeting that Fed officials had discussed whether and how a bond buying program might be altered to provide more economic support.

In addition to increasing the size of the program, the Fed could decide to alter the composition of the bonds purchases to focus on buying long-term securities as a way of putting added downward pressure on long-term rates.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Mexico Economy Grows at Record Pace With Long Recovery Ahead – Yahoo Canada Finance

Published

 on


GlobeNewswire

Chicco Black Friday & Cyber Monday Deals (2020): Best Nextfit Car Seat, Bravo Travel System & More Deals Reviewed by Saver Trends

Review of the latest Chicco deals for Black Friday & Cyber Monday, featuring offers on Keyfit 30 car seat, Bravo Travel System & more Here’s a comparison of the latest Chicco deals for Black Friday & Cyber Monday, including the best sales on convertible car seats, car seat and bases and more. Links to the top deals are listed below.Best Chicco Deals: * Save up to 43% on Chicco travel systems, carriers, sterilizers, and more at Walmart – see the latest discounts on a wide variety of Chicco infant car seats, strollers, food warmers, and modular sterilizers   * Save on Chicco travel systems, portable bassinets, hook-on chairs, and more at Amazon  – click the link to see live prices on top-rated baby safety car seats, travel gear, and more * Save on top-rated Chicco baby safety car seats, travel systems at buybuyBABY.com – check live prices on Chicco KeyFit 30 Infant Car Seat, Chicco Fit 4-in-1 Convertible Car Seat, and more      * Save up to 32% on top-rated Chicco travel systems at Walmart – check the latest deals on travel system models, including Chicco Mini Bravo, Chicco Activ3 Jogging, Chicco Bravo Trio, and more    * Save on best-selling Chicco KeyFit series car seats at Walmart – click the link for the latest deals on Chicco KeyFit series car seats, including the Onyx, Regatta, Q Collection, and more    * Save up to $90 on car seats from the Chicco NextFit series at Walmart – check the latest savings on top-rated Chicco NextFit convertible car seats    Best Baby Deals: * Save up to 40% off on a wide selection of baby gear at Walmart – find the latest deals on car seats, strollers, bassinets, activity centers, bouncers & rockers, carriers, playmats, and more   * Save up to 40% on Graco baby strollers, car seats & more baby gear at GracoBaby.com – click the link to see updated prices on best Pack ‘n Play® playards and other top-rated Graco cribs, strollers, and car seats * Save up to 49% on baby gear including car seats, strollers, clothing & essentials at Amazon – check live prices on clothing, bedding, baby care items and accessories   * Save up to $105 on baby strollers, car seats, cribs & more at buybuyBABY.com – including deals on Fisher Price, Carter’s and Disney    * Save on a wide range of Burt’s Bees baby items at BurtsBees.com – click the link for latest deals on baby ointment, lotion, creams, and bath bundles from Burt’s Bees    * Shop baby swings, bassinets, playards & more at 4moms.com – click the link to see the latest prices on baby stuff like the mamaRoo4, rockaRoo, mamaRoo sleep bassinet, and more   Searching for more deals? We recommend checking Walmart’s Black Friday & Cyber Monday sale and Amazon’s Black Friday & Cyber Monday deals for thousands more live discounts. Saver Trends earns commissions from purchases made using the links provided.About Saver Trends: Saver Trends research and share online sales news. As an Amazon Associate and affiliate Saver Trends earns from qualifying purchases.Contact: Andy Mathews (andy@nicelynetwork.com)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Iran economy could rebound to 4.4% growth if U.S. sanctions lifted: IIF – TheChronicleHerald.ca

Published

 on


By Davide Barbuscia

DUBAI (Reuters) – Iran’s economy could grow 4.4% next year if U.S. President-elect Joe Biden lifts sanctions that have contributed to a deep three-year recession, although the COVID-19 crisis could limit foreign investment, the Institute of International Finance (IIF) said.

Biden’s victory in the Nov. 3 U.S. election has raised chances that the United States could rejoin a deal Iran reached with world powers in 2015, under which sanctions were lifted in return for curbs on Iran’s nuclear programme.

This is unlikely to happen overnight, however, and the prospects remain uncertain as the adversaries would both want additional commitments.

Iran’s rial currency has lost about 50% of its value against the U.S. dollar in 2020, reflecting economic damage from sanctions and the coronavirus pandemic, although it strengthened in late October in anticipation Biden would unseat U.S. President Donald Trump.

Iran has the highest COVID-19 death toll in the Middle East.

Trump abandoned the nuclear deal in 2018, and Tehran responded by scaling down its compliance.

The IIF, a trade body for the global financial industry, said that if United States lifted most of the economic sanctions on Iran by the end of 2021, the economy could expand 4.4% next year after an expected 6.1% contraction in 2020.

It would then grow by 6.9% in 2022 and 6% in 2023, the IIF said, adding that if oil exports increase, Iran could see its foreign reserves rise to $109.4 billion by the end of 2023.

Tehran has spoken optimistically about the return of foreign companies under a new U.S. administration, but lack of financial transparency could still curb interest from firms who had made tentative moves to invest after the 2015 deal was struck.

Garbis Iradian, IIF’s chief economist for the MENA region, told Reuters foreign direct investment inflows would increase progressively from this year’s $890 million to over $6.4 billion in 2025.

Assuming most sanctions could be lifted by late next year, FDI is likely to remain below $2 billion in 2021, with most of the money coming from China, Iradian said, adding: “Moreover, the coronavirus pandemic will limit FDI inflows in 2021.”

The Iranian economy would remain fragile, though “not to the brink of collapse” if most of the sanctions remain in place, the IIF said.

Under such a “pessimistic” scenario, Iran would post 1.8% growth next year and its foreign reserves would steadily decrease from about $80 billion this year to $46.9 billion by the end of 2023.

About 90% of Iran’s official reserves are frozen abroad due to U.S. sanctions.

(Reporting by Davide Barbuscia; Editing by Catherine Evans)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending