Connect with us

Tech

Apple's App Store appeals process would make 'Kafka blush,' entrepreneur tells Congress – CNBC

Published

 on


Apple CEO Tim Cook delivers the keynote address during a special event on September 10, 2019 in the Steve Jobs Theater on Apple’s Cupertino, California campus.

Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

Technology executives said that Apple’s App Store platform has too much power in a congressional hearing in Boulder, Colorado on Friday.

The hearing, held by the House Antitrust Subcommittee, is another signal that Washington lawmakers are increasingly scrutinizing big technology companies over power that might not always harm consumers, but can hurt smaller businesses.

The hearing, which focused on Amazon, Facebook, and Google, and at times Apple, also indicates that lawmakers continue to lump big technology antitrust concerns together, despite the fact that the companies operate different marketplaces and face different allegations of anti-competitive behavior.

Complaints about the App Store

For Apple, the entrepreneurs focused on Apple’s App Store, which is the only way for most people to install software on an iPhone.

Basecamp founder David Heinemeier Hansson said that anyone who submits applications to the App Store is worried that Apple could reject their app, and that the company’s system of appeals is difficult to navigate.

“All it takes is being assigned the wrong clerk,” Hansson said. “Then you’ll be stuck in an appeals process that would make Kafka blush.”

Hansson was referring to Franz Kafka’s novel “The Trial,” which describes a frustrating, mysterious bureaucracy. 

Hansson also criticized Apple’s practice of taking 30% of total sales processed through the App Store as “outrageous” and said his company had designed its apps to avoid it.

“We created the App Store with two goals in mind: that it be a safe and trusted place for customers to discover and download apps, and a great business opportunity for all developers,” Apple said. “We continually work with developers and take their feedback on how to help protect user privacy while also providing the tools developers need to make the best app experiences.”

Apple employees review every single app and update that are distributed through the App Store, CNBC previously reported, and some reviewers said that the process and rejections can be arbitrary.

Developers who disagree with an App Review decision, which is made based on Apple’s App Store guidelines, can appeal to a board called the App Review Board, CNBC reported, which can change a lower level reviewer’s decision. It is partially composed of reviewers with good track records, people familiar with the process previously told CNBC.

Last year, Apple published published a new webpage that explains the principles that govern the App Store as well as the most common reasons for rejection.

Complaints from accessory-maker Tile

Tile also testified at the hearing. Tile sells small square-shaped products that can help you find lost belongings.

Tile’s General Counsel, Kirsten Daru, alleged that Apple removed Tile’s hardware products out of Apple stores after reports that Apple was planning a competitive product. Last year, Apple launched the “Find My” app, which tracks MacBooks and other lost Apple products, an update to Apple’s “Find My iPhone” app that launched in 2010. 

Daru said Apple didn’t give Tile access to hardware features in the iPhone, including persistent access to user location, that Apple uses for its own products. Tile says it was prevented from getting that access because of Apple’s claims to focus on privacy. Apple introduced a new feature last year where its operating system frequently asks users whether they want to share the device’s location, instead of asking once when an app is installed, as previous versions had. 

“Apple is acting as a gatekeeper to applications and technologies in a way that favors its own interests,” Daru said.

Apple answered those complaints in an email to CNBC.

“Apple builds its hardware, software and system level apps to protect user privacy and provide the best products and ecosystem in the world,” an Apple spokesperson told CNBC. “Apple has not built a business model around knowing a customer’s location or the location of their device,” the company said, noting they can use the Find My app to locate lost Apple products.

“Customers have control over their location data, including the location of their device. If a user doesn’t want to enable these features, there’s a clear, easy to understand setting where they can choose exactly which location services they want enabled or disabled,” Apple added, saying it would address Tile’s concerns over background location access in a future software update. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Tech

OnePlus 10 Pro and OnePlus Nord 2 CE release dates posed a month apart from each other – Notebookcheck.net

Published

 on


91mobiles

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Tech

Apple requires employees to have proof of a COVID booster as Omicron spreads, according to reports – Euronews

Published

 on


Apple will require retail and corporate employees to provide proof of a COVID-19 booster shot, The Verge reported on Saturday citing an internal email.

Starting January 24, unvaccinated employees or those who haven’t submitted proof of vaccination will need negative COVID-19 tests to enter Apple workplaces, the report said.

The Verge said it was not immediately clear if the testing requirement applies to both corporate and retail employees.

“Due to waning efficacy of the primary series of COVID-19 vaccines and the emergence of highly transmissible variants such as Omicron, a booster shot is now part of staying up to date with your COVID-19 vaccination to protect against severe disease,” the memo read, according to The Verge.

Apple did not immediately respond to a request from Reuters for comment.

Many companies in the US have been strengthening their COVID-19 rules, mandating vaccination and delaying back-to-office plans as the Omicron variant increases infections across the country.

This week, Facebook parent Meta Platforms mandated COVID-19 booster shots for all workers returning to offices. It also delayed U.S. office reopenings to March 28, from an earlier plan of January 31.

Alphabet Inc’s Google on Friday said it was temporarily mandating weekly COVID-19 tests for people entering its US offices.

A report by The Information said Amazon.com Inc has offered its US warehouse workers $40 (€35) to get a booster shot.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Tech

The mid-2012 MacBook Pro 13-inch will soon become obsolete – Vaughan Today

Published

 on



Apple will declare the mid-2012 13.3-inch MacBook Pro a “legacy” on January 31, according to an internal memo intercepted by Apple. Mac rumors. This is the last step before it becomes permanently outdated: it means that Apple will stop providing compatible parts to Apple Stores and Authorized Service Centers. It will always be possible to get a repair in the event of a breakdown, but within the limits of the available parts: this will therefore be increasingly difficult, up to the complete obsolescence that must be declared in a couple of years. You can refer to the list of old and outdated products on this page.

The mid 2012 13.3-inch MacBook Pro is the last model to feature an integrated CD/DVD drive. It was on sale until October 2016 to provide a more affordable alternative to models with Retina displays, which explains this late obsolescence. It is particularly reliable and offers interesting upgrade possibilities for people who want to replace the optical drive with a second volume. It is a standout model. Its time and about to give it up.

Links not showing up? Pictures are missing? Your ad blocker plays tricks on you.
To view all of our content, please turn off your ad blocker!

“Proud thinker. Tv fanatic. Communicator. Evil student. Food junkie. Passionate coffee geek. Award-winning alcohol advocate.”

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending