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Are the 2020s When Print Media Will End? – WWD

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If you look through enough comments by several media executives in recent years, most foresee a time when the period of printed media comes to an end.

Although print products, subscriptions and even ever-dwindling newsstand sales typically make more money for publishers than digital, they also cost a lot more to produce. While publishers are still set on squeezing what money they can out of the shrinking number of people who prefer a print product over a screen, mainly by regularly increasing the price of magazines and newspapers, more than ever before publishing executives are willing to admit that print may not be a part of the business forever.

“At least 10 years is what we can see in the U.S. for our print products,” said Mark Thompson, chief executive officer of The New York Times. “There may come a point when the economics of [the print paper] no longer make sense for us.”

Thompson said that on CNBC about 18 months ago. This despite digital subscriptions to The Times being bigger than ever at around 3.5 million and the company having ambitions of paid digital readers reaching 10 million, a number that could likely float a continued print business, if that’s what the Times wanted.

Marty Baron, executive editor of The Washington Post, also thinks printed news has an expiration date. He told his own paper earlier this year that they could “discard the lingering notion that paper will remain for long a big part of what we do. It will not.” 

Baron didn’t put a specific time frame on it, saying instead print will continue “for a while, yes” but pointedly adding, “It will not last.”

So, America’s two largest and most successful newspapers seem to be firmly in the corner of print becoming a question in a “Jeopardy!” category about the early 21st century. What about the tech guys, like Google? The company makes heavy use of newspaper and magazine content for its core search engine and has lately been investing in news-related projects.

Richard Gingras, a veteran news and media executive who is now vice president of news at Google, also doesn’t see print sticking around too much longer.

“Clearly, it’s going to peter out,” he said a year ago. “Five years, 10 years, I don’t know. If you simply look at younger generations, it’s completely irrelevant — our heads are in [our smartphones] all day. So what’s the value of a print vehicle?”

That makes two huge sectors of media in the “end of print” camp. One relative holdout, unsurprisingly, is magazines. Executives from both Condé Nast and Hearst Magazines see their titles, at least some of them, continuing on.

Although Hearst is taking a hard turn into digital, with new executives and a restructuring of the magazines’ sales business, chief content officer Kate Lewis said she’s planning for magazines to exist 20 years from now, claiming subscribers are still “strong.”

“Magazines can fill that [role] of a gift that you’re giving yourself,” Lewis said. “In some cases, they’re both an indulgence and a utility…it’s a combination of those things and I think there’s an appetite still. I really do.”

Roger Lynch, just a few months into his role as ceo of Condé, still sees a future for print, too, albeit likely on an even smaller scale than it is now.

At Recode’s annual fall media conference, Lynch admitted that other of Condé’s 10 remaining print magazines “may make that transition [to digital-only] at some point.” He characterized Self — out of print since 2017 after almost 40 years — as a success story in this regard, saying the business has turned around. He didn’t have the same praise for Glamour, which closed regular print in 2018.

Lynch did single out Condé’s now-core titles of Vogue, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, Wired, GQ and Architectural Digest as ones he “can’t imagine” not being in print.

Nevertheless, a handful of magazines don’t make a robust print media economy. The new era of the Twenties is likely the decade that printed magazines and newspapers take their place firmly in the past.

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Public Advisory: Update on Provincial Alert Level; Minister Haggie Available to Media – News Releases – Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

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Based on the current epidemiology of the province, the Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Janice Fitzgerald, advises that the province will remain in the modified Alert Level 4 until at least January 24, 2022. A further assessment on the province’s Alert Level will be made at that time.

The Honourable John Haggie, Minister of Health and Community Services, will hold a media availability today (Monday, January 17) at 2:30 p.m. to discuss Alert Levels.

The availability will be live-streamed on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Facebook and Twitter accounts and on YouTube. All media covering the availability will join by Zoom only. To participate, please RSVP to Jillian Hood (jillianhood@gov.nl.ca) who will provide the details.

Media planning to participate must join at 2:15 (NST) to be included on the availability.

– 30 –

Media contact
Nancy Hollett
Health and Community Services
709-729-6554, 327-7878
nancyhollett@gov.nl.ca

2022 01 17
12:50 pm

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Social media challenge supports late Betty White’s love for animals – Globalnews.ca

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Hollywood icon Betty White would’ve been 100 years old today.

To honour the Golden Girls star’s support for animal advocacy, people around the globe are celebrating the Betty White Challenge — recognizing what would’ve been a milestone by contributing to White’s favourite cause.

Winnipeg Humane Society CEO Jessica Miller told 680 CJOB that White’s love for animals is something that shone through in many of the tributes the late actress received in recent weeks.


Actress Betty White (L) and Delilah (R) pose during the American Humane Association Hero Dog Awards 2013 held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013, in Beverly Hills, Calif.


Ryan Miller / Getty Images

Read more:

Betty White died from stroke she suffered on Christmas Day, doctor says

“Loving animals is just such a sincere, true show of character, and Betty was certainly that. She was a very, very beloved advocate and animal lover,” said Miller.

“When this got brought to our attention, we thought, wow, that’s such a nice way to honour such a lovely lady. We decided we would accept donations but we wouldn’t technically ask for them.”

The challenge, spurred on by the social media hashtag #BettyWhiteChallenge, encourages fans to donate what they can to a local animal shelter on White’s birthday.

Miller said anyone wishing to donate on White’s behalf can do so online.

“We’ll see what happens throughout the day,” she said. “Whatever comes in for our animals is amazing.”


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Social media challenge supports late Betty White’s love for animals


Social media challenge supports late Betty White’s love for animals

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Media Release: HPEPH confirms first case of Influenza A in the region – Hastings Prince Edward Public Health

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Media Release: HPEPH confirms first case of Influenza A in the region  Hastings Prince Edward Public Health



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