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Art At Night Hosting online event – pictouadvocate.com

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As so many
events have been cancelled lately art lovers and those isolating inside will
have something to look forward to this weekend as Art At Night goes online for
the first time ever to help continue to bring local art and performance to the community.

A Facebook
group has been created for the event with posts of art and more being spread
out through the evening to give people time to look at and enjoy without
feeling rushed.

“We have
created a group on Facebook outside of our general page, where all of the
artwork and performances will be posted. The artists will submit their artwork
on there, and we will push their posts through on somewhat of a schedule. We
want to make sure that there are posts going out to the public spread out
throughout the evening,” said Ian Grant, board member and organizer for the
event.

“We’ve had
over 70 submissions, so we are confident it will be able to fill the evening.”

The event
will begin about 7 p.m. Saturday, May 2.

Grant shared
that artists can submit before that time on the website www.artatnight.ca by filling out a submission form
there. Those interested in viewing the submissions can find the group by
searching “New Glasgow’s Art at Night Online Art Show 2020.”

“Well our
initial decision was to cancel. There wasn’t a lot of talk about moving to
online. But as the days went by and we received feedback from artists and the
community, and we saw more things moving to more of a virtual setting, we
thought that it would be a good opportunity to continue with our event and to
provide that platform to local artists that we do year after year,” said Grant.

To make the
event have a similar feel to the original, it will only be live for 72 hours.

“We wanted
to concentrate everything around our usual 7-11 time. We did want to leave it
open for a few days so artists could reach out to any potential buyers they
have for their work,” he said. “We will also be holding a contest during the
event for $20 towards the New Glasgow’s Farmer Market. Post a picture of
yourself wearing an Art at Night hat or T-shirt with our hashtag, #ngaan20, and
you will be entered. We will be doing deliveries of shirts and hats if anyone
is interested Saturday morning. They can contact us on Facebook or by email, ng.artatnight@gmail.com, if they are interested in buying!”


Gladys May Carganilla takes a photo of some of the art available at Art At Night on Saturday night.

(Brimicombe photo)

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Go Figure: We sketch a picture of BC's private fine art world – BCBusiness

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Van

Credit: Vancouver Art Gallery

At 1.1%, B.C. has the highest concentration of artists per capita in Canada

$24,304 – Median annual salary for a B.C. painter, sculptor or visual artist in 2016

337 – B.C. galleries, studios and cooperatives listed in the Galleries West database

Metro Vancouver/Whistler corridor: 178

Victoria, Island and Sunshine Coast: 89

Interior: 59

North: 11

Share that are public: 65%

400,000 sq. ft. – Estimated loss of artist studio space in Vancouver over the past decade due to residential and commercial conversion or redevelopment

$22.80/sq. ft. – Median reported annual rent for artist studio space in the City of Vancouver, not including taxes or triple-net lease

$17.65/sq. ft. – Average rent for industrial space

US$67.4 billion – Value of the global art market in 2018

Leading countries by market share:

U.S.: 44%

U.K.: 21%

China: 19%

In 2019, British Columbians imported $29,328,878 worth of original paintings, drawings and pastels from 47 countries

Exports: $23,663,131

83% of exports by value went to the U.S.

4 Canadians made the 2019 ArtNews Top 200 global art collectors list:

3 work in real estate

1 (Bob Rennie) is from B.C.

The Rennie Collection includes about 2,100 works by 370 artists

Purchase price of the first piece of artwork Bob Rennie bought (a Norman Rockwell print, in 1974): US$375

Purchase price of Untitled (Red, Black, Green) by Kerry James Marshall, which Rennie bought in 2011-12: US$26 million

B.C.’s highest-grossing art auction, which took place in Vancouver in 2007, totalled $23,033,925 in sales

Highest-priced painting by a B.C. artist sold by Vancouver-founded Heffel Fine Art Auction House: The Crazy Stair (The Crooked Staircase) by Emily Carr, selling for $3,393,000 in 2016

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Mysterious ancient rock art may have been made with beeswax – Science Magazine

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L. M. Brady

This 500-year-old rock art is among the rarest in the world. Found at a site called Yilbilinji near northern Australia’s Gulf of Carpentaria—and depicting a humanlike figure holding a boomerang (right), surrounded by more boomerangs—it’s a type of stenciling that involved creating miniature outlines of humans, tools, and other shapes. Similar, much older mini-stencils have been found elsewhere in Australia and around the world. Now, scientists think they know how ancient people made them.

Australia’s Aboriginal populations have been creating rock art for at least 44,000 years. Typically when stenciling, the artist held their hand or other object up to the rock and sprayed pigmented liquid onto it, leaving behind a life-size negative on the wall.

But the red-rock overhang at Yilbilinji features much smaller figures: 17 minihumans, boomerangs, and geometric patterns—all too tiny to have been modeled after a painter’s hand or a real object. One of the new study’s co-authors remembered seeing Aboriginal people using beeswax as a kind of clay for making children’s toys resembling cattle and horses. Might the ancient rock artists have used beeswax to form stencils?

Working with representatives of the local Indigenous Marra people, the researchers attempted to replicate the ancient art using only materials native to the region. By heating and molding beeswax, sticking it to the rock, and spraying it with a white-pigment paint, they managed to produce rock art exceptionally similar to the originals found at Yilbilinji, they report today in Antiquity.

The miniature art may have served a spiritual or ritualistic purpose, the researchers note. Or, they suggest, because many of these stencils are positioned relatively low on the rocky overhang, it may have just been child’s play, the ancient equivalent to children scribbling on the walls.

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Art for art's sake – Patrick Weiss, Canmore mail carrier – The Crag and Canyon

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Patrick Weiss delivers the mail to a community mail box on a rain day in Canmore. photo by Pam Doyle/www.pamdoylephoto.com

jpg, BA

Patrick Weiss is a front line worker in Canmore.

Weiss is a Rural and Suburban Mail Carrier with Canada Post and he has been working since the Covid-19 virus was first detected.

“Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night stops the mail from being delivered,” Weiss said.

You could also add ‘virus’ to his statement.

Weiss delivers to the communities of the Peaks of Grassi, Mineside, Homesteads and Prospect Point. People depend on their mail even more than before the virus disrupted normal routines.

“I’ve definitely been much busier during the pandemic,” Weiss said. “My parcel delivery is up almost 40 percent for this time of year increasing the workload to Christmas-like volume. This is probably due to all the online ordering of goods during the lockdown.”

Working through the -30 C cold snaps of the last few winters has been challenging though, he said.

The thought of taking a break from work now because of the coronavirus hasn’t crossed his mind.

“I’m not worried about the virus or getting sick due to the low numbers in the Bow Valley,” Weiss said. “And being equipped with the proper PPE and taking all necessary precautions.”

He is outside for most of his workday and happy to be there, he said.

“I love this job as it lets me be outside getting exercise and interacting with the community,” Weiss said. “I’ve been doing it for almost two years.”

The community has been appreciative that he is still on the job.

“People have been awesome to me during this time,” Weiss said. “Very thankful and supportive that we are still delivering their letter mail and packages during a time when they have limited access to the town and its services.”

The community mailboxes can fit a wide variety of parcels, he said.

“What does not fit I gladly hand deliver to customers’ doors to ensure they receive their goods,” Weiss said.

It’s been business as usual with not much downtime at the job. And the typical stereotype of dogs versus mail carriers does not apply, he said.

“I love cats and dogs and I am always happy to have interaction with them while working,” Weiss said. “Never had any bad experiences with them.”

When he isn’t working, he skateboards, snowboards, mountain bikes and tries to keep up with his cross fit workouts, despite the gym being closed for the time being, Weiss said.

“I started skateboarding in the early 70’s skateboard boom and rode my board to school in Calgary at elementary, junior high, and high school,” Weiss said. “I recall getting chased by teachers down the hallways while riding it back in my younger years. Carving and grinding the bowls in Canmore and Banff is a passion of mine that will never die. Both parks are killer and open now and I hit them whenever I have the time and weather permits. I’ve made countless friends skating at them over the years.”

Weiss carries the nickname Snaketrick, because of the boa constrictor cowboy boots he wore in high school. But he doesn’t mind if you call him that.

“I feel very fortunate to live and work in Canmore as it lets me pursue all the outdoor sports that I love,” Weiss said.

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