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Art Cervi, Windsor's Bozo The Clown, dead at 86 – CBC.ca

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Tributes are pouring in following the death of Art Cervi, who played Bozo the Clown on TV in Windsor and Detroit.

Art Cervi was the star Bozo’s Big Top. He died in Novi, Mich., at the age of 86.

The show aired on CKLW-TV in the 60s and 70s, and later from Detroit. It was broadcast live from the building that is now home to CBC Windsor.

Bozo was a franchise and many cities had their own character. 

Cervi, however, was the best of them all, said longtime Windsor broadcaster and announcer for the show Marty Adler on CBC Radio’s Windsor Morning.

“He really understood the kids. You know what — the kids were kings,” he said.

News of Cervi’s death prompted an outpouring of memories and condolences on social media.

The Facebook group “If You Grew Up In Windsor, ON You Remember…” had more than 100 comments on a post about Cervi’s passing.

Many remembered meeting Cervi, appearing on the show, and the joy he brought to them as Bozo.

“Just keep laughin’… Thank you Art Cervi for all the smiles and fun you provided to so many of us throughout Windsor [and] Detroit,” John Fairley said on Twitter.

Cervi’s life and career were the subject of a book called I Did What? that was published in 2014.

“Bozo got his personality from the person behind the makeup, and that’s what made our Bozo special to Detroit and Windsor audiences,” author Herb Mentzer wrote in the introduction.

“He was an enormous success in both cities and to this day, the mention of his name brings a smile and usually ‘I was on his show!'”

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The Vancouver Heritage Foundation needs some art for their Wall – Vancouver Is Awesome

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The Wall, a wall of the CBC Vancouver Plaza, is in need of some new art.

Not because the art there is old, but because every year the art changes. Run by the Vancouver Heritage Foundation (VHF), the Wall currently shows The Giant Hand and the Birth of Gianthropology, by Henri Robideau, but its time is coming to an end.

We are now accepting proposals for the 2021 The WALL installation. Artists and independent curators are invited to submit proposals for consideration by the 2021 WALL committee,” states the foundation on the VHF website.

The curated space goes back to 2009, when the CBC was redesigning their building.

“2020 marked the 10-year anniversary of The WALL! This outdoor installation has featured artworks of both upcoming and established artists, exploring the theme of Vancouver’s built environment,” writes the VHF.

The 43′ x 32′ frame is above, and sponsored by, JJ Bean. 

The deadline for proposals from artists is coming up on March 15.

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STU student brings awareness to ecological crisis through art – The Aquinian

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Grace Hickey, a third-year St. Thomas University student, used the symbolism of the labyrinth to create an opportunity for reflection and self-awareness surrounding the ecological crisis. (Submitted: Madeline Harquail)

Grace Hickey, a third-year St. Thomas University student, put out a call to the Fredericton arts community for environmental pieces for an installation.

Hickey is organizing the installation as a part of her fine arts course at STU and her work with the Canadian Wilderness Stewardship Program. 

The project is inspired by Hickey’s former studies on labyrinths. She said a labyrinth is an ancient symbol that relates to wholeness, combining the imagery of the circle and a spiral into a meandering but purposeful path. Hickey said she’s using the labyrinth as a medium of how the installation will be displayed made of painter’s tape to take the viewer on a journey of reflection.

“The labyrinth represents a journey to our own center, and back again out into the world,” said Hickey.

The installation will be presented from April 6 to 10 in room 203 in Margaret McCain Hall with specific viewing times to be announced. The art submission deadline is at the end of March. Hickey said that she hopes the project will bring a new level of awareness and reflection to its viewers. 

Grace Hickey, a third-year St. Thomas University student, put out a call to the Fredericton arts community for environmental pieces for an installation. (Submitted: Grace Hickey)

Hickey planned on using this symbolism of the labyrinth to create an opportunity for reflection and self-awareness surrounding the ecological crisis. 

“[The artwork is] going to be purposely placed throughout the space and the labyrinth to allow the public participants to come and walk the labyrinth and have a contemplated moment with each piece,” said Hickey.

Because of the request for environmental art, Hickey said that she has received an “overwhelming” amount of support from the community. She said she has collected a variety of pieces in a number of mediums including paintings, sculptures and poetry. 

Hickey said her intention behind using multiple mediums is that she wants to hear stories about individual experiences and the environmental crisis.

“My hope is that people will have time to reflect on their own personal stories and experiences and be able to take this forward as part of our collective solution,” said Hickey. 

Grace Hickey said her intention behind using multiple mediums is that she wants to hear stories about individual experiences and the environmental crisis. (Submitted: Lila Gorey-McSorley)

The cause is important to Hickey as an environmental studies major. Though she explained that while she had always been passionate about social justice issues, she hadn’t even been aware that environmental studies was an offered program at STU. 

Hickey said that her introduction to environmental studies course in first-year was a “profound experience” and the more she learned, the more she wanted to dig deeper.

“I don’t think I’ve fully comprehended the fact that we were currently in an ecological crisis and a climate crisis and what that meant,” said Hickey. 

“I felt that it was important for me to absorb all this knowledge so that I could best effect change in whatever way I can, whether that be creating an art installation, or whether that be later on in my career.”

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Yukon kids express gratitude for nature, pets and friends in art campaign – Yukon News

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Yukon wilderness, pets, sports, video games, friends and family.

Those are a few of the things that local children are grateful for, expressed through an art campaign by Paolo Gallina, Liberal MLA for Porter Creek Centre.

“The situation that we’re all in, responding to the pandemic, and having to stay safe, I know that changes in our lives have had an impact on all of us,” Gallina said.

“I’m a father of young children, and I see how they’ve been impacted, and I know that children in the territory have been impacted.”

Gallina told the News he has focused on gratitude with his own family as a way of managing the stress of the pandemic.

He extended that focus to all children in a Gratitude Campaign last month. He called on Yukon children aged 12 and under to submit a “fun, colourful drawing of something they are thankful for.”

He received more than 50 submissions from children highlighting the good things in their lives.

“What stood out for me was the connection to what makes Yukon unique — our access to the outdoors, connection to the land, and connection to being out on the land with your family and friends, and the animals that we live with and share our home with,” he said.

Gallina received classroom submissions from Jack Hulland and Holy Family elementary schools, as well as several pieces from individual families.

Five winning pieces of artwork were recently selected. The winners will receive an art pack, a donation of $30 to the charity of their choice and 25 blank cards featuring their designs.

Gallina plans to display the winning artwork on bus bench advertisements, social media posts and greeting cards to Porter Creek constituents.

The cards to constituents will include a list of supports for people during the pandemic, including sources for business, mental health and vaccine information.

The five winning pieces include a playground scene by Stella Maris Burns, 10, expressing gratitude for playing with friends and spending time with them at school. Benjamin Carre, 7, expressed gratitude for nature in a sunset mountainscape. Luke said he is grateful for wildlife with a mountainscape framed by sunshine and a river. Mikhail submitted a colourful tree with a family holding hands under a rainbow. Faith submitted a drawing of a child underneath two hearts, saying she is “thankful for everyone.”

Gallina said he hopes the gratitude campaign was helpful to kids during a challenging time.

“I think it helps reinforce with people what is important to them, what they are thankful for, and to find some ways to be happy, content, to feel good as we all are in a changing world,” he said.

After the art campaign, Gallina travelled to Jack Hulland Elementary School to speak with a Grade 1 class about traversing a pandemic world.

“We had a conversation about how things are different and what that means, what it means to be safe,” he said.

The children discussed safe spacing and mask-wearing. Inspired by the conversation, many children chose to wear their masks at their desks, Gallina said.

“It was pretty cool to see children feel comfortable with safety measures that are new to them, to a degree. I think it was nice for them to feel comfortable,” he said.

“I think it was nice for them to have someone come in and show them that, hey, things have changed, but things are okay. We talked about what some of the children had written about — wilderness and family and friends.”

Contact Gabrielle Plonka at gabrielle.plonka@yukon-news.com

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Submitted
Ten-year-old Stella Maris Burns showcases her gratitude for friends and spending time with them on the playground.
Ten-year-old Stella Maris Burns showcases her gratitude for friends and spending time with them on the playground. (Submitted)

Submitted
Ten-year-old Stella Maris Burns showcases her gratitude for friends and spending time with them on the playground.
Ten-year-old Stella Maris Burns showcases her gratitude for friends and spending time with them on the playground. (Submitted)

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