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Art Fx #28: "summer solstice" by Laura Adamiak – Huntsville Doppler

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Art Fx is a year-long series on Huntsville Doppler featuring Huntsville-area visual artists.

“summer solstice” by Laura Adamiak is a woven-fabric wall hanging created with tye dye fabric from Moon Over Water and gifted, thrifted threads from family, suspended from beaver wood foraged from the forest near her home.

“I was inspired to create this piece with the image of explosive creation and sunshine, that the summer brings both life and light back into our world,” says Laura.

Laura’s wall hangings are typically made out of wood, fabric, leather, yarn, and other forest finds. “The wood comes from our daily adventures in our 30-acre forest; these are pieces of tree that have fallen to land or have been enjoyed and left behind by a nomadic beaver friend.” 

For the fabric, “one of my main sources are the end cuts from Moon Over Water and other local makers such as Muskoka Tye Dye. It’s wonderful to be able to repurpose and support other local makers who express a similar creative passion,” says Laura. “The yarn, thread, leather, and other materials are all either thrifted, gifted, or repurposed. There are no new materials used in the making of my art, as I aim to repurpose the little bits of fabric and thread into beautiful creations.”

“summer solstice” is currently available for purchase at Sustain Eco Store in Huntsville for $60.

About the artist

My name is Laura Adamiak and I live in beautiful Huntsville with my husband and young son in our log home we built ourselves a few years back. I spend my days tucked in the woods where I unschool our son and create one-of-a-kind artwork.  

I create both art, song, and poetry and share these offerings through my “falling to land” profile on Instagram and at Sustain Eco Store in Huntsville.

I handstich, slow stitch fabric and textile as a means of meditation, to quiet the mind and to offer myself a gentle place to rest my day and express myself creatively.

See more local art in Doppler’s Art Fx series here.

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Oak Bay sets aside $27,000 for Indigenous art at muncipal hall – Saanich News

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Oak Bay’s newly renovated chambers will feature a new piece of public art commissioned from an Indigenous artist.

The district allocated one per cent of the budget for the hall renovation, $7,000 to public art. Combined with the annual public art allocation, the district has $27,000 to spend on a work for municipal hall.

The move to work with a local artist, specifically from the Lekwungen speaking people on whose land Oak Bay sits, was unanimous among council members.

“This is a rare opportunity to have the resources to do that and as the renovated municipal hall reopens, have that be one of the centrepieces,” Coun. Andrew Appleton said during council discussions July 12.

Still in the earliest of stages, conversation surrounded the how of the project.

Oak Bay is between arts laureates, but liaison Coun. Hazel Braithwaite said the public arts committee is taking on that leadership role.

READ ALSO: Oak Bay artist leaves land to Victoria Native Friendship Centre

Coun. Tara Ney lamented the district’s lack of policy or set protocol for engaging in such initiatives.

She voiced a need to create pathways for engaging so it’s not done piecemeal, and instead with confidence and in culturally appropriate way.

Mayor Kevin Murdoch, who is routinely in conversation with local First Nations leadership, said the district is doing well in the absence of policy, always seeking guidance and building relationships in small ways.

Council agreed working toward something more formal is something they could pursue.

“This does require more formality and we need to start to establish those connections so we’re consistent and so we’re completely aware and sensitive to their needs,” Coun. Cairine Green said.

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READ ALSO: Greater Victoria residents invited to blessing of Indigenous mural celebrating solidarity

c.vanreeuwyk@blackpress.ca


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‘Lynn Valley LOVE’: artist collaborates with public to remember victims of stabbing tragedy – News 1130

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NORTH VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) — Earlier this year, the tightly knit North Vancouver community was shaken after a stabbing claimed the life of one woman and injured six others.

One local woman says, since the incident, the community has had its security threatened, which is why she is behind the newly unveiled art project “to bring some love and positivity back into that space.”

Modern quilter, Berene Campbell, has worked on projects across the country and world, but her latest artwork “Lynn Valley LOVE Project,” was sparked by the tragedy right outside her home.

“This one was just down the road from my home. So for some reason, it just felt like I had to respond to that since I’ve done it for other communities. And now there was a tragedy in my own community. I felt like I needed to do something.”

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So, Campbell went to work, collaborating with residents in the community and people across the country.

Today, if you walk into the Lynn Valley Library, you’ll be greeted with quilted panels spelling ‘LOVE’ “hung there to represent the general community to bring love back into that space.”

Banners made by hundreds are hung over the library stairwell.

“People do it to give back to the community to make them feel good [and] it’s also very healing for the participants to be creative and to make something beautiful and also to be a part of the bigger whole project and to feel a part of the community. So when you see that many people participating, it’s amazing.”

And Campbell says the turnout of participates was unexpected but incredible adding, she couldn’t have done it on her own.

“There’s something incredibly powerful about bringing multiple people together, and the healing of collective energy is much more powerful than one person making all of that work themselves on their own.

“There’s something just amazing about people working together for the greater good.”

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VIDEO: Greater Victoria master carver says Indigenous art a way to restore culture – Oak Bay News – Oak Bay News

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For internationally recognized master carver and lifelong artist, Temosen (Charles) Elliott, his art is a way of communicating with the public that First Nations Peoples are restoring their culture, once lost to colonialism.

A member of the T’sartlip First Nation, Elliott’s works are cherished in collections worldwide.

As a child he practiced art in many forms and when he attended T’sartlip Indian Day School, he won a drawing contest meant to advocate for awareness around tuberculosis.

It was through carving small pieces and drawing daily that he knew art would be a part of his life forever.

“Every evening in our family home, I’d wait until dishes were done and I’d sit down after dinner and draw and draw,” Elliott recalled.

ALSO READ: Indigenous woman issues demands for residential school records in meeting with Royal B.C. Museum

His work can today be found at the University of Victoria, the Saanich Peninsula Hospital, Butchart Gardens and many more places across B.C. and in private collections worldwide.

“When you’re doing the artwork, you’re just putting the words to images,” he said, explaining that his work stands as a silent ambassador for First Nations Peoples.

Elliott has also mentored many emerging artists, including his own children and grandchildren who he said will carry on Indigenous artistry as part of their family legacy.

“I want younger First Nations Peoples to pick it up and do it, because it’s like speaking your language and holding your culture in place,” he said. “Don’t be discouraged; if you are, keep going because there are teachers around like myself who want to share their knowledge.”


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