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Art ‘gallery’ remains open during pandemic – The North Bay Nugget

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Arlie Hoffman has 21 pieces on display in the Kennedy Building at 222 McIntyre Street W.
Mackenzie Casalino


Mackenzie Casalino, Local Journalism Initiative

Art is needed now more than ever, according to Dermot Wilson.

And while art galleries and museums remain closed during the COVID-19 pandemic, artist Arlie Hoffman’s Respect: Work/Place exhibit is still open to the public.

Hoffman’s 21-piece collection is on display in a hallway in the Kennedy Building at 222 McIntyre St. W.

“You may come there not for the art. You may just come there to visit your dentist or your accountant and then the art affects you in a different way,” says Wilson.

“It’s not just the culture vultures . . . who see it. It’s everybody who comes in and we found that has been a wonderful breath of fresh air for people.”

Hoffman’s exhibit includes both oils and watercolours. His work is a part of a series called Respect: Work/Place that focuses on everyday life and workplace details that should be appreciated, says Wilson, executive director of the Nipissing Region Cultural Collective.

“You’re going to be reliving some very positive memories from your own life and you may end up actually purchasing a piece of art that will be with you for the rest of your life and no one else on the planet will have.”

Respect: Work/Place is also a part of a series of mobile galleries that travel around non-gallery spaces around North Bay.

The hallway gallery helps keep the non-typical gallery open for the public during COVID-19 while following social distancing protocols.

“The hallway gallery is different because it’s a flow-through space,” Wilson says.

“It’s one in which you come there to see the art, but you’re also moving from, say, one exit to another. You’re not congregating.”

It’s coincidental, he says, that the space is inside a building that remains open during COVID-19, making Hoffman’s exhibit one of the few art spaces still open to the public.

Wilson says seeing the gallery and space in person is a way to experience art during COVID-19. He says physically being in the space gives you another experience than just viewing them online.

“Culture is very important because culture is a changing thing,” says Wilson. “I think seeing what’s coming out of the COVID-19 experience is that we are up for a change; we know things have to change . . . I think art helps with that, especially because it allows us to think and change and innovate and imagine a better society in the future.”

The exhibit will remain open until the beginning of August.

A video walkthrough is available online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0Mjz-ugs8o&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR1veKI6IdDw6zBSxCnWFb5Lx-_lXVExwJKR2p0TdKVW52cshYLwbmCojyo

For more information on the exhibit, visit https://www.facebook.com/events/737472110328197/

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'Gerryfest' to celebrate Gerry Atwell's music and art, but also his advocacy against systemic racism – CBC.ca

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A festival celebrating the life of the late Gerry Atwell is taking place in Winnipeg next month — but the night will be about more than just music and art.

Atwell, a Juno Award-winning musician known for playing the keyboard for the Winnipeg band Eagle and Hawk, died after suffering a heart attack in late November 2019.

Family and friends knew they would celebrate his life with a music festival this summer. But with people in North America demanding change once again, a key part of the daylong festival will be focused toward the fight against systemic racism — a cause Atwell long advocated for.

“We’re all missing his humanity when it comes to these types of issues,” said Judy Williams, Atwell’s sister.

“He always had a different message for the different audiences he might have been speaking with,” she said, and were he alive now, he would say “something profound, but something that would be inclusive, whether he was going to encourage someone to take some action, or think of other people.”

Atwell also would see the positive opportunities that will come through the conversations being had, added Louise May, executive director of the St. Norbert Arts Centre, where she worked with Atwell for about 25 years.

“Even though it’s coming from such negativity and such a negative event, there is so much hope through it, and so much burgeoning awareness, and ability to talk about it and ability for people to confront themselves with it,” said May.

On Black History Month, musician Joe Curtis celebrates the memory of Gerry Atwell and his mother Frances, who was one of the first black pharmacists in Manitoba. 2:25

“It’s a very, very hopeful time and I know Gerry would be pushing us to see that hope and to really manifest it.”

Gerryfest will take place on Aug. 14 — Atwell’s birthday — at the St. Norbert Arts Centre. Both Williams and May said they felt his presence during the process of organizing the event.

“Even the term ‘Gerryfest’ was Gerry’s idea,” said May. “It was something that we talked about many times, kind of in a joking way. But I knew he always wanted to really do it, which was to have a day when all of his bands played back-to-back-to-back-to-back.

“To which I always said, ‘Gerry, what, you’re going to play for seven, eight hours in one row?'” she said. “That was going to be the very best day that he could imagine for himself.”

Although Atwell won’t be there in person, his presence will be there through former bandmates and other lives he touched, May said.

The planning of Gerryfest started before the COVID-19 pandemic hit Manitoba. So the original plan of a weekend festival has been whittled down to an afternoon and evening of music and art dedicated to Atwell.

If he were still alive today, Atwell’s sister says he would be joining the fight against systemic racism, using words that are profound but also inclusive. (Submitted by Carla Williams)

“I really think we can just keep his work alive and keep building on it year after year with this,” said May, adding that this will be the first of an annual festival.

The festival will also raise funds for the Gerry Atwell Memorial Mentorship Fund, an endowment fund that will have musicians and artists mentoring young people, just like Atwell once did, said Williams.

An invitation is needed to attend the event at the St. Norbert Arts Centre, but people can tune in through livestreams online, said May.

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Window shopping: Whyte Avenue Art Walk shifts from sidewalks to storefronts for 25th anniversary – Edmonton Journal

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Article content continued

“More than ever, it’s important for people to continue supporting artists,” said Zhelisko, who also teaches art classes at The Paint Spot. “I’ve had to put more effort into social media and promoting my work online, but I think the pandemic has shown people what’s really important. I’ve had some commissions from people who want portraits of family members or friends as a way to recognize them.”

First-time Art Walk participant Shelly Banks also works at The Paint Spot and specializes in oil, producing vivid nature and wildlife images that will be featured in the shop’s storefront.

“I’ve always been into art, but working at The Paint Spot and spending so much time around artists encouraged me to give it a try,” said Banks, regarding her decision to take up painting five years ago, producing watercolour, acrylic and coloured pencil art before settling on oil as her preferred method.

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Penticton Art Gallery hosts first Bob Ross exhibit in Canada – Globalnews.ca

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It’s the first time Bob Ross’ happy little exhibit has crossed the border to Canada, and it’s nestled itself right in the South Okanagan at the Penticton Art Gallery.

“There is something magical when you see them in the flesh. There is a greater level of skill than maybe you would believe when see them on TV,” said Paul Crawford, Penticton Art Gallery curator, of the exhibit.

Bob Ross’ TV show, which taught viewers how to paint with soothing words of encouragement and first aired 37 years ago, is seeing a resurgence in popularity online.

Read more:
Allegations of racist game in B.C. hospitals unfairly painting all medical staff, says Kelowna ER nurse

During the lockdown, people have been making the most out of their downtime by picking up paintbrushes and are learning how to ’embrace happy little accidents.’

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The exhibit pulls back the curtain on a little TV magic by revealing that there were actually three versions of each Bob Ross painting.

Read more:
‘Grandmother of Canadian Indigenous Art’ honoured at Kelowna Art Gallery

“He’d have that first painting that no one would ever see, then there was the one he would do live half an hour on TV before your eyes,” said Crawford.

“Then he would do a third version which they would do if they missed a shot or for close-ups during the live taping.”

As Bob Ross said, “The secret to doing anything is believing you can do it.”

The exhibit will be open until Sept. 13.






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‘It’s given me dreams that come to life’: Penticton artist uses studio as creative community hub


‘It’s given me dreams that come to life’: Penticton artist uses studio as creative community hub

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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