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Art museum accused of racism names 1st director of inclusion – Assiniboia Times

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Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, one of the most prestigious art institutions in the world, has appointed its first director of belonging and inclusion — the latest in a series of efforts to make amends for allegations of racism.

The museum on Thursday named Rosa Rodriguez-Williams to the senior post, saying she “will play a critical role in delivering on the MFA’s promise to be a museum for all of Boston.”

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In 2019, the MFA was accused of racism after Black middle school students said they were harangued and mistreated on a class trip by other museum patrons and a staff member who allegedly told the children: “No food, no drink and no watermelon.”

Director Matthew Teitelbaum publicly apologized, banned two visitors, launched an internal investigation and hired a law firm led by a former state attorney general to conduct an independent review.

“Rosa’s deep experience and passion for equity and inclusion will be invaluable as we continue our important work in ensuring a true sense of belonging at the MFA,” he said in a statement.

The MFA, which is marking its 150th year in 2020, welcomed 1.2 million visitors from around the world each year before the coronavirus pandemic forced it to close in March.

One of America’s oldest and most prestigious museums, the MFA is home to half a million prominent works. It has been confronting its blind spots since two dozen seventh-graders, all students of colour from the Helen Y. Davis Leadership Academy in Boston’s Dorchester neighbourhood, suffered taunts during a May 2019 visit.

“This moment in time in our country reinforces the powerful opportunity that the MFA has to heal,” said Makeeba McCreary, the museum’s chief of learning and community engagement, who spent much of the past year holding roundtable discussions on inclusion and racial diversity.

Rodriguez-Williams, a Puerto Rico native, previously directed the Latinx Student Cultural Center at Northeastern University, promoting the recruitment, retention and development of Latinx and Latin American students.

She said Thursday she’s “honoured and excited … to be part of an institution that acknowledges its struggle with inclusion.”

“The MFA is rising up to the present moment with a desire to reimagine and reinvent itself with the goal of achieving an inclusive experience that represents the beauty of the diversity represented in every neighbourhood in this city,” she said.

Earlier this year, the museum created a $500,000 fund devoted to promoting diversity as part of an agreement with the state of Massachusetts in the aftermath of the allegations.

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Window art contest in Prince Albert – paNOW

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“When the lockdown first happened, we were seeing lots of communities decorating their windows and doing cool things like that to make it a little less dreary and sad that we were all locked up inside,” Wirtz said.

Winners of the contest will be announced on Sept. 30 in two different categories. There will be a business category with the winner receiving $50 gift cards to Sandra’s Framing Gallery as well to a local restaurant. The residential category winner will receive $50 gift cards to a local restaurant and to On the Avenue Artisans Gallery. Submissions will be judged by the amount of likes a post receives.

“We saw some communities that made it up into little contests and got lots of people to decorate their windows,” Wirtz said. “Then we thought Culture Days would be a great opportunity to roll that out since it’s raising awareness for arts and culture.”

According to Wirtz, the idea is a great way for everyone to show off their artistic talents.

“Even if they don’t want to come to in-person events yet, you can still decorate your window at home,” Wirtz said.

Those who do not feel comfortable going to an art gallery just yet, can still enjoy the beauty of art, by walking around their neighborhood and looking at the projects being done by those in their community.

“I would love to see more businesses get involved, I think that would be really cool,” Wirtz said. “I would love to drive around and see one that is decorated.”

Artists who are stuck on inspiration can head to the Culture Days Facebook page for tips, tricks, and DIY window paint and chalk recipes.

Meanwhile the City of Prince Albert is also looking for a local artist to paint a mural on the exterior wall of the Prairie Cannabis building on Second Avenue W.

In another Culture Days public art initiative, the boulder at the downtown transfer station will also be painted.

With files from Alison Sandstrom

Dawson.thompson@jpbg.ca

On Twitter: dawsonthompson8

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TrepanierBaer offers glimpse of the 1980s work of 'Alberta art royalty' Carroll Taylor Lindoe – SaltWire Network

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Inspiration works in mysterious ways.

Roughly two years ago, an art collector contacted Yves Trepanier inquiring about a series of large-scale charcoal drawings by Carroll Taylor Lindoe, an artist his gallery represents. It turns out, the piece of art he was after wasn’t available. But it prompted Trepanier to look at his inventory of Taylor Lindoe’s work at TrepanierBaer. Eventually, a small exhibition was launched in April 2019 to introduce the artist to a new generation of art enthusiasts and collectors.

“People went crazy,” says Trepanier. “It was like ‘Wow, this is great: Carroll is back.’”

Still, few thought that the modest exhibition would prompt Taylor Lindoe to start creating again, including the artist herself. She had been retired from both teaching and her artistic practice since the early 2000s, when she moved with her husband to Denman Island off the coast of Vancouver Island.

On the phone with Postmedia earlier this week, the 72-year-old artist is taking a rare break from the fall harvesting of fruit and vegetables on her island home, where she has lived a somewhat reclusive life since 2003. She built a studio on the property not long after moving there, but over the years it had mostly been used for storage.

“This sort of life that we have here is something that I’ve always wanted,” Taylor Lindoe says. “It wasn’t that I was running away from my art practice so much as going to something that was close to my heart. But while I left my practice behind, it didn’t take much for the interest to open up that door into my mind again and get my mind thinking about art again and about the pleasure of making it.”

Taylor Lindoe, whose practice includes drawing, sculpture and painting, will not reveal specific details about what she has been creating this past year. Nor will Calgarians get a chance to see new pieces as part of Carroll Taylor Lindoe: Inch, Foot, Yard, Mile, her first solo show in two decades that runs until Oct. 10 at the TrepanierBaer. The works on display are mostly from the 1980s, a wildly productive period for the artist that found her immersed in a number of disciplines. That allowed her an eclectic approach, demonstrating a great sense of “geometry, architecture and abstraction with allusions to figure and landscape,” Trepanier says.

It’s a reminder of the place of prominence the artist held in Calgary’s art scene, which made her sudden disappearance from it nearly two decades ago all the more jarring, he says. Her family roots go back to early pioneers of Alberta and the pioneering western Canadian culture has always been “very much a part of my being,” she says. Her parents were also pioneers of sorts. Her father Luke Lindoe was a prominent ceramic artist, painter, sculptor and businessman. Her mother Vivian Lindoe was also a painter, printmaker and ceramist. The couple became part of a small, tight-knit group of post-war artists practising in Calgary.

“The artist’s community in the ’40s and ’50s was very much a pioneering community,” Taylor Lindoe says. “It was a small group of people. They were all very tied together, they all knew each other. There were no artist-run galleries until the 1970s. People showed where they could. Really it was a social group.”

Taylor Lindoe eventually studied at the Alberta College of Art and Design and taught there until she moved to B.C., inspiring generations of Calgary artists. She was married to Ron Moppett, a prominent Calgary painter. Their son, Damian, is also an artist currently living in Vancouver. In short, she is a part of “Alberta art royalty,” Trepanier says.

The exhibit at TrepanierBaer, while focused on a relatively brief period in Taylor Lindoe’s 40-year-career, showcases her versatility in sculpture, painting and drawings. They include everything from the 16-work Image Poem, a collection of ink on mylar and watercolour pieces inspired by an eye-opening trip to Macedonia in the 1980s, to Figure in Landscape with Black Stairs, a painted wood sculpture inspired by her walks through Calgary, to Untitled #4, a 1987 abstract charcoal drawing.

“She was moving around from one medium to another and was ahead of her time,” says Trepanier. “If you think back to how artists were 20, 30 years ago, if you were a painter you were a painter. You might fool around with something else, make some drawings or prints, but she really moved and there’s a cross-disciplinary interest, a flexibility in her work approach. It’s just the way she is. I think she gets bored if she just does one thing and plateaus there. She wants to get off and go onto the next thing.”

As for her next thing, Taylor Lindoe does not reveal too many details. This is not because she is being secretive, but because she has a hard time planning or predicting what will happen.

“It’s coming from the subconscious,” she says. “That part of a person is not very directable … There will always be a sense of place and there will always be a physicality and there will be a psychic reality to it. So whatever it is, however it gathers in on the work I’m doing, whether it’s drawing or paintings or sculptures, those elements will always be there.”

Carroll Taylor Lindoe: Inch, Foot, Yard, Mile runs until Oct. 11 at TrepanierBaer. Visit trepanierbaer.com

Copyright Postmedia Network Inc., 2020

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TrepanierBaer offers glimpse of the 1980s work of 'Alberta art royalty' Carroll Taylor Lindoe – Calgary Herald

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Article content continued

Carroll Taylor Lindoe's Image Poems on exhibit at TrepanierBear Gallery.
Carroll Taylor Lindoe’s Image Poems on exhibit at TrepanierBear Gallery. jpg

On the phone with Postmedia earlier this week, the 72-year-old artist is taking a rare break from the fall harvesting of fruit and vegetables on her island home, where she has lived a somewhat reclusive life since 2003. She built a studio on the property not long after moving there, but over the years it had mostly been used for storage.

“This sort of life that we have here is something that I’ve always wanted,” Taylor Lindoe says. “It wasn’t that I was running away from my art practice so much as going to something that was close to my heart. But while I left my practice behind, it didn’t take much for the interest to open up that door into my mind again and get my mind thinking about art again and about the pleasure of making it.”

Taylor Lindoe, whose practice includes drawing, sculpture and painting, will not reveal specific details about what she has been creating this past year. Nor will Calgarians get a chance to see new pieces as part of Carroll Taylor Lindoe: Inch, Foot, Yard, Mile, her first solo show in two decades that runs until Oct. 10 at the TrepanierBaer. The works on display are mostly from the 1980s, a wildly productive period for the artist that found her immersed in a number of disciplines. That allowed her an eclectic approach, demonstrating a great sense of “geometry, architecture and abstraction with allusions to figure and landscape,” Trepanier says.

Carroll Taylor Lindoe's Figure in Landscape, Black Stairs show on display at TrepanierBaer Gallery.
Carroll Taylor Lindoe’s Figure in Landscape, Black Stairs show on display at TrepanierBaer Gallery. jpg

It’s a reminder of the place of prominence the artist held in Calgary’s art scene, which made her sudden disappearance from it nearly two decades ago all the more jarring, he says. Her family roots go back to early pioneers of Alberta and the pioneering western Canadian culture has always been “very much a part of my being,” she says. Her parents were also pioneers of sorts. Her father Luke Lindoe was a prominent ceramic artist, painter, sculptor and businessman. Her mother Vivian Lindoe was also a painter, printmaker and ceramist. The couple became part of a small, tight-knit group of post-war artists practising in Calgary.

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