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ArtCity: Art at a crossroads – Woodstock Sentinel Review

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The word “crossroads” has many definitions.

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The word “crossroads” has many definitions. Literally, it is the intersection of two or more streets, roads or paths. As a figure of speech, a crossroads is a point at which a crucial decision must be made. It can also be symbolic, often representing a place where two realms meet in mythology and folklore.

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The last two years in particular have led to many crossroads as people around the world have faced a global pandemic, elections, growing social justice movements and personal upheaval.

It’s also a fitting theme for the 14th annual Grand National Fibre Art Exhibition, which is currently on view in Woodstock as part of a national tour.

The Grand National Fibre Art Exhibition was developed in 2003 to showcase the work of Canadian quilt artists. In 2019, the exhibition was expanded to include other types of fibre artwork. This year marks another major milestone as the exhibition travels across the country for the first time.

It was this crossroads decision that inspired the exhibition’s titular theme, explained Jaynie Himsl, a member of the Grand National Exhibition Association board.

“Since the title and entries for the exhibition are both national in scope, the committee wanted to bring the exhibition closer to all Canadians,” Himsl said.

“Two years ago was the first time the exhibition had been shown in Western Canada. This year, we’re very excited to have the exhibition travelling to venues all across Canada during its two-year time span.”

The exhibition features a diverse selection of 48 fibre art pieces by 43 artists.

“It’s always interesting to see how artists interpret the theme in so many ways — from life-changing events like birth, marriage, divorce, death, relocating, to COVID-19 and sickness, or the choices one makes. Our changing environment, faith and literal depictions of crossings are all represented,” Himsl said.

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The artwork also showcases a variety of fibre art materials, styles and techniques, such as hooked paper, 3D sculptural work, digital manipulation, beading, dyeing, weaving, embroidery and printing.

This year’s exhibition was juried by award-winning artists Tracey Aubin, Debora Barlow and Judy Villett.

“This exhibition also has a judged component,” added Himsl. “Once all the selected juried artworks arrive at the opening venue the judges have an opportunity to view the works in person and select the seven pieces for an award. This year with all its disruptions, it was uncertain till the last moment whether the judges were going to be allowed into the facility to actually view the work.”

Despite the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, Himsl says the tour has been a success so far. A virtual opening was hosted by the University of New Brunswick Art Centre this spring and was well-attended by viewers from across the country.

The Woodstock leg of the tour runs until Feb. 26, 2022, and is hosted by the Woodstock Art Gallery in partnership with the Woodstock Museum National Historic Site.

The exhibition is scheduled to continue its journey west in 2022, with stops at the Victoria Arts Council Gallery in British Columbia and The Weyburn Arts Council in Saskatchewan and the Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba.

Plans for the next exhibition in 2023 and 2024 are already underway as well, with the titular theme Delights.

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In the meantime, visitors can explore Crossroads: 2021 Grand National Fibre Art Exhibition at the Woodstock Museum, located at 466 Dundas St. The museum is open Tuesday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

The Woodstock Art Gallery will also be holding a virtual artist talk in partnership with the Fine Art program at Fanshawe College on Feb. 10, 2022, at 3 p.m. Details can be found online at www.woodstockartgallery.ca .

Robin De Angelis is the cultural communications co-ordinator at the Woodstock Art Gallery. She also splits her time at the Woodstock Museum National Historic Site.

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Cultivating Creativity: Celebrating the 'Art of Craft' – Belleville Intelligencer

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Quinte Arts Council

Craft comes in all forms: fibre, wood, pottery, glass, metal, paper and more.

From the 13th century onwards, practitioners were traditionally associated with a Guild, the decline of which corresponded with the Industrial Revolution and mass production. Craft as an ideology came about during the 19th century British Arts and Craft movement as an antithesis to modernity.

According to the Washington, DC-based James Renwick Alliance for Craft, “Craft is a particular approach to making with a strong connection to materials, skill and process. Art is most traditionally thought of as drawing or painting that is a visual depiction of a personal expression.”

The trouble starts with questions around the relative value or hierarchy of that which is utilized (craft) to that which is admired (art).

For our most recent Umbrella magazine, the Quinte Arts Council dedicated the winter issue to celebrating the Art of Craft and how the lines between the two often blur in innovative and exciting ways.

We profiled 12 Quinte-based craftspeople who express their art through their craft.

The first is blacksmith Amy Liden, of Liden Forge in Picton, Ont.: Think of any medieval movie with swords and there’s most likely to be a blacksmith; often a hulking sweaty man pounding away on an anvil. Based on representation in popular culture, it would seem blacksmithing is a male-only profession. It’s not.

While women smiths are a minority, the Holkham Bible of the 1300s includes an illustration of a woman forging a nail. And this year, 30 percent of students in the Artist Blacksmith program at the Haliburton School of Art and Design are women – the same program Amy graduated from in 2016.

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Liden’s background is in fine art, graduating from OCADU in 2013 with a major in Sculpture and Installation. It was there she discovered metal as a sculpting medium. “I love how malleable metal can be,” says Amy. “I love being able to manipulate such a structural and rigid material just by changing its temperature. I think its versatility allows me to challenge myself creatively to push the limits of what has traditionally been done with blacksmithing and fabrication.”

After Haliburton, Amy moved to “The County” to apprentice with local master blacksmith Bruce Milan at Island Forge.

“I was drawn to pursue blacksmithing as a career after working with Bruce,” she says. “He showed me how to work with clients and how to apply my creativity to projects to support myself financially. Blacksmithing is steeped in history: the first evidence of smithing dates back to 1350 BC in Egypt.”

In her practice Amy strives to incorporate traditional blacksmithing techniques and design principles into her work.

“I love utilizing the forge itself to apply heat to the steel, using the anvil and hammer to forge scrolls and a variety of shapes, and the leg vise to bend and twist bars,” she says. “ I think it’s these skills that help me stand out in the community of metal fabricators.”

Amy opened her Picton-based Liden Forge last May and has been focused on commission-based custom work. And while she feels incredibly supported by her community, she recognizes she is still an anomaly:

“As a young woman blacksmith, I’ve been faced with doubt in my capabilities, but I feel like that has also driven me to keep pushing myself. I’m constantly trying to expand my knowledge so that I grow with each project and can keep taking on bigger and better projects.”

The Winter 2021 issue of Umbrella magazine is out now.

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Halifax councillors to consider smaller $3 million contribution to new Art Gallery of Nova Scotia – Halifax Examiner

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Episode 63 of The Tideline, with Tara Thorne, is published.

Josh MacDonald is a veteran of stage and screen, familiar to Halifax audiences through films and shows like Diggstown, Spinster, Little Grey Bubbles, and Sex & Violence. As a screenwriter his works include the horror film The Corridor and the coming-of-age story Faith, Fraud and Minimum Wage, which was based on his play Halo. He’s got his playwright’s hat on when he visits the show this week to discuss #IAmTheCheese, his adaptation of Robert Cormier’s 1977 bestseller. On January 30, he’ll discuss its evolution along with the show’s director, Ann-Marie Kerr, as part of Eastern Front Theatre’s Early Stages Festival.

Listen to the full episode here.

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Cornwall Hive's Art 4 All event hopes to grow – Standard Freeholder

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It might have been virtual, but the first ever Art 4 All still yielded some good results on Saturday.

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The event, organized by the Cornwall Art Hive, aimed at getting the local artistic community together to discuss the craft, create connections and of course, create. Initially, it was to be hosted at the Cornwall Square mall, but health and safety restrictions meant that it had to take place over Zoom.

Despite a smaller turnout that anticipated, Richard Salem, executive director of Your Arts Council of Cornwall and the SDG Counties (YAC), is hopeful that future Art 4 All events can be held in person.

“We felt that rather than not have anything that this would be better than nothing,” he said. “We are trying to keep the events as consistent as possible. We want to have one every month and hopefully by next month, the third Saturday, at Cornwall Square, we will have an event in person.”

In all, three local artists too part in the event — Salem, Yafa Goawily, and Liv Bigtree.

“Right now I have work showing at the Brooklyn collective which is a gallery space in North Carolina,” said Bigtree, 19. “Right now, I’m not really doing much, art-wise. I’ve been taking it easy, taking a little break.

“I like to do that when I’m not really working on big projects, I just come back to this space where I just have fun.”

  1. The Your Arts Council of Cornwall and SDG unveiled a new logo in collaboration with the Cornwall Art Hive at its general meeting on Tuesday, June 22, 2021 over Zoom. Handout/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network

    Your Arts Council struggled in pandemic, but excited for the year ahead

  2. The old Bank of Montreal building on Pitt Street on Friday July 6, 2018 in Cornwall, Ont. The building will soon become Cornwall's new arts centre.
Lois Ann Baker/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network

    YAC interested in running Cornwall’s arts centre

Goawily, which produces a wide range of visual arts, said creating art has always been relieving. She also explained that although the pandemic has created some issues for artists, it has had the effect of growing the local art movement.

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“We are growing not just with events and support, we are growing because we can reach different people – that is our main goal,” she said. “The community knows now that we are open for them.”

“Art is so important not just for artists but for everyone,” said Bigtree. “You don’t have to have specific skills. I really think that everyone is an artist. I think that it’s part of what makes us humans.

“Art is about freedom and that is what art hive is trying to create.”

Even with the pandemic, the Cornwall Art Hive and YAC still managed to host well-attended events in the summer, in Lamoureux Park. According to Salem, the happenings attracted residents from all walks of life and grew fast in popularity.

“Of course that it’s sad (pandemic restrictions), but I think that we learned to support each other more,” said Goawily. “I was new to Cornwall and did my first solo exhibition here. I find that yes, we are tiny but we are mighty. We are growing fast and we support each other truly.”

“We started buying art from each other and we had some groups going sharing what we had accomplished. We are stronger together.”

Anyone interested in gaining insight on the local art community can do so through a variety of videos uploaded to the Your Arts Council Youtube channel .

Fracine@postmedia.com

twitter.com/FrancisRacine

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