Connect with us

Art

Arts and culture aplenty in downtown Chilliwack – Chilliwack Progress

Published

 on


There’s plenty to see around downtown Chilliwack right now when it comes to arts and culture.

At least five different exhibitions have opened in recent weeks featuring works by self-taught artists, an up-and-coming painter, a light sculpture artist and an exhibit on loan from the Royal BC Museum.

Lucas Simpson • Chilliwack painter Lucas Simpson’s solo exhibition is on display in the O’Connor Group Art Gallery at the Chilliwack Cultural Centre from Feb. 8 to March 19. He describes his work as “fragmented impressionism: fragmented in regards to form, but impressionist in regards to richness in colour, essence and atmosphere.” Gallery hours are Monday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free.

READ MORE: ‘I’m here to bring a little more colour to this crazy COVID world right now,’ says Lucas Simpson

Cabin by Lucas Simpson. (Lucas Simpson)

Cabin by Lucas Simpson. (Lucas Simpson)

——————-

Sylvie Roussel-Jannsens • Local light sculpture artist, Sylvie Roussel-Janssens, has two installations on display from now until March 15. Gratitude will be in the lobby of the Royal Hotel while Towers is in the front windows of the Chilliwack Cultural Centre. Both installations are visible day and night.

READ MORE: Chilliwack venues aglow with light sculptures by Roussel-Janssens

‘Gratitude’ by Sylvie Roussel-Janssens is on display in the lobby of the Royal Hotel now until March 15. (Sylvie Roussel-Janssens)

‘Gratitude’ by Sylvie Roussel-Janssens is on display in the lobby of the Royal Hotel now until March 15. (Sylvie Roussel-Janssens)

——————-

Trina Schols (Art on Main) • Trina Schols’ artwork is on display as part of Art on Main, an exhibition people can view as they walk past the windows of Royal Hotel on Main Street. She is a self-taught painter and, as an avid gardener, her work often reflects this hobby with roses, sunflowers and peonies often the subject of her paintings.

READ MORE: ‘Overwhelming’ response for Art on Main, first artist’s work now on display at Chilliwack hotel

Self-taught Chilliwack painter, Trina Schols, will have her artwork on display in Royal Hotel windows throughout the month of February. (Submitted)

Self-taught Chilliwack painter, Trina Schols, will have her artwork on display in Royal Hotel windows throughout the month of February. (Submitted)

——————-

Anita Symonds • Cultus Lake painter, Anita Symonds, is the featured artist at Cornerstone Custom Picture Framing on Mill Street until March 31. She has been painting for 50 years and the landscapes displayed in the exhibition are inspired by the natural beauty that surrounds us and they showcase her love of brilliant colour.

READ MORE: Anita Symonds’ work adds colour to walls in downtown Chilliwack gallery

Anita Symonds’s artwork is on display at Cornerstone Custom Picture Framing at 9369-A Mill St. from Feb. 1 to March 31. (Anita Symonds)

Anita Symonds’s artwork is on display at Cornerstone Custom Picture Framing at 9369-A Mill St. from Feb. 1 to March 31. (Anita Symonds)

——————-

Our Living Languages • Interactive exhibition, Our Living Languages, highlights the state of Indigenous languages in British Columbia. Through interactive stations, video and audio, it provides visitors with the opportunity to learn more about the history of 34 disrupted First Nations languages in B.C., the complexity of these languages, and what people and communities are doing to help their languages survive and flourish. Our Living Languages has been produced and is on loan from the Royal BC Museum in Victoria. It’s on display at the Chilliwack Museum now until May 24.

READ MORE: History of 34 disrupted First Nations languages highlighted in exhibition at Chilliwack Museum

Sydney Laiss (left), curatorial assistant, and curator Anna Irwin stand in the ‘Our Living Languages’ exhibition on Friday, Feb. 5, 2021. It is currently on display at the Chilliwack Museum and on loan from the Royal BC Museum. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)

Sydney Laiss (left), curatorial assistant, and curator Anna Irwin stand in the ‘Our Living Languages’ exhibition on Friday, Feb. 5, 2021. It is currently on display at the Chilliwack Museum and on loan from the Royal BC Museum. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)


 

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on?
Email: jenna.hauck@theprogress.com
Twitter: @PhotoJennalism

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Artart exhibitArts and culture

Get local stories you won’t find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Peterborough artists Brian Nichols and John Marris facilitate community art making during the pandemic – kawarthaNOW.com

Published

 on


Peterborough artists Brian Nichols and John Marris have been facilitating community art making during the pandemic, including for people facing marginalization and alienation. Pictured is artwork at One City Peterborough’s open studio, located at 541 Water Street in Peterborough, which is open on a drop-in basis to community members between 2:30 and 4 p.m. every Monday afternoon. (Photo: Sarah McNeilly / kawarthaNOW.com)

“I am here as an artist,” Brian Nichols emphatically states through his mask, while stopping mid-pace, on both feet, as if to punctuate his statement. “I’m here as a volunteer.”

With a nod, the artist, volunteer, and psychotherapist springs back into action, energetically fluttering about the studio once more.

It’s the first day the drop-in open studio at One City Peterborough has reopened since the most recent provincial-wide lockdown, and the energy in the room is palpable.

Advertisement – story continues below

 

 

The new studio space at One City Peterborough, which first opened in October 2020, is buzzing with excited artistic experimentation. Located at 541 Water Street in Peterborough, the studio is open on a drop-in basis to community members between 2:30 and 4 p.m. every Monday afternoon.

Light pours through the large windows onto colourful works of art displayed on the mantle, tables, and walls. That foreboding sense of dread we’ve all grown so accustomed to can’t help but give way to pure joy inside the small studio.

Were it not for the masked participants partaking in the occasional six-foot-shuffle — that awkward physical-distance dance we’ve all shared with unwitting partners over the past year — one could almost forget, if only for a fleeting moment, that we are living in times of crisis.

A freshly made piece of art at One City Peterborough's open studio.  (Photo: Sarah McNeilly / kawarthaNOW.com)
A freshly made piece of art at One City Peterborough’s open studio. (Photo: Sarah McNeilly / kawarthaNOW.com)

This is not a typical art class. There is no teacher standing at the front of the room imparting their knowledge onto passive recipients. Rather, it’s a non-hierarchical environment where the small group can safely gather to actively make art together, and learn about themselves in the process.

“It feels even more important during COVID,” says Tammy Kuehne, warming room coordinator for One City Peterborough, which is focused on housing, food security, community safety, and inclusion. The organization is an amalgamation of Warming Room Community Ministries and Peterborough Reintegration Services.

“The need for spaces where people can connect with each other in person, still being safe, is crucial,” Kuehne adds. “We’ve had a lot of people really excited to learn that we’re opening back up.”

Advertisement – story continues below

 

 

Now more than ever we all need community self-expression and creativity, but for those who have faced marginalization and alienation — mental health challenges, homelessness, illness, disability, and poverty — community art making represents a vital lifeline during the isolating conditions of the pandemic.

Throughout the pandemic, both Nichols and fellow local artist John Marris have been hard at work finding ways to deliver the community arts programming they facilitate, respectively, with various not-for-profits.

Prior to the most recent lockdown, Nichols had been facilitating the open studio at One City Peterborough for Circles of Support & Accountability (CoSA) — a restorative justice program — since October.

Prior to the most recent lockdown, Peterborough artist Brian Nichols had been facilitating the open studio at One City Peterborough for Circles of Support & Accountability (CoSA), a restorative justice program.  Pictured is some of the CoSA artwork at the One City Peterborough open studio. (Photo: Sarah McNeilly / kawarthaNOW.com)
Prior to the most recent lockdown, Peterborough artist Brian Nichols had been facilitating the open studio at One City Peterborough for Circles of Support & Accountability (CoSA), a restorative justice program. Pictured is some of the CoSA artwork at the One City Peterborough open studio. (Photo: Sarah McNeilly / kawarthaNOW.com)

Throughout most of the winter lockdown, Marris has been offering art-making sessions for young residents in a bubbled household at YES Shelter for Youth and Families. He also managed to offer outdoor art-making sessions with YES in the summertime.

Peterborough artist John Marris has been offering art-making sessions for young residents at YES Shelter for Youth and Families.(Photo: John Marris / Facebook)
Peterborough artist John Marris has been offering art-making sessions for young residents at YES Shelter for Youth and Families.(Photo: John Marris / Facebook)

In January, Marris and local artist Wendy Trusler moved online the community art making workshops they had been running with mental health patients at Peterborugh Regional Health Centre so they could safely continue their important work.

This past fall, Marris and Nichols were also able to continue the ‘You Can Make It Art’ workshops at The Mount Community Centre, though only for residents of the centre. Previously, the workshops had been available on a drop-in basis to the broader Peterborough community, after Nichols launched the program in 2018.

Marris and Nichols have made it their mission to provide those facing marginalization with something the artists believe to be as vital as food, shelter, water, and air.

Art is neither a luxury nor a pursuit reserved only for the cult of the expert. Self-expression is an integral part of being human.

“These community art projects take us back to the fundamental need to express ourselves and explore ourselves in healthy and productive ways,” Marris writes for a presentation he recently delivered before the Arts, Culture Heritage Advisory Committee for The City of Peterborough.

“They help us develop skills and confidence and self-belief. They teach us how to be present, to find focus, and to know we have the right to express ourselves — to be the authors of our world.”

Advertisement – story continues below

 

 

For both Nichols and Marris the impetus to create, and to encourage others to do so, is anchored in the two artists’ introspective and philosophical investigations of presence, respectively.

“I need to find things that take me into that moment of presence,” explains Marris during a telephone interview. “What I’ve discovered is that making art, working with play, and making art with other people has become this way to be absolutely present in the moment.”

As for Nichols, his background in psychotherapy certainly contributes to his approach to community art-making. Most participants with whom he works have experienced grief or trauma in some form. However, his process is also born from a place of vulnerability and empathy from his own experiences.

In 2018, The Mount Community Centre hosted 'You Can Make It Art' drop-in art making workshops for the general community. The workshops resumed this past fall, but only for residents of the centre. (Photo: John Marris)
In 2018, The Mount Community Centre hosted ‘You Can Make It Art’ drop-in art making workshops for the general community. The workshops resumed this past fall, but only for residents of the centre. (Photo: John Marris)

In 2018, after a diagnosis of giant cell arteritis (a rare autoimmune disease) forced Nichols to leave his psychotherapy practice, he felt a sense of urgency to make art and to encourage community art-making. Since then, his artistic output has been as prolific as his community art-making initiatives.

“It’s been an incredible journey to figure out how to do the work,” Nicols says. “And it’s really subtle and easy, but difficult to grasp, how it’s not teaching, how it’s not simply making art — it’s about connection.”

“What is present is a new pain and the absence, for me, is often hope and a sense of future,” he replies when asked how presence and absence figure into his process. “To help others embrace the new pain, without trying to minimize it — we’re not just the pain but that’s hugely a part of our existence — without moving to hope and without any sense of future. What we have is now — being in the now — which is that sense of presence.”

Advertisement – story continues below

 

 

Art making is, in many ways, world making. There exists an essential connection between the real and the imagined. An artist’s created world is necessarily separate from, yet connected to, the world in which we live.

“I think living is that whole process of world making,” Nichols acknowledges. “To live authentically is to create both your own interior and exterior world.”

Through art, Marris and Nichols offer people not only the opportunity to be the creators of their own worlds, but also to create an inclusive and even emancipatory community of art makers, connected by their shared presence in the present.

 Community art making at The Mount Community Centre. (Photo: John Marris)
Community art making at The Mount Community Centre. (Photo: John Marris)

As such, their practices — art making, world making, and the gift of presence — transform the One City Peterborough studio into a sanctuary for all.

To support the important work Nichols and Marris are doing in the Peterborough community, you can make a donation to One City Peterborough at www.onecityptbo.ca/donate or to YES Shelter for Youth and Families at yesshelter.ca/help/help-yes/donate.

Atelier Ludmila Gallery, in the Commerce Building at 129-1/2 Hunter Street West in downtown Peterborough, will be exhibiting Marris’ most recent body of work, Material Dialogue. The show opens on the First Friday Art Crawl on March 5th from 6 to 10 p.m. It will be exhibited until Sunday, March 28th. Fifty per cent of all sales from the show will be donated to YES Shelter for Youth and Families.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

The Vancouver Heritage Foundation needs some art for their Wall – Vancouver Is Awesome

Published

 on


The Wall, a wall of the CBC Vancouver Plaza, is in need of some new art.

Not because the art there is old, but because every year the art changes. Run by the Vancouver Heritage Foundation (VHF), the Wall currently shows The Giant Hand and the Birth of Gianthropology, by Henri Robideau, but its time is coming to an end.

We are now accepting proposals for the 2021 The WALL installation. Artists and independent curators are invited to submit proposals for consideration by the 2021 WALL committee,” states the foundation on the VHF website.

The curated space goes back to 2009, when the CBC was redesigning their building.

“2020 marked the 10-year anniversary of The WALL! This outdoor installation has featured artworks of both upcoming and established artists, exploring the theme of Vancouver’s built environment,” writes the VHF.

The 43′ x 32′ frame is above, and sponsored by, JJ Bean. 

The deadline for proposals from artists is coming up on March 15.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

STU student brings awareness to ecological crisis through art – The Aquinian

Published

 on



Grace Hickey, a third-year St. Thomas University student, used the symbolism of the labyrinth to create an opportunity for reflection and self-awareness surrounding the ecological crisis. (Submitted: Madeline Harquail)

Grace Hickey, a third-year St. Thomas University student, put out a call to the Fredericton arts community for environmental pieces for an installation.

Hickey is organizing the installation as a part of her fine arts course at STU and her work with the Canadian Wilderness Stewardship Program. 

The project is inspired by Hickey’s former studies on labyrinths. She said a labyrinth is an ancient symbol that relates to wholeness, combining the imagery of the circle and a spiral into a meandering but purposeful path. Hickey said she’s using the labyrinth as a medium of how the installation will be displayed made of painter’s tape to take the viewer on a journey of reflection.

“The labyrinth represents a journey to our own center, and back again out into the world,” said Hickey.

The installation will be presented from April 6 to 10 in room 203 in Margaret McCain Hall with specific viewing times to be announced. The art submission deadline is at the end of March. Hickey said that she hopes the project will bring a new level of awareness and reflection to its viewers. 

Grace Hickey, a third-year St. Thomas University student, put out a call to the Fredericton arts community for environmental pieces for an installation. (Submitted: Grace Hickey)

Hickey planned on using this symbolism of the labyrinth to create an opportunity for reflection and self-awareness surrounding the ecological crisis. 

“[The artwork is] going to be purposely placed throughout the space and the labyrinth to allow the public participants to come and walk the labyrinth and have a contemplated moment with each piece,” said Hickey.

Because of the request for environmental art, Hickey said that she has received an “overwhelming” amount of support from the community. She said she has collected a variety of pieces in a number of mediums including paintings, sculptures and poetry. 

Hickey said her intention behind using multiple mediums is that she wants to hear stories about individual experiences and the environmental crisis.

“My hope is that people will have time to reflect on their own personal stories and experiences and be able to take this forward as part of our collective solution,” said Hickey. 

Grace Hickey said her intention behind using multiple mediums is that she wants to hear stories about individual experiences and the environmental crisis. (Submitted: Lila Gorey-McSorley)

The cause is important to Hickey as an environmental studies major. Though she explained that while she had always been passionate about social justice issues, she hadn’t even been aware that environmental studies was an offered program at STU. 

Hickey said that her introduction to environmental studies course in first-year was a “profound experience” and the more she learned, the more she wanted to dig deeper.

“I don’t think I’ve fully comprehended the fact that we were currently in an ecological crisis and a climate crisis and what that meant,” said Hickey. 

“I felt that it was important for me to absorb all this knowledge so that I could best effect change in whatever way I can, whether that be creating an art installation, or whether that be later on in my career.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending