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ARTS AROUND: New exhibit at the Rollin Art Centre captures moments through children’s eyes – Alberni Valley News

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MELISSA MARTIN

SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

A new exhibit opens at the Rollin Art Centre on April 27, and it features art by Alberni Valley children.

The exhibit is titled Moments in Time, looking through the world through our children’s eyes. the show is a collaboration of children’s art, ECEBC Port Alberni Branch/ Connections.

Help us celebrate Child Care Month in May at the Rollin Art Centre. Join us in the gallery for refreshments on Saturday, April 30, from 1-3 p.m. This exhibit runs until May 20.

WATERCOLOUR WONDER

Ionne McCauley of Qualicum Beach has drawn and made art most of her life. She spent 20 years in Australia and Canada custom-dyeing fabrics and garments, teaching colour theory and design principle classes to fibre artists. Also a quilter, she has written a number of books and is known for her skill at quiltmaking.

She has taught colour workshops for more than 25 years. She will teach a two-day workshop at the Rollin Art Centre June 1–2 on Watercolour: the Basics of Colour Theory and Pigments. The workshop runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.

The fee for this workshop is $150. A supply kit fee of $20 (paid to the instructor) includes all paints used in class, paper to start and a grayscale. Register at Rollin Art Centre by calling 250-724-3412 or visiting the gallery Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

WHAT IS SPRING TO YOU?

The Rollin Art Centre will be holding a unique Spring-inspired art exhibit, May 25–June 18.

We are inviting local artists to submit up to three pieces (size depending), that depicts your rendition of spring imagery. All mediums welcome: Acrylic, oil, watercolour, pottery, sculpture, jewelry, photography etc.

Titled “SPRING -Seasonal Imagery,” this exhibit is supposed to reflect the gentle changes of the season; create a unique mood and feeling associated with this season. Application forms are available at the Rollin Art Centre. Artists may submit up to three pieces; $10.00 per submission. Deadline to apply is April 30.

SOLSTICE FEST SEEKS ARTISTS

Solstice Arts Festival is back, after a two- year hiatus due to COVID-19. We are looking for artists to bring their talent and wares to the Rollin Art Centre on Saturday, June 18 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Spaces are still available outdoors on our terrace or in our two gardens. There is ample room to spread out, and the gardens are ideal for setting up an easel or demonstrations of artwork.

Let’s make this a huge community event, enticing everyone to come out to our free annual arts festival.

If you are interested in displaying at this year’s event, call the Rollin Art Centre 250-724-3412, for more info. Spaces $25.

Melissa Martin is the arts administrator for the Community Arts Council.

Alberni ValleyArts and EntertainmentPort Alberni

An undated watercolour paint palette, painted in watercolour by instructor Ionne McCauley. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)

An undated watercolour paint palette, painted in watercolour by instructor Ionne McCauley. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)

Steller’s Jays, a watercolour on paper instructor Ionne McCauley created in 2021. McCauley will be teaching a watercolour workshop in Port Alberni. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)

Steller’s Jays, a watercolour on paper instructor Ionne McCauley created in 2021. McCauley will be teaching a watercolour workshop in Port Alberni. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)

Ionne McCauley has made art for most of her life. Since 2016 she has concentrated on watercolours. McCauley will be teaching a watercolour workshop in Port Alberni. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)

Ionne McCauley has made art for most of her life. Since 2016 she has concentrated on watercolours. McCauley will be teaching a watercolour workshop in Port Alberni. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)

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Art exhibition putting spotlight on Indigenous women's voices – Regina Leader Post

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Curator Melanie Monique Rose wants be “uplifting and amplifying” Indigenous women’s voices by telling their stories through art.

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Regina-based artist Melanie Monique Rose uses Saskatchewan’s native plants to dye the fibers she uses in her artwork, a deeply personal nod to her experience as an Indigenous artist connected to the land on which she lives.

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“I take these plants, like goldenrod, and create colour with them to dye my wool that I use,” said Rose. “All the colours I have there have been taken from Treaty Four territory, for my needle felting.”

Rose is both artist and curator of the exhibition titled ᑌᐸᑯᐦ or Tepakohp, which means “seven” in Cree, a multi-media exhibition of works from seven Saskatchewan artists that uses art to share their experiences as Indigenous women.

The unique collection is set to debut at the Cathedral Village Arts Festival next week, before it begins an extended tour across the province with the Organization of Saskatchewan Arts Councils.

ᑌᐸᑯᐦ includes artwork from Audie Murray, Larissa Kitchemonia, Stacey Fayant and Brandy Jones, among others, who each contributed several pieces, each of which represents their lived experiences in a way that examines connections with the land.

Rose envisioned the exhibition because she wanted to place the experiences of Indigenous women on centre stage, as traditionally theirs are voices that have been stifled.

“It’s really all about uplifting and amplifying,” said Rose. “I wanted the artists to think about something that’s important to them, that they want to share through their art.”

What resulted is a series of very personal pieces, she said, that touch on topics ranging from experiencing Indigenous motherhood to discovering identity, grappling with grief and navigating injustices.

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A striking self-portrait by artist Marcy Friesen tells the story of her reaching comfortableness with her Welsh and Cree heritage; a piece from Donna Langhorne examines her journey of reconnecting with her Anishinaabe roots after being adopted by a white family as a child.

“A lot of the works are really speaking to connection and reconnection,” said Rose. “It’s quite contemporary, but definitely you can see how it’s rooted in tradition.”

Melanie Monique Rose, curator of a multi-media art installation titled ᑌᐸᑯᐦ, or Tepakohp, makes a willow wreath for the show at her home on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 in Regina.
Melanie Monique Rose, curator of a multi-media art installation titled ᑌᐸᑯᐦ, or Tepakohp, makes a willow wreath for the show at her home on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 in Regina. Photo by KAYLE NEIS /Regina Leader-Post

For Rose, the overarching goal is to educate the audience on the experience of being Indigenous in the current climate.

“We know we have a major problem here in Canada, with missing and murdered Indigenous women and negative stereotypes that just aren’t true,” said Rose. “I really wanted to use my gifts as an artist as a form of activism.”

Rose is enthusiastic to be partnered with both OSAC and the festival to show ᑌᐸᑯᐦ, to reach audiences across the province. OSAC’s tour will take the physical exhibition to Prince Albert, Estevan, Indian Head and more over the next two years.

But the show’s Regina debut will be at the upcoming arts festival in Cathedral, which begins on Monday. ᑌᐸᑯᐦ will be on continual display throughout the week, on the digital billboard located at Westminster United Church.

It will be the first time the festival has hosted an art installation in this way, said chair Marilyn Turnley, and the nature will allow for hopefully more reach than a typical display inside a venue.

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“It offers an opportunity for people on bikes, walking, driving by to see it up close and personal,” said Turnley.

Turnley said the festival is excited to be the first look at the collection.

“Diversity and inclusiveness has always been at the forefront of the festival,” said Turnley. “This is how we build community — we bring art together in this way.”

A piece by Melanie Monique Rose, curator of a multi-media art installation titled ᑌᐸᑯᐦ or Tepakohp, debuting at the Cathedral Village Arts Festival next week.
A piece by Melanie Monique Rose, curator of a multi-media art installation titled ᑌᐸᑯᐦ or Tepakohp, debuting at the Cathedral Village Arts Festival next week. Photo by KAYLE NEIS /Regina Leader-Post

The artists featured in ᑌᐸᑯᐦ will also be attending personally on the final day, Saturday, to interact with festival-goers and offer original art pieces for purchase — both their own, and from other Indigenous artists.

“It’s about opening that door for other artists,” said Rose. “Creating that space for the next generation, which I think is the whole spirit of the exhibition.”

lkurz@postmedia.com

The news seems to be flying at us faster all the time. From COVID-19 updates to politics and crime and everything in between, it can be hard to keep up. With that in mind, the Regina Leader-Post has created an Afternoon Headlines newsletter that can be delivered daily to your inbox to help make sure you are up to date with the most vital news of the day. Click here to subscribe.

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Local artist chosen as distinguished artist for La Cloche Art Show – Northern Daily News

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Espanola resident Penny Bois says it is an honour and a privilege to have been chosen as one of two distinguished artists for the La Cloche 43rd Art Show. She is also happy to get back to showing her artwork in person as she doesn’t think virtual art shows well. Bois is a member of the Manitoulin Art Club and the Sudbury Art Club.

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The La Cloche Art Show is a juried exhibition and sale, with prizes awarded in a number of categories for those artists exhibiting their artistic creations. The categories are: acrylic, coloured pencil and drawing, mixed media, oil, pastel, photography, sculpture and watercolour. It takes place from July 2 to 9 between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. at the Whitefish Falls Community Centre and is free to the public.

Due to COVID-19 this very popular annual event has not been able to take place for the last two summers. The last time the art show was held in 2019 there were 100 artists registered for the event, coming from all across Canada and even internationally. This year the turnout for both artists and art aficionados are expected to be high.

Bois said she was surprised to have been chosen as a distinguished artists as she has only been focusing on developing her talents over the last six years. She started drawing when she was 12 years old and still has some of the sketches she created when she was 16, but then she put it aside.

“By the time I was 19 I didn’t do any more painting.”

She says she looks back at the old drawings and regrets not continuing.

Life took her in a different direction. Bois laid her pencils and brushes down to begin a career as a cardiac intensive care nurse. It was at least 33 years before her creative urges were once again ignited and now, she is exploring, at her own pace, a new artistic career.

She works in six mediums: charcoal, pastel, oil, graphite, acrylic, and ball point pen. Just recently she discovered gelly roll pens, which come in many different colours and thicknesses. While she has been told it is better to stick with one or two mediums Bois says, “I like to explore many avenues of creativity so I’m not limiting myself to one medium.”

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Her main interest is portraits. She recalls doing a sketch of her family which she was quite proud of only to be told by her eldest daughter, “Whose family is this?” Her husband, children and grandchildren are part of the artwork adorning the walls of her spacious studio.

She has also focused on a lot of commissioned pieces over the last two years and started tutorial art classes in the last year. She prefers to facetime one-on-one with her students which she says range from 14 to people in their 80’s. Since she has health issues she prefers to limit the number of people coming into her studio. She doesn’t charge for her tutorials, since she says as a budding artist she had help from some amazing people and it is her way of passing it on.

Bois has a Facebook page called P. Bois studio, which includes little two-minute lessons in artistic techniques along with the various materials she uses in creating different drawings and paintings. There are a number of things she has learned from trial and error that she passes along.

Two of the key techniques she mentions are layering and knowing the limitations of the various mediums she is using. She says it is impossible to erase ball point pen.

“Once you commit gelly roll pen to paper you are done.”

Also, with white ballpoint pen on black paper a fixative is not needed. For other mediums such as charcoal and graphite a fixative must be sprayed on between layers to be able to continue. The fixative dries within 15 minutes. In creating one of her pieces she says she uses a minimum of seven to eight layers and sometimes as many as 10. The properties of the different grades of paper used also comes into how the finished piece will present itself.

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Some of her favourite corrective tools are white and black mono erasers and a simple make-up brush or Q-tip. For those people who dabble with acrylics, and are slow painters, she recommends an acrylic retardant to keep it from drying too fast. “I’ve learned to pace myself.”

Her tutorials mention as well the types of paints she uses and how she mixes them to get a particular shade.

As part of being the distinguished artist Bois will be conducting a tutorial during the art show as well as donating one of her charcoal sketches for the raffle. The painting to be raffled, called ‘Emotion’, is an 18″ x 17″ white and black charcoal on a double matted wood frame with an anti-glare glass front. It’s valued at $350. She plans on bringing a minimum of 10 to 12 of her creations to exhibit at the show. They will also be available for purchase.

After the La Cloche Art Show the exhibition that Bois will be a part of is the Manitoulin Art Tour, from July 15 to 17. There will be 40 locations all across Manitoulin Island for people to meet the artists and view their creations. Her spot for the three days will be in the basement of the Anchor Inn.

Local artist Penny Bois was happy to show off her artistic creations. One of her favourite pieces is the nude girl above her fireplace, which she created from a photograph. Much of her art starts with photos and then she recreates them using six different mediums.
Local artist Penny Bois was happy to show off her artistic creations. One of her favourite pieces is the nude girl above her fireplace, which she created from a photograph. Much of her art starts with photos and then she recreates them using six different mediums.

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Art auction to benefit Ottawa hospital construction – Ottawa Citizen

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Are you looking for a way to brighten up your walls, support local arts and save lives at the same time? Art for Impact, a creative fundraising auction, allows participants to do just that, a Daily Double of philanthropy that supports new and established Ottawa artists while at the same time helping to get a new hospital built here.

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The auction was the idea of Altis Recruitment co-founder and CEO, Kathryn Tremblay, a longtime champion of Ottawa-area artists who saw the initiative as a way to give back to groups that she has leaned on in the past while honouring the memory of her husband, Toni Guimaraes, who died in September 2016, almost two-and-a-half years after being diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer.

“Toni relied on the hospital a tremendous amount,” says Tremblay. “He was only 49 when he was diagnosed, and we felt very privileged to have such a great team there. And we also felt that wouldn’t it be great to have a fresh new hospital? There is something exciting about this opportunity we all have to live in Ottawa and get this new one off the ground.

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“You look at the Civic Hospital,” she adds. “It’s almost 100 years old and, in light of COVID, in light of the aging population and that cancer touches so many people, what better time to get a new hospital? This is about looking ahead.”

Through Altis’s charitable arm, The Tremblay Guimaraes Family Foundation, and in consultation with three local galleries — Studio Sixty Six, Wall Space and Galerie St. Laurent + Hill — Tremblay purchased works by 21 Ottawa-area artists. Each artist was paid in full, with the galleries each discounting a portion of their commission.

At 8 a.m. on May 24, a weeklong online auction will commence, with all of the proceeds going to The Ottawa Hospital. The minimum bid will be 75 per cent of each piece’s market value.

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“I love art,” says Tremblay. “It’s joyful, and I feel it really changes your space. And on top of that you have this great new hospital being built, and I thought that instead of just giving money, it would be wonderful to elevate these artists and get their names out there, and the person donating can actually have this amazing piece of art that speaks to them while also being part of the hospital elevating things. And on my end, it gives me a chance to honour Toni.”

Among the 21 artists are Sarah Hatton, Dan Sharp, Claudia Gutierrez, Guillermo Trejo, Michael Harrington, Natalie Bruvels, Norman Takeuchi, Florence Yee, Christine Fitzgerald and Michael Schreier. Bidding opens at anywhere from $340 to $3,715, depending on the piece.

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Studio Sixty Six owner Carrie Colton, who curated the auction, says that Ottawa’s arts community and its hospital are similarly near and dear to her, and her desire to help with the initiative goes deeper than simply representing artists. The Ottawa Hospital, she explains, has been her son’s — and thus her — second home for nearly two decades. “He’s in and out of the hospital a lot, and it’s been a key part of my life, and I know it is for a lot of people in Ottawa.

“It’s a very important part of our community, in anyone’s community, and I know how badly this building is needed. So doing this really was a no-brainer.”

The auction, Colton adds, embraces diversity of both the artists’ cultures and their media.

“There’s sculpture, there’s photography, there’s print-making, there’s painting. We really tried to put together a diverse selection of work.”

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Artist Natalie Bruvels’ 48×60” Morning Has Broken painting, which incorporates imagery made by her son during the pandemic, is among the pieces in the auction.

“Celebrating the local arts community and honouring Kathryn’s husband, while looking to the future of the health of everybody in Ottawa is a really nice synthesis of initiatives,” she says.

“Everybody wins,” adds Tremblay. “The buyer wins, the artist wins, the curator wins, the hospital wins. I hope we see more fundraising initiatives like this.”

Visit https://ohfoundation.ca/get-involved/art-for-impact/ for more information.

bdeachman@postmedia.com

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