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Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market Analysis and Forecast Report 2020: Market to Reach $4,405.3 Million by 2030

Dublin, Nov. 16, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market: Analysis and Forecast, 2021-2030” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering. The global advanced balloon catheter market is witnessing a moderate decline in the size of the market due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The overall market was estimated to be $2,523.9 million in FY2019, and it is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6.25% during the forecast period, 2021-2030. Presently, more than 70 companies are operating in this market, including already existing and emerging medical device companies.Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, the global elective surgeries were shutdown, which, in turn, caused the decline of the global advanced balloon catheter market in 2020. However, the impact of the pandemic is anticipated to be short-term, and with the resumption of elective procedures, the global advanced balloon catheter market is projected to recover from 2021.Our healthcare experts are continuously analyzing the impact of the industrial and regulatory decisions on the global advanced balloon catheter market. The market is driven by certain factors, increasing prevalence of cardiovascular and peripheral artery diseases, increasing demand for minimally invasive surgeries, advancements in the balloon catheters, and favorable reimbursement landscape in developed economies.The market is favored by the development of novel drug-coated balloon catheter and multipurpose balloon catheter.Within the research report, the market is segmented based on product type, component, application, patient age, end-user, and regional analysis. Each of these segments covers the market’s snapshot over the projected years, the inclination of the market revenue, underlying patterns, and trends by using analytics on the primary and secondary data obtained.Key Questions Answered in this Report: * How has the COVID-19 pandemic impacted the global advanced balloon catheter market? * What is the adoption rate of the balloon catheters in peripheral artery disease (PAD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) across various regions? * What is the reimbursement landscape for the balloon catheters across various regions? * How does the regulatory landscape for the balloon catheters impact the overall global advanced balloon catheter market? * Who are the key players in the global advanced balloon catheters and their respective market share? * What are the key strategies employed by the companies for entering the market between 2016-June 2020? * What is the patent landscape for the global advanced balloon catheter market? Who are the major market players that have filed for patents between January 2017- August 2020? * How will the entry of products that are in the pipeline till mid-September 2020 impact the global advanced balloon catheter market during the forecast period 2021-2030? * What are the various types of balloon catheters available in the global advanced balloon catheter market? What is their market share in 2019 and 2030, respectively? * Which type of balloon catheter is anticipated to witness the growth with the highest compound annual growth rate (CAGR) during the forecast period 2021-2030? * What are the emerging applications for the balloon catheters? * What are the various components of balloon catheters? Which type of balloon catheter is anticipated to witness significant growth during the forecast period 2021-2030? * How is the global advanced balloon catheter market anticipated to grow in the emerging economies, such as Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East, and Africa?Key Topics Covered: 1 Product Definition2 Scope of Report3 Research Methodology4 Impact of COVID-19 on Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market 4.1 Impact on Patients 4.2 Impact on Adoption Rate of Advanced Balloon Catheters 4.3 Impact on the Growth Rate of the Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market 4.4 Entry Barriers and Opportunities for Companies Entering Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market5 Epidemiology and Reimbursement Landscape for Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market 5.1 Utilization of Balloon Catheters 5.1.1 Coronary Procedures 5.1.2 Peripheral Procedures 5.2 Reimbursement Landscape 5.2.1 The U.S. 5.2.2 Europe6 Industry Analysis 6.1 Industry Structure 6.1.1 Balloon Catheters Manufacturers 6.1.2 Distributors 6.2 Industry Supply Chain Analysis 6.2.1 Raw Material 6.2.2 Impact of COVID-19 on Supply Chain 6.3 Associations and Consortiums 6.4 Regulatory Framework 6.4.1 Regulatory Framework in North America 6.4.1.1 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 6.4.1.2 Health Canada 6.4.2 Regulatory Framework in Europe 6.4.3 Regulatory Framework in Asia-Pacific 6.4.3.1 National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) 6.4.3.2 Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Agency (PMDA) 6.4.3.3 Central Drug Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) 6.5 Patent Analysis 6.5.1 Patent Analysis (by Product) 6.5.2 Patent Analysis (by Country)7 Competitive Landscape 7.1 Market Share Analysis 7.2 Key Developments and Strategies 7.2.1 Regulatory and Legal 7.2.2 Mergers and Acquisitions 7.2.3 Partnerships, Alliances, and Business Expansions 7.2.4 New Offerings 7.2.5 Funding Activities 7.3 Product Pipeline Analysis 7.4 Comparison Between Conventional Balloon Catheters and Advanced Balloon Catheters 7.5 Pricing Analysis8 Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market Sizing and Forecast 8.1 Assumptions and Limitations 8.2 Key Findings and Opportunity Assessment 8.2.1 Key Findings 8.2.2 Opportunity Assessment 8.3 Market Dynamics 8.3.1 Market Drivers 8.3.1.1 Increasing Prevalence of Cardiovascular and Peripheral Artery Diseases 8.3.1.2 Increasing Demand for Minimally Invasive Surgeries 8.3.1.3 Advancements in Balloon Catheters 8.3.1.4 Favorable Reimbursement Landscape in Developed Economies 8.3.2 Market Restraints 8.3.2.1 Risk and Complications Associated with Catherization Procedures 8.3.2.2 High Cost of Angioplasty Procedures 8.3.3 Impact Analysis 8.3.4 Market Opportunities 8.3.4.1 Development of Novel Drug-Coated Balloon Catheters 8.3.4.2 Development of Multipurpose Advanced Balloon Catheter9 Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market (by Product Type) 9.1 Overview 9.2 Normal Balloon Catheter 9.3 Cutting and Scoring Balloon Catheter 9.4 Drug-Coated Balloon Catheter 9.5 Stent Graft Balloon Catheter10 Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market (by Application) 10.1 Overview 10.2 Coronary Procedures 10.3 Peripheral Procedures 10.4 Neurovascular Procedures 10.5 Other Procedures11 Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market (by Component) 11.1 Overview 11.2 Rapid Exchange (Rx) Balloon Catheter 11.3 Over the Wire (OTW) Balloon Catheter 11.4 Fixed Wire Balloon Catheter12 Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market (by Patient Age) 12.1 Overview 12.2 Adult 12.3 Pediatric13 Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market (by End User) 13.1 Overview 13.2 Hospitals and Ambulatory Surgery Centers 13.3 Catheterization Laboratories 13.4 Others14 Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market (by Region)15 Company Profiles 15.1 Company Overview 15.2 Role of Abbott Laboratories in Global Advanced Balloon Catheter Market 15.3 Financials 15.4 Recent Developments 15.5 SWOT Analysis * Abbott Laboratories * B. Braun Melsungen AG * Becton Dickinson and Company * Biotronik AG * Boston Scientific Corporation * Cardinal Health, Inc. * Cardionovum GmbH * Concept Medical Inc. * Cook Group * Hexacath * Koninklijke Philips N.V. * Medtronic plc * MicroPort Scientific Corporation * OrbusNeich Medical * Terumo CorporationFor more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/4h1axf Research and Markets also offers Custom Research services providing focused, comprehensive and tailored research. CONTACT: CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900

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COVID-19 cases will strain Ontario hospitals in December no matter what happens: model – CP24 Toronto's Breaking News

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The number of COVID-19 cases in intensive care at Ontario hospitals will break the 200 bed threshold sometime in early December, severely hampering the healthcare system’s ability to follow through with all scheduled surgical procedures, new provincial modelling data suggests.

Even with slower case growth than what has been observed in recent weeks, Ontario government epidemiologists said Thursday the ICU bed occupancy due to COVID-19 will hit 200 somewhere in the first week of December, and could near 300 in the worst case scenario by the end of that month.

ICU bed occupancy of more than 150 in Ontario challenges the healthcare system’s ability to keep with scheduled surgeries and makes it difficult to complete additional surgeries already delayed once during the first wave of the pandemic.

At that level, hospitals are facing significant capacity challenges – they are facing significant threats to the sustainability of their health human resource workforce and they are making decisions to cancel, delay or postpone treatments that are necessary,” Dr. Adalsteinn Brown of the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health told reporters on Thursday.

The modellers give three scenarios for new case growth going into December.

In one scenario, with one per cent average case growth, Ontario could see more than 2,000 cases per day by the end of December.

At three per cent average case growth, the province could see more than 4,000 cases per day by the end of next month.

At five per cent average case growth, Ontario could see 9,000 cases per day by the end of December.

Ontario’s case growth has been 0.45 per cent per day on average over the past two weeks.

The modellers say “key indicators” of the pandemic have been “flattening” in some regions, but progress is not consistent across the province. 

“It’s best described as a fragile or precarious situation where we would like to see cases continue to flatten or decline before we can say that we are making strong progress,” Brown said.

The doctors who delivered the model said that while the situation remains “precarious,” it is no longer worsening.

Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. David Williams said the situation is at the point where there is no discussion about placing new regions into lockdown.

“We’re not recommending any new ones go into lockdown at this stage,” he said.

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Nav Canada warns air traffic controllers that job cuts are coming as pandemic crushes revenue – CBC.ca

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Air traffic controllers are being warned that layoffs are coming as Nav Canada pursues a “full restructuring” in response to a revenue slump caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, CBC News has learned.

CBC News has obtained a confidential memo sent internally to air traffic controllers on Thursday. In it, Ben Girard, Nav Canada’s vice-president and chief of operations, told staff that the company has seen a $518 million drop in revenue compared to its budget.

He said he’s been pushing the federal government for help, but — unlike some other countries — Canada has not released an industry-specific bailout package yet.

“We anticipate that until air traffic returns to higher levels, which will not occur until the end of this fiscal year, we will continue to operate in a daily cash negative position and this will be made worse as funding from the [Canadian Emergency Wage Subsidy] program is ratcheted back,” Girard wrote. 

Girard did not say in the memo how many air traffic controllers will lose their jobs or which locations will be affected. The memo said it’s looking to reduce the number of “IFR controllers.” These controllers are higher on the pay scale and work at area control centres in Gander, N.L., Moncton, N.B., Montreal, Winnipeg, Toronto, Edmonton and Vancouver.

The workers are responsible for controlling large amounts of airspace between airports using radar. Their job is to make sure planes keep proper distance from one another.

“I know this is very difficult news to hear. It is also very difficult news to deliver,” Girard wrote. “This is a decision that has been made at my level based on what needs to be done to ensure Nav Canada’s financial sustainability.”

Nav Canada manages millions of kilometres of airspace over Canada and used to provide air navigation services for more than three million flights a year. It’s funded through service fees paid by air carriers.

The Canadian Air Traffic Control Association said it is very concerned with the memo. 

“It is the opinion of this union that safety is not being taken into consideration in making sound decisions,” president Doug Best and executive vice-president Scott Loder wrote in a letter to members.

“Safety is the number one priority for Nav Canada and it has somehow taken a backseat to cost containment as the number one and only priority.”

‘We’re facing years of a downturn in air traffic’

In November, Canadian air traffic was down 54 per cent compared with the same time period in 2019, according to the memo.

“Over the summer and fall months, the outlook for the aviation industry has deteriorated significantly and it has become increasingly clear that we’re facing years of a downturn in air traffic that is much larger and broader in scope than we all initially believed, and will be much deeper and longer than any downturn in the history of the industry,” Girard wrote.

Nav Canada says it is conducting studies of air traffic control towers in Whitehorse, Regina, Fort McMurray in Alberta, Prince George in B.C., and Sault Ste. Marie and Windsor in Ontario that “will result in workforce adjustments.” The company is also looking into closing a control tower in St. Jean, Que.

Nav Canada air traffic controllers were told on Thursday that a workforce adjustment is coming because ‘the aviation industry has deteriorated significantly.’ (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

Government ‘pressed’ for help 

The company has been focused on securing liquidity and tapped into the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) to pay up to 75 per cent of employees’ wages, he wrote. Girard added that these payments are being reduced and will run through December, but Nav Canada isn’t sure if it can continue receiving that wage support.

“While an extension for the CEWS program through June 2021 was recently announced, NAV CANADA’s eligibility is uncertain,” he wrote.

Girard said the federal government has so far failed to come up with a bailout package for the airline sector, despite “significant lobbying.”

Last month, the Globe and Mail reported that the federal cabinet is working on a package for the airline sector that would include low-interest loans. 

Since Sept. 22, Girard wrote, the company has cut more than 700 managers and employees — 14 per cent of its workforce. It also let go of 159 students earlier in the pandemic, he added, and in November cut even more, “leaving just a few in the system.”

Along with the cuts, seven air traffic control towers are being considered for a downgraded level of service, and another 25 sites that are already Flight Service Stations — which provide only advisory services — could face more cuts.

Nav Canada’s board of directors has cut its fees by 20 per cent, and executives and managers have dropped their salaries by up to 10 per cent, Girard wrote.

These cost reductions, as well as access to government support through the wage subsidy program, have saved the company $200 million since March 1, he added. 

“However, that number still pales in comparison to the $518 million reduction in revenues as compared to budget,” Girard wrote.

“Despite these cost-containment efforts, we find ourselves in a situation where we expect our revenues to continue falling far short of our costs for several years, and we continue to require further cost-containment measures and indeed, a full restructuring of our business.

“In an environment where 30 per cent of costs are associated with ‘things’ and 70 per cent of costs are associated with ‘people,’ when all possible cuts with ‘things’ have been done, any further cuts will directly affect people.”

Girard added that he hopes the company can bring back some of the laid-off staff once the pandemic passes.

The Canadian Air Traffic Control Association said it will continue to challenge Nav Canada. The union hopes there will be “enough interest” in departure incentives for older controllers to offer them a package to retire. 

“The views of Nav Canada at this point are violating the vision, mission and overarching objectives of this company,” Best and Loder said in their letter to members.

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Nav Canada warns air traffic controllers that job cuts are coming as pandemic crushes revenue – CBC.ca

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Air traffic controllers are being warned that layoffs are coming as Nav Canada pursues a “full restructuring” in response to a revenue slump caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, CBC News has learned.

CBC News has obtained a confidential memo sent internally to air traffic controllers on Thursday. In it, Ben Girard, Nav Canada’s vice-president and chief of operations, told staff that the company has seen a $518 million drop in revenue compared to its budget.

He said he’s been pushing the federal government for help, but — unlike some other countries — Canada has not released an industry-specific bailout package yet.

“We anticipate that until air traffic returns to higher levels, which will not occur until the end of this fiscal year, we will continue to operate in a daily cash negative position and this will be made worse as funding from the [Canadian Emergency Wage Subsidy] program is ratcheted back,” Girard wrote. 

Girard did not say in the memo how many air traffic controllers will lose their jobs or which locations will be affected. The memo said it’s looking to reduce the number of “IFR controllers.” These controllers are higher on the pay scale and work at area control centres in Gander, N.L., Moncton, N.B., Montreal, Winnipeg, Toronto, Edmonton and Vancouver.

The workers are responsible for controlling large amounts of airspace between airports using radar. Their job is to make sure planes keep proper distance from one another.

“I know this is very difficult news to hear. It is also very difficult news to deliver,” Girard wrote. “This is a decision that has been made at my level based on what needs to be done to ensure Nav Canada’s financial sustainability.”

Nav Canada manages millions of kilometres of airspace over Canada and used to provide air navigation services for more than three million flights a year. It’s funded through service fees paid by air carriers.

The Canadian Air Traffic Control Association said it is very concerned with the memo. 

“It is the opinion of this union that safety is not being taken into consideration in making sound decisions,” president Doug Best and executive vice-president Scott Loder wrote in a letter to members.

“Safety is the number one priority for Nav Canada and it has somehow taken a backseat to cost containment as the number one and only priority.”

‘We’re facing years of a downturn in air traffic’

In November, Canadian air traffic was down 54 per cent compared with the same time period in 2019, according to the memo.

“Over the summer and fall months, the outlook for the aviation industry has deteriorated significantly and it has become increasingly clear that we’re facing years of a downturn in air traffic that is much larger and broader in scope than we all initially believed, and will be much deeper and longer than any downturn in the history of the industry,” Girard wrote.

Nav Canada says it is conducting studies of air traffic control towers in Whitehorse, Regina, Fort McMurray in Alberta, Prince George in B.C., and Sault Ste. Marie and Windsor in Ontario that “will result in workforce adjustments.” The company is also looking into closing a control tower in St. Jean, Que.

Nav Canada air traffic controllers were told on Thursday that a workforce adjustment is coming because ‘the aviation industry has deteriorated significantly.’ (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

Government ‘pressed’ for help 

The company has been focused on securing liquidity and tapped into the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) to pay up to 75 per cent of employees’ wages, he wrote. Girard added that these payments are being reduced and will run through December, but Nav Canada isn’t sure if it can continue receiving that wage support.

“While an extension for the CEWS program through June 2021 was recently announced, NAV CANADA’s eligibility is uncertain,” he wrote.

Girard said the federal government has so far failed to come up with a bailout package for the airline sector, despite “significant lobbying.”

Last month, the Globe and Mail reported that the federal cabinet is working on a package for the airline sector that would include low-interest loans. 

Since Sept. 22, Girard wrote, the company has cut more than 700 managers and employees — 14 per cent of its workforce. It also let go of 159 students earlier in the pandemic, he added, and in November cut even more, “leaving just a few in the system.”

Along with the cuts, seven air traffic control towers are being considered for a downgraded level of service, and another 25 sites that are already Flight Service Stations — which provide only advisory services — could face more cuts.

Nav Canada’s board of directors has cut its fees by 20 per cent, and executives and managers have dropped their salaries by up to 10 per cent, Girard wrote.

These cost reductions, as well as access to government support through the wage subsidy program, have saved the company $200 million since March 1, he added. 

“However, that number still pales in comparison to the $518 million reduction in revenues as compared to budget,” Girard wrote.

“Despite these cost-containment efforts, we find ourselves in a situation where we expect our revenues to continue falling far short of our costs for several years, and we continue to require further cost-containment measures and indeed, a full restructuring of our business.

“In an environment where 30 per cent of costs are associated with ‘things’ and 70 per cent of costs are associated with ‘people,’ when all possible cuts with ‘things’ have been done, any further cuts will directly affect people.”

Girard added that he hopes the company can bring back some of the laid-off staff once the pandemic passes.

The Canadian Air Traffic Control Association said it will continue to challenge Nav Canada. The union hopes there will be “enough interest” in departure incentives for older controllers to offer them a package to retire. 

“The views of Nav Canada at this point are violating the vision, mission and overarching objectives of this company,” Best and Loder said in their letter to members.

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