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Asteroid WARNING: Dinosaur-killing asteroid WILL hit Earth again – Express.co.uk

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The asteroid which wiped out the dinosaurs around 66 million years ago was believed to be up to 10 miles wide. While asteroids of that size hitting Earth are extremely rare, another major collision is inevitable. NASA has made great strides in discovering near-Earth objects that are over one kilometre in size, with 90 percent now accounted for.

However, that means there are still 10 percent of dangerous asteroids that have not been spotted.

While the chances of a major asteroid hitting Earth are small – NASA believes there is a one-in-300,000 chance every year that a space rock which could cause regional damage will hit – the devastating prospect is not impossible.

And when it does hit Earth, it could spell the end of humanity.

Physicist Rob van den Berg wrote on Q&A site Quora: “Small asteroids are of course pretty harmless, they evaporate in the atmosphere before they reach the ground.

“If they do reach the ground they don’t do all that much damage (compared to what they can do). Sure, it will cost a lot to repair all the windows, but it’s extremely unlikely to actually get hit by one (as far as I know, only two recorded cases of that in all our history).

“The asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs had a size of about 10 miles and such impacts only happen every several million years (since this particular one was the last, it has been 65 million years now).

“But no matter how small the chance of it happening in our lifetime, it is pretty much destined that another big one will eventually hit Earth again, some time in the future.”

However, NASA has said that a much smaller asteroid still has the ability to cause chaos on the planet.

The space agency said a space rock of just a kilometre wide has the potential to case chaos across the planet.

NASA said: “An individual’s chance of being killed by a meteorite is small, but the risk increases with the size of the impacting comet or asteroid, with the greatest risk associated with global catastrophes resulting from impacts of objects larger than 1 kilometre.”

However, the space agency moved to reassure frightened minds, stating that it is not predicting a major asteroid strike of that size for several centuries.

The space boffins said: “NASA knows of no asteroid or comet currently on a collision course with Earth, so the probability of a major collision is quite small. In fact, as best as we can tell, no large object is likely to strike the Earth any time in the next several hundred years.”

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Let 'er buck: Study suggests horses learn from rodeo experience, grow calmer – CTV Toronto

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CALGARY —
Rodeo fans love the thrill of a bronc exploding into the ring, cowboy temporarily aboard. How the horse feels about it hasn’t been so clear.

Newly published research out of the University of Calgary looks at three years of roughstock events from that city’s Stampede in an attempt to peer inside the mind of an animal about to let ‘er buck.

“I try to understand the animal’s perspective,” said Ed Pajor, a professor of veterinary medicine. “We asked the question whether or not horses find participating in the rodeo to be an adversive experience or not.”

Pajor and his co-authors – Christy Goldhawk from the University of Calgary and well-known animal behaviourist Temple Grandin – studied 116 horses in bareback, novice bareback, saddle bronc and novice saddle bronc events. They looked at animals about to be loaded into a trailer and taken to the ring. They also observed how the horses behaved while in the chute waiting to be unleashed.

Horses have all kinds of ways of showing they’re unhappy, Pajor said. They might move back and forth, chew their lips, swish their tail, defecate, roll their eyes, paw the ground, toss their head, or rear up in protest.

The researchers found that the more people were around them, the more likely the horses were to show unease. That’s probably because they spend most of their time in fields and pastures and aren’t used to the bustle, Pajor said.

The other factor that affected behaviour was experience. If it wasn’t their first rodeo, the horses were much less likely to act up.

“We didn’t see a lot of attempts to escape. We didn’t see a lot of fear-related behaviours at all,” Pajor said. “The animals were pretty calm.

“The animals that had little experience were much more reactive than the animals that had lots of experience.”

There could be different reasons for that, he suggested.

“We don’t know if that’s because they’re used to the situation or whether that’s because of learned helplessness – they realize there’s nothing they can do and just give up.”

Pajor suspects the former.

“When the cowboys came near the horses, they would certainly react and you wouldn’t really see that if it was learned helplessness.”

The researchers also noted that the horses’ bucking performance, as revealed in the score from the rodeo judges, didn’t seem to be reduced by repeated appearances as it might be if the animals had become apathetic.

That doesn’t necessarily mean the horses are having a good time, said Pajor, who’s also on the Stampede’s animal welfare advisory board. There are a couple of ways of interpreting active behaviour in the chute, he said.

“An animal might be getting excited to perform. Or an animal might be having a fear response.”

“Understanding if animals like to do something is a tricky thing to do.”

Pajor knows there are different camps when it comes to rodeos and animals.

“People have very strong opinions on the use of animals for all kinds of reasons. I think no matter what we’re going to use animals for, we really need to make sure that we treat them humanely.

“My job is to do the research to understand the animals’ perspective.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 28, 2021.

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SpaceX Starlink launch aborted, next window opens Monday: How to watch – CNET

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Now playing:
Watch this:

Starlink space-based internet, explained

4:43

50908787166-a9bab179c2-k

A Falcon 9 loaded with Starlink satellites prepares for launch.


SpaceX

Update: Sunday night’s Starlink launch has been aborted. A backup launch window opens tomorrow, Monday March 1 at 5:15 p.m. PT. We’ll have the livestream link here on Monday. The original article follows.

SpaceX is busy sending satellites to space to keep up with the rollout of its Starlink global broadband network.

I received an email notification that the beta version of the high-speed internet service is now available in my area, which is significantly further south than the initial beta offering in Canada and the northern US. (I’m at latitude 36 degrees in the Northern Hemisphere. Vancouver is at 49 degrees.)

It’s a sign that the expansion of Starlink is on schedule, but Elon Musk’s company needs to keep blasting more flying routers into orbit to keep growing and to meet the requirements of its license to operate from the US Federal Communications Commission.

SpaceX could launch its next batch of Starlink broadband satellites from Cape Canaveral in Florida as soon as Sunday night, its fifth Starlink mission of 2021 so far.

This particular set of Starlink devices has been delayed from launching at least nine times due to different technical and weather-related issues. That sounds like a lot, but delays are the name of the game with space launches, and it’s far more unusual for a mission to never be postponed at all.

This next launch comes after the last Starlink mission ended with a lost booster that missed its landing on a company droneship and splashed down in the nearby ocean instead. The booster that is set to be used Sunday night will be making a record-tying eighth launch and landing. Even before the loss of the other Falcon 9 on Feb. 16, SpaceX opted to do another round of due diligence for this mission.

Liftoff is set for Sunday at 5:37 p.m. PT (8:37 p.m. ET) from Kennedy Space Center. The weather looks favorable for the launch and landing on a droneship, as well as the attempted recovery of both halves of the fairing.

We will cover the livestream of the launch right here. It’s set to begin about 10 minutes before launch.

Follow CNET’s 2021 Space Calendar to stay up to date with all the latest space news this year. You can even add it to your own Google Calendar.  

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SpaceX set to launch long-delayed Starlink mission – NASASpaceFlight.com – NASASpaceflight.com

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SpaceX set to launch long-delayed Starlink mission – NASASpaceFlight.com

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