Connect with us

Health

B.C. reports 23 more COVID-19 cases in Island Health, restrictions extended until Feb. 5 – CHEK

Published

 on

British Columbia has reported 761 new cases of COVID-19 across the province in the last 24 hours with 8 additional deaths in that span.

Also on Thursday, Dr. Henry revealed that the current public health orders restricting gatherings and events have been extended until February 5.

Of the 761 new cases, 23 are linked to the Island Health region. The 23 additional cases in Island Health comes one day after a new daily record of 28 cases were announced within the authority.

There are currently 6,349 active cases in British Columbia, while 8,849 residents remain under active public health monitoring.

Dr. Bonnie Henry says that 372 are in hospital currently – a decrease of seven from Wednesday – with 74 people in critical care as a result of the virus (a decrease of four).

On Thursday, there were 8 additional deaths related to the virus. This brings the provincial death total over the course of the pandemic to 970.

Since Wednesday’s numbers, there have been 94 new cases of COVID-19 in the Vancouver Coastal Health region, 484 in the Fraser Health region, 23 in the Island Health region, 96 in the Interior Health region, 64 in the Northern Health region and no new cases of people who reside outside of Canada.

As of Thursday, the total number of cases in British Columbia over the course of the pandemic has been 56,015.

Dr. Henry notes that there has been one new health-care facility outbreak at the Ts’i’ts’uwatul’ Lelum assisted living facility in Duncan – with more details released by Island Health earlier on Thursday.

There are now 51 active outbreaks in long-term care and assisted living and ten in acute care facilities.

Dr. Henry also said that 41,064 people have received a COVID-19 vaccine in B.C.

Restrictions Extended

Dr. Henry also took a moment to address the current provincial health orders in place that have put limits on gatherings and events across the B.C.

She noted that over the last few days there has been a slight increase in the daily COVID-19 numbers being reported in the province and has opted to extend the current restrictions, which were set to be lifted on January 8.

Now, restrictions on gatherings will remain in place until at least February 5.

“Now is our time to stay the course. We know what we need to do to bend that curve back down. We have been successful in doing that prior to this winter break and we need to do that again,” she said.

This means the same requirements that have been in place – limitations on gatherings in people’s homes, the suspension of events in public and private venues, and the restrictions on sports activities – continue to apply.

The health orders span the next two incubation periods, says Dr. Henry.

“This is our winter, but we know spring is coming.”

Dr. Henry also called on British Columbians to reach out virtually to loved ones and spend time connecting in order to support each other through this time.

Island Health

As of Thursday, the health authority had 152 active cases, which marks an increase of 10 in the last 24-hour period.

Of the new cases, 53 (-5) southern Vancouver Island, 73 (+18) on central Vancouver Island and 26 (-3) on northern Vancouver Island.

Southern Vancouver Island includes the Greater Victoria region, Southern Gulf Islands and the Port Renfrew area.

Central Vancouver Island includes the Cowichan Valley, Duncan, Nanaimo, Parksville, Port Alberni and Tofino areas.

Northern Vancouver Island goes from the Comox Valley to Port Hardy but also includes surrounding areas like Alert Bay and Sointula.

Over the course of the pandemic, the Island Health region has reported 1,050 cases.

COVID-19 update from Island Health on Jan. 7, 2021

COVID-19 update from Island Health on Jan. 7, 2021

Update on UK variant

During Thursday’s briefing, Dr. Henry gave a brief update on the new U.K. variant of COVID-19 that was discovered here on Vancouver Island.

The provincial health officer said that since the one person was diagnosed with the new variant, they have been self-isolating, however, two additional cases have been detected.

Both of these two new cases are household contacts of the original case and Dr. Henry says she doesn’t believe anyone else is at risk of this variant.

“I will also say that we have been continuing to do surveillance and testing on people who have travelled as well as a selection of people from around the province on an ongoing basis and we have not yet found any other cases of this variant in B.C.,” Dr. Henry said on Thursday.

Changes in reporting

On Thursday, Dr. Henry revealed a slight change in how health officials will be reporting the daily case numbers moving forward.

The changes are in an effort to streamline the reporting of data to be more efficient for health authorities and the BC Centre for Disease Control.

The new system will automatically report lab-confirmed cases from the previous day, plus reconciling with the health authority cases to provide more timely reporting of data.

The reports will now reflect the positive lab test date as opposed to the “reported date” from each health authority. Labs will now report both to the BC CDC and to health authorities.

This will create an adjustment period, according to Dr. Henry, reflecting higher numbers in the coming days as the new system kicks in and the data lag is eliminated.

“What remains the same is that every case is still counted and every person who is positive is still notified as soon as possible,” noted Dr. Henry.

Health officials will also be providing weekly vaccination updates, specific to each authority.

Source: 

Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Federal panel recommends 4-month gap between COVID vaccine doses due to limited supply – Terrace Standard – Terrace Standard

Published

 on


The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) is supporting B.C.’s decision to delay the second doses of COVID-19 vaccines by up to four months.

“NACI recommends that in the context of limited COVID-19 vaccine supply jurisdictions should maximize the number of individuals benefiting from the first dose of vaccine by extending the second dose of COVID-19 vaccine up to four months after the first,” the committee said in a decision published Wednesday (March 3).

The recommendation applies to all COVID-19 vaccines currently approved in Canada; Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and the newly approved AstroZeneca vaccine.

B.C. announced the decision to delay the second booster shot for four months on Monday, which health officials said could mean that all adults in the province could have their first dose by July.

READ MORE: Most B.C. adults could get their first COVID vaccine shot by July: health officials

Both provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and NACI said that its rationale was based on both the current available vaccine supply and data from other countries.

A study published by the University of Cambridge in the U.K., which has not yet been peer-reviewed, suggests that a single dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine can reduce the number of asymptomatic COVID-19 infections by 75 per cent.

In Israel, researchers studied the effects of a single dose of the same vaccine and published their findings in The Lancet medical journal, concluding that it was 85 per cent effective against symptomatic COVID-19 infections.

Also in The Lancet, a U.K. study found that the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine is 81 per cent effective when its second dose is given three months after the first, compared with 55 per cent efficacy after six weeks.

The national advisory committee noted that since the COVID-19 vaccines are still new, its unknown how long the protection of one or both doses lasts for.

“Experience with other multi-dose vaccines after a single dose suggests persistent protection could last for six months or longer in adolescents and adults,” NACI said in its statement. “Longer-term follow-up of clinical trial participants and those receiving vaccination in public programs will assist in determining the duration of protection following both one and two doses of vaccination.”

The national advisory committee added that it’s unknown how a delayed booster shot regime will affect the spread of variants of concern, including the U.K. and South African ones. However, NACI notes that there is “currently no evidence that an extended interval between doses will either increase or decrease the emergence of variants of concern.”

The committee noted that all three currently approved vaccines have shown “promising early result” against the U.K. variant B.1.1.7.

READ MORE: COVID-19 wage and rent subsidies, lockdown support to be extended until June

– with files from The Canadian Press


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

Coronavirusvaccines

Get local stories you won’t find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Canada vaccine panel recommends 4 months between COVID doses – ABC News

Published

 on


TORONTO — A national panel of vaccine experts in Canada recommended Wednesday that provinces extend the interval between the two doses of a COVID-19 shot to four months to quickly inoculate more people amid a shortage of doses in Canada.

A number of provinces said they would do just that.

Second doses would begin to be administered in July as more shipments arrive, the panel said, noting that 55 million doses are expected to be delivered in July, August and September.

In comparison, the federal government previously said 38% of people would receive two doses by the end of June.

“They are making, I think, a reasonable calculation in a time of drug shortage,” said Dr. Andrew Morris, a professor of infectious diseases at the University of Toronto and the medical director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at Sinai-University Health Network. “It’s the right decision in my mind. Let me ask … A couple are given two vaccines. Do you give two to one, or give one each one dose? It’s a no brainer.”

The addition of the newly approved AstraZeneca vaccine to the country’s supply could mean almost all Canadians would get their first shot in that time frame.

“The vaccine effectiveness of the first dose will be monitored closely and the decision to delay the second dose will be continuously assessed based on surveillance and effectiveness data and post-implementation study designs,” the panel wrote.

“Effectiveness against variants of concern will also be monitored closely, and recommendations may need to be revised,” it said, adding there is currently no evidence that a longer interval will affect the emergence of the variants.

The updated guidance applies to all three of the vaccines currently approved for use in Canada.

Manitoba and Quebec also said Wednesday they will delay second doses. And Ontario’s health minister said it would Ontario to rapidly accelerate its vaccine rollout.

Earlier Wednesday, Trudeau said any change in public health guidance regarding the timing of the two doses could affect the speed of Canada’s vaccine rollout, as could the approval of more vaccines like Johnson and Johnson.

Canada’s provinces administer health care in the country so it’s ultimately up to the provinces.

Dr. Brad Wouters, executive vice-president of science and research at University Health Network, cast doubt on the recommendation. “Nobody in the world has been 4 months between doses. These are RNA vaccines never used before. We should use evidence to make decisions. Canada conducting a population experiment,” Wouters tweeted.

And Mona Nemer, the federal government’s Chief Science Advisor, also said this week that the plan amounts to a “population-level experiment” and that the data provided so far by Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech is based on an interval of three to four weeks between doses.

But Dr. Bonnie Henry, British Columbia’s provincial health officer, said the manufacturers structured their clinical trials that way to get the vaccines to market as quickly as possible, but said research in British Columbia, Quebec, Israel and the United Kingdom has shown that first doses are highly effective.

Dr. Supriya Sharma, chief medical adviser for Health Canada, the country’s regulator, told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in a time of limited supply they are starting to have greater comfort with the idea of waiting for the second dose after seeing real world data versus the strict interpretation of the clinical trials.

“In the real world we’re starting to see evidence from other countries that have delayed that second dose ‘Oh, it looks like they still have a really good effectiveness.’ We have lab studies that show it’s unlikely that immune response will drop off,” Sharma said.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Health

Federal panel recommends 4-month gap between COVID vaccine doses due to limited supply – Maple Ridge News – Maple Ridge News

Published

 on


The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) is supporting B.C.’s decision to delay the second doses of COVID-19 vaccines by up to four months.

“NACI recommends that in the context of limited COVID-19 vaccine supply jurisdictions should maximize the number of individuals benefiting from the first dose of vaccine by extending the second dose of COVID-19 vaccine up to four months after the first,” the committee said in a decision published Wednesday (March 3).

The recommendation applies to all COVID-19 vaccines currently approved in Canada; Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and the newly approved AstroZeneca vaccine.

B.C. announced the decision to delay the second booster shot for four months on Monday, which health officials said could mean that all adults in the province could have their first dose by July.

READ MORE: Most B.C. adults could get their first COVID vaccine shot by July: health officials

Both provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and NACI said that its rationale was based on both the current available vaccine supply and data from other countries.

A study published by the University of Cambridge in the U.K., which has not yet been peer-reviewed, suggests that a single dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine can reduce the number of asymptomatic COVID-19 infections by 75 per cent.

In Israel, researchers studied the effects of a single dose of the same vaccine and published their findings in The Lancet medical journal, concluding that it was 85 per cent effective against symptomatic COVID-19 infections.

Also in The Lancet, a U.K. study found that the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine is 81 per cent effective when its second dose is given three months after the first, compared with 55 per cent efficacy after six weeks.

The national advisory committee noted that since the COVID-19 vaccines are still new, its unknown how long the protection of one or both doses lasts for.

“Experience with other multi-dose vaccines after a single dose suggests persistent protection could last for six months or longer in adolescents and adults,” NACI said in its statement. “Longer-term follow-up of clinical trial participants and those receiving vaccination in public programs will assist in determining the duration of protection following both one and two doses of vaccination.”

The national advisory committee added that it’s unknown how a delayed booster shot regime will affect the spread of variants of concern, including the U.K. and South African ones. However, NACI notes that there is “currently no evidence that an extended interval between doses will either increase or decrease the emergence of variants of concern.”

The committee noted that all three currently approved vaccines have shown “promising early result” against the U.K. variant B.1.1.7.

READ MORE: COVID-19 wage and rent subsidies, lockdown support to be extended until June

– with files from The Canadian Press


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

Coronavirusvaccines

Get local stories you won’t find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending